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Hitachi Zosen develops automatic flood protection barrier

15 Comments

Engineering company Hitachi Zosen Corp says it has developed an automatic water protection barrier. The door-like barrier, which is intended for use in businesses, apartment blocks or public institutions, is installed in the ground beneath an aperture or doorway. It is designed to protect against small tsunami or high water levels caused by heavy downpours.

The company said in a statement that its barrier includes an aperture at its base into which water is allowed to flow. If the water level rises, a hollow, stainless-steel barrier automatically rises from the ground to close the passage. The barrier returns to its original position automatically when the water level subsides.

Hitachi Zosen claims the system is design to allowed vehicles to pass through unimpeded when water levels are safe and that the barrier remains operational despite power cuts.

Installation, says Hitachi Zosen, is simple and in most cases can be completed within a day or two. According to a spokesperson, pricing depends on installation needs but in most cases institutions can expect to pay from 1.5 million yen to 3 million yen per square meter. Hitachi Zosen can currently produce barriers up to 2 meters high and 10 meters wide.

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15 Comments
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Off-course Murphy's law will ensure that a KuroiNeko truck has parked right on top of this gate when the flood hits.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I can't see how this would help the building as a whole unless it also works to cover the windows and every entrance on the ground floor, I dont know many buildings with only 1 single door of entry on the ground floor. You would have to install one of these on all the windows as well... unless they have window model as well?

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Intrigueing, especially because it operates without power and a decision does not have to be made to activate it. I'm just wondering if it can handle the load of water. From the rendering, it looks like it would need quite a strong foundation and if it rises based on the principle of bouyancy in the hollow metal barrier, the barrier itself might be too flimsy.

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Another useless japanese invention, make to look smart and in the process rob the poor people of japan!!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

It's something to sell to the government for a bunch of money, like I said unless you're living in a bomb shelter with only 1 door or a garage, I can't see a benefit to project 1 door, water doesn't flow like sand.

Nessie: It requires power, it operates despite a power cut... most likely on batteries that would have to be changed and tested every year or so I would hope.

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I could see the item being used around a neighborhood in conjunction with a wall. Cost effective? The cost to build a waterproof wall and the upkeep would be very high. I'd put more money into water breaks and levies

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I see a problem with their design. Storm Drains. While you have done a good job blocking the water on the surface, any storm drains on the "wet" side will allow the water to travel through the drains and gush out of storm drains on the "dry" side until the pressure differential has been eliminated.

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Another useless japanese invention, make to look smart and in the process rob the poor people of japan!!

Definitely not true! Lucky Plaza in Singapore has been flooded twice in the last two years due to heavy rains. The entire lower floor of shops is below street level and both occasions have resulted in extensive loss of merchandise and long cleanup closures. This appears to be exactly what is needed.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

http://www.temasekreview.com/2011/06/05/photos-retail-malls-in-orchard-hit-by-massive-flooding/

Here's a link to go with the above post.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

what about cars,trucks, ships and boats floating by smashing the barrier ? That`s what exactly happened in Fukushima and neighboring towns. Imagine a 5 ton fishing boat coming over the wall.

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It doesn't claim to be a cure-all. It has it's applications....to think this would have prevented damage in a major tsunami is ludicrous.

It is designed to protect against small tsunami or high water levels caused by heavy downpours Neither of which would result in 5 ton fishing boats coming over the wall (by the way 5 tons is very small for a fishing boat.....more like a cabin cruiser).

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

This is protection rewally not effective. Stupids...

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This device isn't designed for massive tsunami's nor is it marketed as one. It does have applications, floods and typhoons are an application it can be used for.

Just because you think it is stupid doesn't mean it is.

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Nessie: It requires power, it operates despite a power cut... most likely on batteries that would have to be changed and tested every year or so I would hope.

Thanks. Source?

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Badge213Aug. 12, 2011 - 08:34AM JST

This device isn't designed for massive tsunami's nor is it marketed as one. It does have applications, floods and typhoons are an application it can be used for. Just because you think it is stupid doesn't mean it is.

Unreal. As rule used dike. But it not practical fro Japan. I sure that houses and transport infrastructure of seacoast must be set up than 10 meters.

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