national

Heavy snow falls along Sea of Japan coast

11 Comments

Prefectures along the Sea of Japan coast received heavy snow on Thursday, with the Japan Meteorological Agency issuing a warning for more to come.

The agency said the the heavy snowfall is being caused by a low-pressure system over the Sea of Japan and a cold air mass which has brought the lowest temperatures so far this winter to the Tohoku and Chugoku regions, Fuji TV reported. Officials have warned of disruptions to traffic, train and flight services.

By noon Thursday, 64 centimeters of snow had fallen on Ono City in Fukui Prefecture, and 63 centimeters on Shirakawa City in Gifu Prefecture, the agency said.

The agency said the heavy snow is expected to continue through Friday morning, with the Hokuriku and Tokai regions expected to receive up to 60 centimeters.

The Fire and Disaster Management Agency and local police officials are urging residents in areas where there is heavy snow to exercise caution when clearing snow from the roof. In order to prevent houses from collapsing under the weight of snow, many people including the elderly often use a ladder to climb up onto their roofs but lose their footing on the snowy roofs.

A number of people have also been buried by snow falling off the roof of their houses.

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11 Comments
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A number of people have also been buried by snow falling off the roof of their houses.

What kind of number? 3? 300? A bit of snow down the back of the neck? Buried to death?

5 ( +8 / -3 )

The people from the region are much more used to snow than other parts of the country, so I hope preparations and precautions are taken properly, but still it is impossible to avoid completely accidents and maybe even some fatalities,

1 ( +4 / -3 )

In most countries regularly subject to heavy snowfall the houses are built to withstand it with features like very steep rooves to limit the buildup?

Doesn’t this happen in Japan?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

This year the snow is so deep most houses that shed snow with steep pitches are totally backed up so any new snow we get from here on has nowhere to go. The snow at my place is at least 1m higher than usual.

Another reason is many houses have snow stoppers on the roof to stop snow avalanching onto the street or their neighbours house etc so you have to remove it manually.

The locals take incredible risks, never a harness to be seen. You see people on 3 or 4 story buildings walking without a care in the world.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

This is great image

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Nice composition. The red umbrella contrasted against Toyama Castle blanketed in white.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Very peaceful looking image.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Japan houses from 1980 are built according to regulations to withstand a strong earthquake (7+) but unfortunately there isn’t any regulations for snow. But some designs both old and new are in such ways as much snow fall off naturally. However, a large number of houses still require physical removal of this snow from the roof.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

it seems this region has had a number of heavy snow alerts this winter. Is this year going to be a record?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It snow so much overnight, can’t find my tanuki this morning.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

After reading this article regarding the heavy snowfall, if one was assessing which prefecture to choose to reside on Japan, Okinawa would be the Number One Choice by far. Which is better:

A. Dealing with the Cold, Snow and/or Ice; or

B. Being in comfortable temperatures on the Sand, Sea and other beautiful activities associated with the Sand and Sea.

“B” would be the easy choice. If one chooses B, Okinawa by far is definitely the Number One Prefecture to reside.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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