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Guide dog owners face discrimination 2 years after ban on such practices

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Because this is the land of lip-service laws. I guarantee if one of these people went to complain they would be met with fake smiles (that they couldn't see, probably) and a "moushiwake arimasen" but nothing done besides.

13 ( +17 / -4 )

That's too bad. The only situation I can understand is suddenly showing up at a hotel with a dog because it may leave hair or scent in the room and affect someone with allergies.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

I think guide dogs will be replaced by technology sooner than any of us expect, so hopefully this won't be an issue in the near future.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

I was surprised that many cities have very helpful solutions for blind people there was a definite lack of guide dogs which only provide an essential service for the blind but also offer companionship too.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

The companionship between visually impaired people and their guide dogs is on a much higher level than those of us who have dogs as pets.

As long as the guide dogs are quiet and well behaved, it's difficult to understand what the problem is. Allergies perhaps, but I can't think of many people with that problem.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

Allergies perhaps, but I can't think of many people with that problem.

You would be surprised. Lots of people have allergies to pets. What do you do if a customer complains they're allergic - tell them to get lost, or say they can have an allergy attack and suffer in silence?

Then there is the fact that some people are scared of dogs, or what they might do.

Lots of this comes down to education. Guide dogs are well-trained and highly unlikely to attack someone unprovoked, or crap on the floor. They're also normally well-groomed, so won't be carrying ticks or shedding lots of hair that causes allergies. If you do get dogs into your establishment, you just need to clean a little more frequently. As for taxi drivers, if a dog cannot sit in the foot-well, I guess they could carry an old blanket for it to sit on.

Discrimination against guide dogs is not surprising in Japan. Guide dogs were common enough when I was a child in the UK that we were told about them in school. That sticks with people. In Japan, if they're relatively recent (Japanese organisation set up more than 30 years after the UK charity) then you have to convince adults they're not a problem, in contrast to simply telling children they're ok.

The answer is more education in schools, led by the Japan Guide Dog Association, with the Association leading an education plan for businesses, as well as trying to get an accreditation system going (e.g. restaurant X is guide dog-friendly, guide dog users will be more likely to go there). Tougher legislation may be necessary as well.

-4 ( +7 / -11 )

So countries like Britain which have a very high number of guide dogs don't have all the negative reactions posted by some here.

12 ( +14 / -2 )

Allergies - what a load of crock.

So no dogs should be allowed anywhere if that's the case - just in case.

I wonder if any of those establishment have  banned smoking because people may have reactions like asthma, and skin, eye, throat etc allergies.

The law is on the side of the visually impaired and their guide dogs.

Fine the establishments. That'll set them straight.

17 ( +20 / -3 )

So countries like Britain which have a very high number of guide dogs don't have all the negative reactions posted by some here.

Not necessarily. There is still prejudice against guide dogs, including by immigrants from Muslim countries where dogs are regarded as unclean. As I said, it's largely about education.

So no dogs should be allowed anywhere if that's the case - just in case.

There's no worry about dogs in the open air, but there is a potential concern if they're in an enclosed space. As for smoking, some restaurants and hotels do ban it, as well as taxis.

Remember, Japan introduced legislation to support guide dog users, not discriminate against them.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

Shumatsu - I thought my points were obviously cynical.

But my key query was -  I wonder....wonder that is....if any of the same restaurants concerned about dog allergies allow smoking??? We all know smoking is banned in some places.

Just wondering.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Remember, Japan introduced legislation to support guide dog users, not discriminate against them.

laws do not prevent discrimination and prejudice and only provide for a recourse when it happens. Many countries have have laws against discrimination and it's a good point on this one introduced in Japan but people still discriminate just there's no law about having tattoos but still unable to use public bathing.

I have seen many blind people and here in Kobe I'm impressed by the services to help them but never once in Japan have I see a guide dog.

In Britain, Muslim restaurants can not refuse guide dogs and the Shariah Council lifted any ban on guide dogs used by the disabled.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

if any of the same restaurants concerned about dog allergies allow smoking?

I don't know. You would have to ask someone with a guide dog to test it for you.

In Britain, Muslim restaurants can not refuse guide dogs

There have been numerous incidents in the past years about Muslims refusing service to people with guide dogs, despite some Muslim organisations saying there's nothing wrong with them. It doesn't matter what the law says, if people are prejudiced or ignorant they will discriminate.

This is why education is vital.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

I find it strange that a caring country like Japan would react to guide dogs like that.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

As long as the guide dogs are quiet and well behaved, it's difficult to understand what the problem is. Allergies perhaps, but I can't think of many people with that problem.

In terms of all the people and companies that still discriminate, the problem is very simple: ignorance, and a lack of basic common sense.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Shumatsu_Samurai: "Remember, Japan introduced legislation to support guide dog users, not discriminate against them."

Sorry, but introducing something you have no plans to enforce is simply toothless, as are the smoking "bans" that we've seen take place in certain places in Japan and yet you can still see people LITERALLY lighting up a smoke under a no smoking sign and instead of anything being done about it, you might actually be warned not to say anything to the person because they might snap. That's just one example, but the point being Japan may have introduced legislation, but clearly as seen in the article little to nothing is being done to enforce it, or nothing against those with exercising the same prejudices as before the legislation. Ergo, don't go patting yourself on the back until you've DONE something besides talk.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The biggest and fastest way to "education" are a few major cases in the courts and business owners will educated very quickly.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Well, from my point of view I think this visually impaired people who use guide dogs is very westernized culture to be introduced in oriental country, Japan is. All what we need is time. Time will tell when it will be appropriated to any public places accept them. Discrimination is not the word to say at this moment, first of all is to people get used to them. Pets were not accepted any public places 50 years ago anywhere in the world, may be only the special location you know.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

I'm not a big fan of these emotional support dogs.

Slme people are allergic to these animals so, and it's not hygienic in public restaurants.

-11 ( +1 / -12 )

Too many paranoid people.

Imagine yourselves being the blind person walking and going about your life with your trusted companion only to be harassed and disrespected by others who happen to have an 'advantage' or privilege of sight.

Sorry, no dogs. Oh please...those wonderfully-trained beings are much better behaved and CLEANER than many human customers.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Most every other first world country has adopted laws that prohibit any descrimination against a person with a person with a guide dog, the dog goes where the person does end of story and it hasn't been much of a problem or put out for anyone.

I'm not talking about fake service animals or emotional support animals in which these people are just looking for attention that they can't get otherwise.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

If laws are not enforced then what is the meaning of that law?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I think guide dogs will be replaced by technology sooner than any of us expect, so hopefully this won't be an issue in the near future.

While I agree, please know that for many these animals are more than just guides, they are partners, and provide companionship above and beyond what any technology may provide.

I'm not a big fan of these emotional support dogs.

If they are legitimate, that's one thing, the one's that bug the hell out of me are the people who use loopholes to bring their pet where ever they go. It gives a bad name to the people who may need them. Oh and the ones who abuse the system to allow their pests to fly with them in airplanes!

7 ( +7 / -0 )

While I agree, please know that for many these animals are more than just guides, they are partners, and provide companionship above and beyond what any technology may provide.

Yes I'm certainly aware of that since I have a fair bit of experience working with blind people, but once guide dogs are no longer absolutely essential for mobility, the law forcing businesses to admit them will lose much of its justification.

Clearly many people diagree with my prediction but I wonder how many of them have actually looked at some of the amazing new technology being rolled out, even just this year. Dogs are not machines and they are not going to be able to compete with cheaper, more reliable, more convenient, and more effective technology that doesn't poop. Even those who might still prefer a guide dog may have little say in the matter since it's often charities and not the guide dog users themselves who invest a tremendous amount in training the dogs.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

On a bit of a side note, i see a lot of people using sticks/dogs who obviously can see, anyone know why?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

After such efforts, 50.7 percent said they were able to enter facilities while 28.0 percent said they were still not allowed to do so.

78.7% What happened to the other 22.3%? Are they still standing there negotiating the issue?

I understand the allergy thing, so a sign posted at the door could let the public that a guide dog was recently on the premises. I would love to see restaurants do the same for smokers.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I think it's kind of reasonable to have to explain that it's a guide dog, unless there is some kind of sign or harness for the dog that is widely recognized to be specifically for guide dogs. To be denied entry/services after explaining is ridiculous.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In some "Multicultural" countries sight impaired people with guide dogs often face refusal by Taxi Drivers whose religion does not allow them to come into contact with dogs.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Alexandre T Ishii: “Discrimination is not the word to say at this moment, first of all is to people get used to them.”

Funny, they don’t want to take time to get used to the idea of foreigners coming here and seeing Japanese society as advanced, nor do they want to slow down on their bids to host international sporting events like the Olympics and showcase how accepting Japan is. It’s discrimination, plain and simple, my friend, and any business that engages in it should be shut down, or at the very least the employees fired if acting on their own. You guys seem pretty proud of Japan’s advancements when it suits you, and defensive and crying “imperialism” when it doesn’t. Can’t have it both ways. Get back in your kimono and isolate the country, or get with the times and lift up your head with pride, including being able to face and deal with discrimination when it comes up instead of hiding.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yes I'm certainly aware of that since I have a fair bit of experience working with blind people, but once guide dogs are no longer absolutely essential for mobility, the law forcing businesses to admit them will lose much of its justification.

What you wrote here makes no sense to me.

You say, that because of new technology, dogs wont be necessary for mobility, so that means blind people wont need them anymore, so if they wont need the animals for mobility, there will be no need for any laws giving them access.

Unless you then are referring to the animals just being "pets".

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What you wrote here makes no sense to me.

Unless you then are referring to the animals just being "pets".

Thats what I'm saying. There is no reason to continue to imposing obligations on businesses to admit animals against their will once technology has rendered them redundant as visual aids. It's the same logic behind no longer allowing horses and buggies on busy highways.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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