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Hundreds of protesters force anti-Korean event to be canceled near Tokyo

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Hundreds of protesters force anti-Korean event to be canceled near Tokyo

Great news! God's speed to the protesters.

4 ( +20 / -16 )

Lol, nice one!

Stamp these racist, hate-filled dinosaurs out. Power to these people, they stood up and won

10 ( +22 / -12 )

Police arrested a 67-year-old Kawasaki resident for destroying property after he allegedly ripped a placard from the hands of a 52-year-old who was attempting to enter the event.

Should've given the guy a ribbon instead.

The guidelines empower the city government to ban or cancel such events at public venues but it did not apply the measure in this case because it fell short of the required conditions.

Pffff, I guess someone from the city counsel was also planning to attend the event. There should be NO PLACE for hate speech whatsoever, anywhere, anytime.

The law says speaking or acting in ways that encourage discrimination of people from abroad and their descendants or incite their expulsion cannot be tolerated.

It does not, however, stipulate concrete rules or penalties and entrusts local authorities to work out measures to stamp out instances of hate speech.

So this law is just a BIG HUGE BS!

2 ( +9 / -7 )

@papigiullo

Just because a law or a norm does not stipulate any kind of penalty or punishment does not mean the law is BS.

The mere existence of the law ables the people and the authorities to take actions (like the present case).

It is sad that a law like this should have to be made... in a ideal society it should be a matter of commons sense and respect enough to prevent these kind of hate speech and other stuff like this

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Good!

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

So, the protesters got the rally cancelled. However, it was a hate speech rally and the local council did nothing to stop it? When is a law not a law? When it's a Japanese law!

5 ( +17 / -12 )

In junior high (early 90s), one of my best friends very nervously came out as an ethnic Korean, and that I was the first person he had ever come out to. Not to be outdone, I came out as gay, and he was the first person I'd ever came out to. We've been close friends ever since. He said I couldn't tell anyone because when he went job hunting, nobody would hire him if they know about his Korean genes. He tells me stories about his and other ethnic Korean families. One of the biggest problems they have is that most of them are now Japan-born and bred, many don't speak Korean and have no Korean ethnic identity, they don't feel like "ethnic Koreans" (在日韓国人). They want to naturalize to become legally Japanese (which is really easy now for them), but the parents say, No! don't do it because they have to maintain tradition. At least the ethnic Koreans I know tell me that they have not had hate speech directed at them, and with the worker shortage, jobs are not a problem anymore.

11 ( +17 / -6 )

@papigiulio Today 04:35 pm JST

Should've given the guy a ribbon instead.

Sorry, no. 67-year-old fulfilled the definitional elements of a crime while 52-year-old was a victim while trying to exercise his free speech rights as guaranteed by Article 21 of the Japanese constitution. There is no reason to not arrest 67yo here.

-2 ( +10 / -12 )

I'm sure if this was in Korea or china and they held an anti-Japanese event, it would have had the full support of the government & the media.

doublestandards.
-5 ( +12 / -17 )

Hate speech is all about perception and who gets to define what it is. Japan should be careful not to follow the Western nations into oblivion.

-2 ( +11 / -13 )

A defeat for Freedom of Speech. I’m angry about this, not that I agreed with the anti-Korean Groups.

-6 ( +13 / -19 )

Sorry, no. 67-year-old fulfilled the definitional elements of a crime while 52-year-old was a victim while trying to exercise his free speech rights as guaranteed by Article 21 of the Japanese constitution. There is no reason to not arrest 67yo here.

Funny how in this case the law works as it should and the destroyer is arrested but when it comes to hate speech the law LACKS teeth.

Free speech is good but not if it is used to spread hate and violence. 2 completely different things.

3 ( +10 / -7 )

I agree with pro-Korean groups

-1 ( +9 / -10 )

I never thought I would see the day in Japan when the vast majority of decent, hard working, tax-paying, peaceful, respectable people who want to get on with their lives and their neigbours would start to use some people power.

Good to see.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

The entire idea of 'hate speech' is largely a house of cards. If I say "We should do 'x' horrible thing to 'y' group" that will likely be classified as hate speech. But if I say instead, "We should advocate for an amendment in the law so that it becomes legal for the state to do 'x' horrible thing to 'y' group", that is absolutely protected speech as an exchange of political ideas which can never be criminalised in any free democratic society.

Ultimately, hate speech laws disproportionately affect the disadvantaged and less sophisticated people in society who either lack the verbal acuity to express their ideas in a measured way or the education and intelligence to understand the very fine line these laws are built on. They do nothing to address the underlying ideas behind the speech.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Shutting someone down who is spewing hate speech is not infringing on freedom of speech; it’s showing the hater that speech has consequences. You can say whatever you want; if you get punched out for it, be prepared.

It’s when the government decides NHK and newspapers can’t write or say anything bad about an obviously immoral and incompetent leader that freedom of speech is being infringed.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

I'm sure if this was in Korea or china and they held an anti-Japanese event, it would have had the full support of the government & the media.

We are talking about anti-korean protests and hate speeches in Japan.

A number of Japanese people over the years have told me (even bragged to me) how much more advanced they are. Then act like it.

2 ( +9 / -7 )

"A number of Japanese people over the years have told me (even bragged to me) how much more advanced they are. Then act like it."

They did. Hundred of Japanese people showed up to support the Koreans, I wonder if any Korean/Chinese would have done the same?

-8 ( +8 / -16 )

There are some good things & bad things happening here. First off anyone who wants to have speeches & book a place should be able to do so, IF they have a history of promoting hate, THEN by all means DO NOT allow them a venue.

If they haven't committed a crime yet they should be free to set up thing, THEN if they spout HATE, they should face the LAW!! At the same time protestors of said speeches are free to PROTEST, if they get wound up & commit violence etc, THEY should pay the price.

But as we see the supposed law has NO TEETH, no penalties......wtf!

Forget the topic of this thread for a second, I do have a problem with anti whatever mobs stopping others from presenting their points of view.

We HAVE to let people SPEAK, if then they screw it up spewing hatred, then by all means charge them, ban them!

But we cant just allow big mobs to stop others from speaking, we NEED to allow people to say what they want & its their to make or mess their cases

4 ( +7 / -3 )

This mayor needs to explain once again why he let a hate group setup shop and then when asked about it, referred to regular meetings and how they are allowed by the city.

Perhaps the mayor also really wanted this meeting too?

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Shutting someone down who is spewing hate speech is not infringing on freedom of speech;

Yes, it is - if the government does it. You can try to spin it as teaching that "hate has consequences," but it is the very definition of infringed freedom of speech. Any number of profound thinkers have noted that it is exactly offensive speech that needs to be protected most.

I despise these anti-Korean cretins as much as anyone. But laws restricting speech as "hate speech" are dangerous by nature and can easily be used to silence political opposition to those obviously immoral and incompetent leaders you mentioned.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

Interesting how the comments here are devolving into exactly the same sort of hate speech described in the article. Educational, in a sad sort of way.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Hate speech is all about perception and who gets to define what it is. Japan should be careful not to follow the Western nations into oblivion.

Anything more than encouraging direct acts of physical violence is a slippery slope to a totalitarian state in my view. People who are prepared to allow the government to arbitrarily define virtually anything as hate speech will regret it in the long run, big time! You are handing far too much to the government.

In saying that, I have no idea if this individual or group were encouraging acts of violence but if so, then I'm glad it was shut down.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Anti-Korean events are the norm in Japan. That is mostly because there is anti-Korean education in Japan that indoctrinates the Japanese to hate Korea. The biggest travesty of all this is that they -- the indoctrinated Japanese accuse Korea of having anti-Japanese education, and they are doing this while they organize anti-Korean rallies. That's like America accusing Canada or being imperialist. Are you kidding me?

Anti-Korean education in Japan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U88VoZ3YnkY

-11 ( +4 / -15 )

Really Matt Hartwell?

But the vast majority of us dont like to use logic. We justs like to scream “bad Japan” whenever we get to.

Oh and your wrong, whatever I personally don’t agree to should be shut down. If I don’t feel a certain way, I’ll also have you know that it upsets me that you do!

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Good to hear. I wonder whether that fat Sakurai had anything to do with it.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

@papigiulio Today 05:57 pm JST

IMO, the most dangerous thing to free speech is when people try to rationalize and categorize away little portions of it in salami-slicing tactics. And I think we should applaud a country that's willing to stand up to that populist pressure (the international pressure on this topic is populist) and favor the defense of the more fundamental, universally useful right.

@borschtToday 07:34 pm JST

Sorry, this position is fundamentally wrong. When speech has consequences, it is no longer free. The government is only the most major threat to freedom of speech, but in most first world countries, they retreat to the background, and the main challengers become either major corporations (like Youtube) or populist movements.

@thepersoniamnowToday 08:03 pm JST

This mayor needs to explain once again why he let a hate group setup shop and then when asked about it, referred to regular meetings and how they are allowed by the city.

What he said is that as a rule, the government permits gatherings, without being very picky about their content. Which is exactly what a government should do.

@IloveCoffeeToday 09:14 pm JST

Not only is that school pretty picked, but what's so bad about the content?

Line 1: Adults should ensure Japan shouldn't lose to other nations and defend the Senkakus, Takeshima and the Northern Territories.

Line 2: China and Korea, who treat Japan as evil, should change their hearts

Line 3: and stop lying in their textbooks.

Line 4: Go go, Abe!

Line 5: It's good the Security legislation passes.

Really, what's so horrible? Yeah, I'm sure they didn't really understand the content of the security legislation, but that doesn't necessarily mean it is a bad idea. Chinese and Koreans aren't exactly being asked to die or leave, just to stop a perceived wrongdoing.

Recently, the term "weaponized narrative" has shown up in the West, basically about how China exploits Western fears of racism to delay their taking defensive actions against a very clear propaganda and sharp power offensive effort. Hmm, haven't we seen this before? In Japan? It was so cute when it was only Japan, wasn't it? Not so cute when their claws are coming for you...

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Be careful. We've seen this "hate speech laws" operating as totalitarian tools to shut down opposing views. In countries like the UK merely being critical of immigration or certain religions can get you in trouble.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Commanteer, I completely agree.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Great to see people standing up for what is right. Bravo to them.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

He said I couldn't tell anyone because when he went job hunting, nobody would hire him if they know about his Korean genes.

Oh my goodness!!!

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

First of all, I believe in freedom of speech, doesn't matter if it's Japan.

Second, that Japanese protesters were able to fight back against these anti-Korean bigots will be conveniently brushed aside by the world media. Yup, there were Japanese citizens that spoke out and acted against racists, but since this does not fit the world narrative that "all" Japanese are xenophobic hate mongers, this will be ignored. As an example, I watched an Arirang news clip on anti-Korean marches in Japan and the report never showed the Japanese counter protesters speaking out against the hate mongers. Anyways good for those citizens speaking out against racism.

Last, while I don't condone racism, in the context of things let's not forget that citizens in Korea and China routinely engage in racist vitriol against all things Japan. No nation is immune to such ignorance.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Really Matt Hartwell?

But the vast majority of us dont like to use logic. We justs like to scream “bad Japan” whenever we get to.

It does amaze me how many gaijin expats are anti-Japanese on this site to be honest. I am critical of certain Japanese policies, but I would say I am pro-Japan overall.

Oh and your wrong, whatever I personally don’t agree to should be shut down. If I don’t feel a certain way, I’ll also have you know that it upsets me that you do!

Yup. Seems very childish to me. Like people never really entered adulthood. When I was growing up you soon learnt that people say awful things all the time. As a more classical British liberal, the common view was you should allow racists and bigots to voice their view so they can be ostracized, demeaned and generally made to look the fool. There was no idea to prevent people speaking freely. People moved on. Now everything is taken as hate speech and there is no logical limit to where that idea goes. That's what makes it so incredibly dangerous. If you simply say no speech that encourages physical violence will be tolerated, but leave everything else open, then you have clear line in the sand that makes logical sense.

There is no line in the sand with the trend in these laws now globally. Not only does that make it a lawyers playground, it also leaves the field wide open for any government to abuse the power to define what is acceptable, for individuals to defame others with ease and ruin their lives etc etc.

We don't need restrictions on free speech, we need better forms of media and fact checking combined with a true embrace of the notion of the sovereign individual. If you teach people to judge the character of individuals over their group identity, you cannot fail to build a better society. Unfortunately we are moving back to tribalism. It wont end well, guaranteed.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Be careful. We've already seen this "hate speech laws" used in a totalitarian fashion to shut down opposing views. In the UK right now, merely being critical of immigration or certain religion can get you in trouble.

Cheering these policies without reservations is childish, to say the least.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The mayor allowed the event to take place in an education and culture hall.

What a way to display culture! What a way to educate!

Is this mayor fit for purpose?

Nice that the weeaboos on here get to see the other side of japan. The one that is hidden oh so well.

Yes, Tourists coming to Japan need to be aware of the more unpleasant side of this country.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

LOL Anything that says Japan was culpable for WWII atrocities is labeled as being "anti-japanese." I guess blasting on loud speakers to kill Koreans and calling them cockroaches is "anti-korean??" This is truly pathetic that this is happening in 2018 Japan.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pE2ms1P56I

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

IloveCoffee

A private website can do whatever it wants.

No they cannot and are governed by laws. Last month the EU introduced strict data protection laws because of FB.

Germany starts enforcing a law that fines social media companies for not deleting hate speech on their platforms.

Internet companies like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube-parent Google will now have just a 24-hour window to remove offending posts.

The law carries fines of up to $60 million if companies fail to remove posts that are "obviously illegal."

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

what happened to kicking back and having a BBQ on Sundays? Tired of people forcing their views on other people

4 ( +5 / -1 )

With what has become of free speech in much of the west in the name of 'anti hate speech' I view this event in japan with misgivings.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Multi-Culturalism and Diversity in play.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

IloveCoffeeJune 4 09:14 pm JST

Anti-Korean events are the norm in Japan. That is mostly because there is anti-Korean education in Japan that indoctrinates the Japanese to hate Korea.

Anti-Korean education in Japan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U88VoZ3YnkY

That's a lot of hogwash. You really should educate yourself.

http://digitalcollections.sit.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4108&context=capstones

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZHy2NDU9R8

http://www7.plala.or.jp/juraian/antijapanedu/antijapanedu.htm

https://amesho161616.wordpress.com/2014/02/27/tragedy-of-extreme-anti-japanese-education-in-s-korea/

The difference between Japan and South Korea is that when an anti-Korean event like this occurs in Japan there are people who attend to protest against it. When an anti-Japan event occurs in South Korea nobody protests against it.

1 ( +9 / -8 )

I always think those who say they do not agree with such groups but it's still freedom of speech, have something to hide.

Whenever I have pressed someone on this point I have always turned out to be right.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

I am going to set the free speech argument aside and only comment on the what the protesters did to stop the anti Korean rally.

I have lived in Japan 2 decades. I never thought I would see the day when something like this would occur.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

'I have always turned out to be right.' This is the problem, all-knowing individuals deciding what is best for the rest of us.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

A welcome act that serves to show the underlying racism and xenophobia that goes unnoticed in japan. The fact that the usual fanboys get to see this fact, is cream on the cake.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Matt Hartwell

Agreed! Look at my thumbs downs...lol

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Freedom of speech is guaranteed by Chapter III, Article 21 of the Japanese constitution. There are few exemptions to this right and a very broad spectrum of opinion is tolerated by the media and authorities.

Article 21:

Freedom of assembly and association as well as speech, press and all other forms of expression are guaranteed. (集会、結社及び言論、出版その他一切の表現の自由は、これを保障する。)

No censorship shall be maintained, nor shall the secrecy of any means of communication be violated. (検閲は、これをしてはならない。通信の秘密は、これを侵してはならない。)

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Except when a self righteous group prevents it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Rob

In the UK right now, merely being critical of immigration or certain religion can get you in trouble.

freedom of speech in the UK is only allowed by default not by a right

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Good on the protestors, although I bet the same people that demand anti-Korean hate speech be allowed under freedom of speech decried the protests. As I suspected, Japan's hate-speech laws would be toothless, and nothing more than an attempt to look good as other nations actually DO something about hate (exceptions, of course, like the US, which is moving backwards) and are watching those who don't. They passed the laws, fobbed off responsibility on who enforces it, and do nothing as anti-Korean and other hate continues to, in fact, grow.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

freedom of speech in the UK is only allowed by default not by a right

Its not guaranteed by law and is therefore subjective. Meaning the government can restrict it any time.

There is only one country that has anything approaching freedom of speech, albeit inperfect and that is the United States.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

aren't there laws to prohibit the DB level of audio output or can anyone take a p/a

and scream in front of police and not be arrested? Does one need a permit to do this

and how does one obtain it? Knowing Japan regulations about everything I presume

the applicant would have to disclose the nature of their p/a message beforehand.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

opps my comment was in response to @ melonbarmonster June 5  03:18 am JST

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pE2ms1P56I showing a Japanese girl screaming

anti-Korean hate-filled garbage in front of Japanese police.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Last week the ultra nationalists held a rally in Kobe which was heavily protested but it didn’t make the local tv news.

The rightists advocate killing Koreans! Where does that stop? Killing Chinese,Americans or any other foreigners that displease them?

How can local governments allow this unless they are in fear of being attacked?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Basically, abuse of foreigners is tacitly tolerated by the authorities here.

Japan has a long way to go to be a progressive society.....

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Re my above comment I have always turned out to be right about the free speechers in that they are always racists and somewhat sympathetic to the group's views. I have yet to find someone who isn't.

(I'm talking about the Japanese context of course)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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