A damaged gate of a Buddhist temple is seen untouched on an empty street in Futaba, Fukushima Prefecture, on March 1. Photo: AP/Hiro Komae
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Hope, hard reality mix in Fukushima town wrecked by nuclear disaster

11 Comments
By Mari Yamaguchi

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11 Comments
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This ‘was’ a beautiful part of Japan’s coast line. There were quite a few wonderful campgrounds along this section of coast. I camped and surfed up there a few times in the late 2000’s. The nuclear power plants were part of the landscape. I said to myself then, “if something goes wrong with these power plants this whole area will be destroyed. Low and behold, it happened! The earthquake and tsunami were the catalyst but the meltdowns were caused by TEPCO’s ignorance and refusal to upgrade the safety standards of the plant. They were advised to waterproof all the back up electrical systems and to move the back up generators to the top of the housings. Had they have done this there would not have been any meltdowns. It’s disgusting that this company could get away with this. The 200,000 people displaced by this man made disaster have not been fully compensated. TEPCO should never be allowed to turn any profit until all these people have been fully compensated and have their lives back.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

I am seriously considering moving to Tomioka or Futaba when I retire in a few years. Beach and fishing and plenty of places to ride and hike.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

A lot of money spent, for so few.

Who would want to return to a town without a school or a doctor? I don’t think young people with children will want to come,” he said.

A temporary town hall is set to open in August, and an 86-unit public housing complex is also being built. The town's goal is to have 2,000 residents within five years.

‘Move the poor in, save face, might even get a Family Mart with that number of customers.

What a total pipe dream.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Talk about war crimes? how about we talk about civic crime?, this is a massive crime perpetrated by a company on the Japanese people. Death destruction dislocation of thousands due to a “Company” putting profits, not even profits just flat out laziness on safety at A Nuclear Power Plant, that must qualify as a Crime at least criminal incompetence? But I’m not Japanese so shogani.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

@zichi.

these are in decontaminated areas near recent developments. Go 1km away and you hit 0.4 to 0.6.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The town's goal is to have 2,000 residents within five years.

Local government have their own way,

The latest surveys show that only 11.3% of the 5,625 people still registered as Futaba residents want to return home to live there, with more than 60% saying they will not

residence have their own way.

Futaba Project, which helps revitalize the town through tourism, new businesses and migration from outside Fukushima, sees potential for educational tourism.

Educational Tourism, it's more human disaster tourism.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Please don’t bring children to such areas. When they are old they can trace their roots. Not fair to expose when they have their whole lives ahead of them.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Think the term is “ crap information crap follow up crap care. You go near that place you are definitely on your own. But good headlines for the status quo.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

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