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Health insurance law revised to limit coverage to Japan residents

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Japan was stupid to allow this to happen in the first place.

13 ( +18 / -5 )

This health insurance scheme is another scam for foreigners living in Japan. The premiums are hefty, but the service is minimal. Wait until you are over 50 and see how much they expect you to pay. I purposely keep my taxable income under or around 2 million yen per year. If I didn't they'd be taking the better part of 30% of my salary just for health insurance, plus 15% for the pension, plus city tax (¥15,000 p/m), plus 10% sales tax. To all you young folk, don't stay in Japan too long. You'll never get out of here coz they'll tax you to a point of not being able to save money unless you live on cup noodles! I'll be doing a runner in the next 12 months and not looking back.

-1 ( +20 / -21 )

@disallusioned. Your city tax seems very cheap!

my hospital doesn’t have such a big problem as only old and mentally challenged patients come, but some of my colleagues and friends work in prefectural or university hospitals. Some Foreigners come on tourist visas, have ¥500000 treatments, don’t pay a cent and just fly home. That is a problem.

16 ( +18 / -2 )

Wait until you are over 50 and see how much they expect you to pay. I purposely keep my taxable income under or around 2 million yen per year. If I didn't they'd be taking the better part of 30% of my salary just for health insurance

You need to get yourself a new accountant. I'm over 50, earn well over 2 million a year, and pay nowhere near 30% in health insurance - and since I'm self-employed, it's the more expensive kokumin kenko hoken, not the company-subsidised health insurance. Local tax works out at around ¥10,000 a month, I understand that differs from region to region.

the service is minimal

Again, can't agree. I've had very few problems.

they'll tax you to a point of not being able to save money unless you live on cup noodles!

Funny, we've been able to save while buying a house and putting two kids through university. And we don't live on cup noodles, we eat very well.

I'll be doing a runner in the next 12 months and not looking back.

Bye-bye. Don't let the door.....

13 ( +25 / -12 )

I agree with cleo, no way it is 30%. I am paying the same kokumin kenko hoken, and it's about 10%, but with that, I think the coverage is pretty good. Get an MRI anytime I want, no waiting, minimal cost. Dental, prescriptions covered, and if you keep your receipts and go over a certain amount, you will get tax back.

I hate to see people abusing the system, but it is going to happen. Wasn't that what happened to Rola's father? Or was his case different.

11 ( +16 / -5 )

Wait until you are over 50 and see how much they expect you to pay. I purposely keep my taxable income under or around 2 million yen per year. If I didn't they'd be taking the better part of 30% of my salary just for health insurance,

I live in one of the prefectures with the highest rates, and we are nowhere near 30% for the entire family, and I am well over 50.

12 ( +14 / -2 )

I'm 52 in a few months, my tax is around 10% and I'm self employed.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

@Disillusioned

My taxes and shakaihoken are all very similar to what friends pay back in Canada, despite healthcare being free over there. Healthcare is comparable too with each country having different strengths. Health insurance costs me roughly 10% a paycheck, and I’m 50.

The wife and I both work, and save a few million a year even w 2 kids a house and a new car, and a trip home for the 4 of us every 2 years.

Sounds like either you had bad advice or have been doing things wrong. Really really wrong.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

My taxes are nonexistent. Insurance is like 1500 a month.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Disillusioned

I think you just outed yourself to the tax man dude lol!

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Disillusioned, might be right, the heakth insurance is calculated based on your previous year income. I was levied 93,000yen per month for health insurance while I unemployed and receiving employment benefit. My first benefit was like 60,000yen while the health insurance was 93,000yen. Common sense says it is impossible for someone without an income to pay such an amount yet the guys i the city office are not different from robots they don't think and just follow the manual I went there spoke hard to them and they brought it down to 41,000yen which was still higher than what I paid when I was a salaryman.

The japanese is such that you get punished when you quit your job like I did.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

I am over 50 and have been living here and paying into for 30 years. I agree with all the other posters; no way it is 30%. Also I save way more money here than my friends do in Canada.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

It's tougher than some other places I've lived in, but I am determined to stay. This country is worth the effort.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

To all you young folk, don't stay in Japan too long. You'll never get out of here coz they'll tax you to a point of not being able to save money unless you live on cup noodles! I'll be doing a runner in the next 12 months and not looking back.

Would it really count as "not looking back" if you spent the previous 10 years whingeing incessantly? More like the longest leaving note in history.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

The issue of extremely high health insurance rates occurs with people who enter their second year in Japan or after a change in employment. I have experienced this, my insurance went from being reasonable to being over a quarter of my paycheck. It took a lot of wrangling to get the city ward to back off. I forget the details of how and why it happened as it was nearly a decade ago, but I can say that it does happen to some people and the ones who don't fight back on the issue end up paying exorbitant health insurance rates.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

These limitations sounds reasonable. I was happy with the balance of payments and service I got while in Japan. I like the national system better than the complicated US way with many different options. There you need always worry and double-check that your insurance company pays the treatment or service.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

@cleo and MarkX - definitely agree with you, both. Just yesterday, I went in for my endoscopic exam. I have to take a similar exam from the other end later this week. Anyway, with my endoscopic exam, results, and preparation set for my next exam, my out of pocket costs was ¥4900. You try getting that deal in the US, where I’m from. I did the research. Good luck! @ Dillusioned - Adios, and don’t let the door hit you in the .....!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

We were on kokumin hoken until 2004 when we left living in Japan permanently (miss living here full time!) and loved it. Self employed with 3 in family I think we paid about ¥17,000 a month if I remember. And service was great at hospitals! USA system is a total mess!! If not for family, we'd retire in Japan.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Japan definitely has the best medical system in the world. This is reflected by the longest life average in the World. It would be extremely regrettable if all the temporarary "blue collar" workers coming, put any strain on the hospitals or cost the government money. They absolutely must pay for their health insurance as part of VISA requirements.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Having read all the comments, it seems as if many people have different experiences.

However,one thing is sure-health costs have to rise!

There is no way around that....

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I'm retired and pay about ¥5,000 per month and some small amount for future care. 20% for healthcare and ¥12,000/month maximum for hospital treatment. Paid in for 25 years.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

There are statistics classified by country which abuses the health insurance system.

The top is China.

Entire 80% is occupied.

That's annoying.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@

Ganbare: : japan definitely has the best medical system in the world.

.

Absolutely- Ranks at the very top.

Efficient,high quality medical care, ( often state-of-art) and -as most people indicated very fair insurance premiums.

.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Bugle Boy of Company B\: Japan was stupid to allow this to happen in the first place.

.

No Not "stupid".

It was gracious.

.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

@ Disilusions.

.

If you want to see a G7 country where services are "minimal" try Canada.

It's a living night mare.

Japan"s medical service remains pre-eminently on top: it;s efficient, thorough in addressing a medical problem, hard-working medical personnel (nurses, doctors), and providing excellent pharmaceutical options - along with a very fair premium scale.

.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

You need to get yourself a new accountant. I'm over 50, earn well over 2 million a year, and pay nowhere near 30% in health insurance - and since I'm self-employed, it's the more expensive kokumin kenko hoken, not the company-subsidised health insurance. Local tax works out at around ¥10,000 a month, I understand that differs from region to region.

Of course I don’t want to ask about your salary, but ¥10,000 a month in local tax? I’m not in the high-flyer bracket but I pay well over that.

Does the local tax differ that much according to region?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@ sourpuss ; ,,,,, *taxes and shakaihoken are all very similar to what friends pay back in Canada*, despite healthcare being free over there.

.

Health care is not "Free" in Canada.

People pay monthly premiums (which vary Provincially).

That being said - Canada offers only minimal care.

Surgery for a broken leg ? In and out in a day.

One can wait 8 months or more for an MRI.

Or pay $1000.00 ( over 100000 Yen) at a private clinic.

{However you still need "permission" from a doctor to obtain an MRI from a private clinic.}

0 ( +4 / -4 )

I don't know why I am being down voted. It is no hidden secret that your health insurance is based on your previous year income as if the stash away somewhere for you to retrieve and pay.

Maybe some of you don't know, if you stay 2 days April 30th and May 1st in hospital you pay the minimum 200.000yen, calculated as 2 months whereas if you spend 30days April 1 to April 30 you pay 100,000yen calculated as one month, the stated amount doesn't include room and other charges.

If you were to be admitted and had a choice when to go in, you have to make sure in doesn't extend to the following month.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

 if you stay 2 days April 30th and May 1st in hospital you pay the minimum 200.000yen, calculated as 2 months whereas if you spend 30days April 1 to April 30 you pay 100,000yen calculated as one month

It depends what you're in hospital for. There is no 'minimum 100,000 yen per month'.

Thankfully I haven't spent much time hospitalised so I can't speak for all ailments, but when I spent 5 days in hospital having my appendix out many moons ago the cost was less than 2 man - including meals.

Does the local tax differ that much according to region?

Apparently, yes. I guess I'm lucky.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

If I have to be in hospital for one month, max cost is ¥12,000.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Disillusioned , I guess you are going back to Brexit .. You are funny man

3 ( +3 / -0 )

My experience with the health system in Japan has been very good. Dental mostly paid for, free annual cancer screenings etc. Once I had a consultation with a neurosurgeon, an MRI and 6 hours in a hyperbaric chamber cost 10,000 yen.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

@semperfi

Health care is not "Free" in Canada.

How things have changed. mea culpa.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

hankfully I haven't spent much time hospitalised so I can't speak for all ailments, but when I spent 5 days in hospital having my appendix out many moons ago

Last year I spent 3 nights in the hospital, having surgery that required a general anesthetic. It cost me 70,000.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Where to start;

Wait until you are over 50 and see how much they expect you to pay. I purposely keep my taxable income under or around 2 million yen per year. If I didn't they'd be taking the better part of 30% of my salary just for health insurance, plus 15% for the pension, plus city tax (¥15,000 p/m), plus 10% sales tax. To all you young folk, don't stay in Japan too long. You'll never get out of here coz they'll tax you to a point of not being able to save money unless you live on cup noodles! I'll be doing a runner in the next 12 months and not looking back.

This is bull! If you are over 50 you should know better! And I mean that too! You are passing along blatantly false information here.

The "kaigo-hoken" you refer to starts at 40, and the government is looking at starting it at 30 because of the aging society, and the cost varies by income, however your statement that they take 30% of your salary for health insurance is also 100% false as well.

Example; Someone who makes roughly 3.5 to 4.0 million per year, would have around 11,000 to 12,000 yen taken out per month for health insurance. Around 2,000 per month for the "kaigo hoken" and nearly 20,000 yen per month for payment to the pension plan.

You are adding all those numbers together and calling it "health insurance" stop giving false information here please. There is no benefit to keeping your income under 2 Million per year. If you kept if at 1.3 Million or under you might be on the mark, as that is what spouses are allowed to make yearly, and are pretty much tax exempt!

But from the comments you make, maybe you are only able to find a job that pays that much, who knows!

Oh and by the way, those numbers came from a pay stub, and not just pulled out of the air!

I suggest you educate yourself next time, before commenting like this!

https://blog.gaijinpot.com/understanding-the-japanese-health-insurance-system-part-1-2-how-much-does-it-cost/

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I don't know why I am being down voted. It is no hidden secret that your health insurance is based on your previous year income as if the stash away somewhere for you to retrieve and pay.

This is a fact, and the poster who commented about receiving a bill for insurance that was more than their pay, does not know the system at all, and made comments accordingly.

They also do not know, obviously, that they could as well go to their local municipal office and discuss the issue with them, they CAN and will assist.!

Maybe some of you don't know, if you stay 2 days April 30th and May 1st in hospital you pay the minimum 200.000yen, calculated as 2 months whereas if you spend 30days April 1 to April 30 you pay 100,000yen calculated as one month, the stated amount doesn't include room and other charges.

Dont know what hospital you stayed at but sounds to me, from experience of working in Japanese hospitals for well over a decade, that someone ripped you off BIG TIME!

There is no set 100,000 monthly charge for staying in a hospital here! Billing systems are different depending upon the hospital, but there is no flat daily or monthly rate.

Charges are insurance billable, and non-insurance billable,

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Over the past two years I have had maybe 20 CT scans, 5 PET scans, was hospitalized 4 times for a total of maybe 60 days, numerous other procedures (X-rays, MRIs, endoscopy, EKGs, colonoscopy, radiation, etc.), and enough pills and infusions to kill a horse – and with the exception of the room charges (yen 12,000 for a private), I never paid more than yen 34,000/month.

Of course when I was working I paid in very serious premiums, but I am very grateful for Japan’s health care system – top notch, latest equipment, and very good doctors and nurses. If forced to identify a complaint, I would offer – slow to approve new drugs in comparison to the US.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Some very baffling numbers and rates flying around here. Some seem to be getting squeezed to death and others seem to be living with reasonable medical and tax rates.

I seem to be in the middle somewhere.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Does the local tax differ that much according to region?, Apparently, yes. I guess I'm lucky.

Basically NO the "local tax" as you call it, "Residence Tax", is combination of the municipal tax and prefectural residence tax, and it is based upon one's yearly income and paid over 4 installments over one year.

It is basically a 6 level system, that is billed at 5%, 10%, 20% 23%,33%,and 40% of reported income. The money is divided between the local municipality and prefecture.

A rather fair description of the tax and how it is configured;

http://www.nic-nagoya.or.jp/en/e/archives/358

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Yubaru

That’s what I thought. I’m here in Japan for the money and I’m so I’m reasonably clued up when it comes to what I need to pay. I’ve lived in a city outside Tokyo and 2 different wards of Tokyo and the residential tax rates differed but not hugely.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

 I’ve lived in a city outside Tokyo and 2 different wards of Tokyo and the residential tax rates differed but not hugely.

The residence tax WILL vary if you live in a village, town or city, rising according to which you live in as the services that each provide are a bit different. It's highest in a city, and lowest in a village.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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