national

Inspiring or inconsiderate? Foreigner plays guitar for train passengers stranded by typhoon

93 Comments
By Steven Simonitch

On Sept 30, Typhoon Jelawat struck the eastern part of Aichi Prefecture, and then proceeded to move north, causing flight delays and affecting public transportation across the eastern region of the main island.

In Tokyo, train schedules throughout the city were disrupted and one section of the JR Chuo Line was even forced to shut down before trains could make it back to their stations, trapping passengers inside the cars until weather conditions improved.

Now, I’m sure you’ll agree with me that nothing can ruin a day (week?) like being held up in an unexpected transportation or traffic accident. The general mood among passengers in those stranded cars must have been pretty sour. Which is why it’s amazing one foreigner had the pluck to take out his guitar and start serenading his fellow passengers while they waited for the storm to pass.

The video above was uploaded to YouTube and Nico Nico Douga on Thursday, where it quickly grabbed the attention of viewers.

According to the video, it was night when the trains stopped and the air inside the train was tense as people were tired and anxious to get home. That’s when the performer, identified as Andrew Sloman, took his acoustic guitar in hand and attempted to relax the mood with a spontaneous performance of his own song, “Tokyo Rising.”

As the sound of acoustic guitar echoed through the train car, a small crowd formed to watch Sloman and even sing along with him during the chorus.

While in the video it appears he succeeded in lifting people’s spirits, Japanese internet opinion over Sloman’s actions is split. While some people applaud him for livening up an otherwise miserable situation, many Japanese Internet users criticize Sloman for showing a lack of consideration for people on the train who may have wanted to wait out the storm in silence.

One person comments: “He’s able to get away with this because he’s a foreigner. All Japanese people know that there are unspoken rules when riding the train: turn your phone on silent and don’t answer it, keep your voice low, keep the doorways clear. If a Japanese person did this, they’d get bashed without hesitation.“

Yeah… Even if they know the unspoken rules, certainly not all Japanese people follow them. Regardless, the older Japanese man sitting to the left of Sloman with his earphones in seems to find the music a nuisance, and it’s difficult to imagine a Japanese people getting the same rise out of the crowd by doing thing.

Source: Nico Nico Douga, YouTube, Andrew Sloman

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93 Comments
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I get that there are unspoken rules in the train and that you should respect these rules, but sometimes a little unexpected entertainment can be fun right. Why is there the need to start critizing this man and call him inconsiderate, why such a denounceful atitude towards the unexpected and slightly out of place? What is so horrifying about this, they do this in other places all the time, it makes life a little bit more eventful.

I get that you would be annoyed if someone's musicplayer is very loud or when someone is talking on the phone in a normal situation, but come on you're all stuck in a trian for a longer period of time why not have a little fun, why such a compelling need to condemn this and behave like soulless robots... you can always move somewhere else if you can't stand it....

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Yes, the fellow i sitting next to him isn't really feeling it, is he. And he is a very foreigner. But, a guitar and a little song can be very good for one's spirits now and again. A couple of songs couldn't have hurt too much.

5 ( +7 / -1 )

As a foreigner I would of been annoyed as well having to listen to this Guy if I were stuck on the train.

-1 ( +12 / -14 )

the air inside the train was tense as people were tired and anxious to get home.

Isn't it always like that anyway on Japanese trains during rush hours?

17 ( +18 / -2 )

One or two songs might be ok, I can appreciate that some people would like that sort of thing in that situation. If I'm there, I'd probably rather not have him playing and singing though.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

If he sound's good then cool, but if he not well practiced then uncool....Killjoy's live and let live...

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Follow the rules like a mindless automaton.....

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Honestly, no, he shouldn't do it.I guess it was ok add he it's a foreigner, but a Japanese might get a:"urusai naa omae" (which is more impolite imho) from some grumply old guy.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

No music or singing during an emergency! Some Japanese people must learn to adapt to the situation and lighten up.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

When in Japan, be Japanese, atleast in Public. Doesn't mean you have to be a brainless automaton.

8 ( +11 / -5 )

Ooo tough one... (As a someone who does play guitar, never ever in a train through occasionally in a park)

Hmm the honest truth it really depends if he's any good.

A few songs quietly then make some conversation with whom ever enjoys it, seems reasonable.

I do understand keeping quiet and respectful on the train though, it's a draining and awful enough experience without unwanted yelling, singing, game noises and so on.

In this case pretty harmless and booooo to the newspapers for trying to be so devisive

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Well, One cultural difference is that poor musicians in Japan, and there are quite a few, tend to avoid playing in closed places where their audience can't walk away, while this poor musician (way off pitch) wants to share his musical inability with the world, whether they like it or not. Still, to be kinder, he probably meant to cheer people up, and maybe he succeeded with some.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

All Japanese people know that there are unspoken rules when riding the train: turn your phone on silent and don’t answer it, keep your voice low, keep the doorways clear.

I'd say knowing the rules and ignoring them is worse than simply wanting to lighten up in a trying situation? The folk standing nearby seem to be enjoying the song, even singing along with the chorus. Well done that man.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

He’s able to get away with this because he’s a foreigner. All Japanese people know that there are unspoken rules when riding the train: turn your phone on silent and don’t answer it, keep your voice low, keep the doorways clear. If a Japanese person did this, they’d get bashed without hesitation

The usual stereotypes. Anyone who uses the train here will see Japanese people use their phones anywhere on the trains, including the areas where it is clearly marked they shouldn't. See a bunch of housewives or school kids form a group and chat quite loudly without consideration for the people around them. And if someone complains at them the offender often gets angry back at them. Yep, gotta love the stereotypes. Just keep telling the same old stereotypes and try to get away with it.

Having said that, I would rather have him not play if I was on the same train as him.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Another self-centered foreigner giving gaijin a bad name. At least he could have played quietly so others who didn't want to listen could turn up their earphones and drown him out. That song is not relaxing, nor worth listening too. If I were stuck in his vicinity, I too could easily become more tense, with the negative energy flowing around the car, and want to break a window to get away from him. Save it for a situation where the audience is not captive.

2 ( +9 / -7 )

Geez worried about a little music on a train and some foreigner breaking the "peace"?

I suppose then that the folks that thought that what this guy did was wrong probably appreciate the election vans and nationalist trucks speakers blaring out their noise to be smoothing too.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

“He’s able to get away with this because he’s a foreigner. All Japanese people know that there are unspoken rules when riding the train: turn your phone on silent and don’t answer it, keep your voice low, keep the doorways clear. If a Japanese person did this, they’d get bashed without hesitation.“

The problem, commenter, is that there are many Japanese people who do NOT follow these "rules" and will freak out if you point that out to them. People put their shopping on the seats next to them, even if the train's relatively full. People leave their ringtones on and while some will keep a conversation short and somewhat muted, others will not. People sit with their legs spread wide (me, of course), take up priority seating when people with priorities need it, drink and eat on trains, use loud voices, carry those Chinese bells on their bags or canes, and let's forget about enkai season!

Anyway, depending on what mood I was in I would be pretty miffed if the guy did this, but not at the guy himself. I could also see myself slowly getting into it if others seemed to be enjoying it (not making the atmosphere tenser), but I would hope that he'd limit it to one or two songs tops. After that I think it becomes a little self-indulging and inconsiderate.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Everyone keeps commenting under the impression that all those people were stuck in the car with him... Correct me if I'm wrong, but despite a train being stranded you can still move freely from car to car if you so wish, right? So if you really are a grinch, you could just move to the car and save yourself (& everyone else) the trouble.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

My feeling is that, if there is someone who finds this worthy of complaint, you truly have a nice life all and all. So some guy played guitar on the train. So what?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

If I were stuck in his vicinity, I too could easily become more tense, with the negative energy flowing around the car, and want to break a window to get away from him. Save it for a situation where the audience is not captive.

It says the train was stopped because of the typhoon. At the end of the video it's clear that the train is at a station, so presumably the audience was not 'captive' - people could move around, get off the train if they wanted. I don't pick up any 'negative energy' flowing round the car' - people are singing along, seemingly enjoying the song.

In the middle of a normal everyday commute though, yes, I can see it might be annoying.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

I agree with mitoguitarman. I come from a country (France) where people play violin, accordion, etc in the trains and it's a real nuisance. Plus, the fact that anybody these days can listen to music from mobiles and mp3 players. I find it arrogant to assume that your music will appeal to every random passenger. And lastly, if you really watch the video, you'll see that the only ones smiling are probably his friends. The others mind their business and one girl even walk through the scene probably thinking something like "jama gaijin!!". Well, all thumbs down for me.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

If I'd been sitting next to that guy, I would have got up and moved. He's assuming everybody has the same interests as him. As one sign I saw on a local train said, "One person's music is another person's noise."

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Girls being groped must stay silent, part of the unspoken rules.

Trouble is Japanese aren't encouraged to do anything spontaneous so yeah this guy would alarm some.

Good on him.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

you know someone could always say..

Hey buddy we don't really encourage singing and playing instruments on the train.

If his response is, "oh I'm sorry, didn't mean to offend", its over, if he then acts like a jackass.. then well its a different story.

As for the rules of "Japanese society" I see many more Ojisan and Obasan breaking the "rules" with phones not on silent and no talking on the phone than anyone.. so to suggest that these "rules" are universally respected by Japanese people is plainly inaccurate. As I said, I do see the need for these unspoken rules, especially on the train and is a simple extension of, "do unto others as you would have them do unto you".

And why the thumbs down?

Because I suggested as I always do that the world isn't black and white, suggesting there is a balance between wanting to break the boredom and respecting others on the train.

It wasn't that fantastic musically but not totally awful, and in-fact the loudest part is when the other Japanese people joined in.

Or because I said I sometimes play guitar in the park? Why do I play quietly away from others in the park.. so as not to annoy my neighbours, and treat their right for peaceful enjoyment of their home with respect as I would wish they would do for me.

So, lets see if today this story gets more comments than the one about nuclear power plants restarting, or the latest inflammatory comments from Ishihara.. get some perspective people, get angry about things worth getting angry about.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

If more joined him, and a jam session ensued, the "stranded in typhoon time" might've gone a lot faster.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Wow. Some people are really just Debbie Downers, aren't they? I get annoyed by loud teenagers talking, or some oyaji putting his stinky bare feet up on the seat across all the time, but I still grit my teeth and bear it. The guy did his best to make the best of a bad situation, and yeah, while the guy next to him looks unimpressed, hopefully he'd look around at the others around him to are clearly cheered up by the music. Notice he also has his earbuds in and is paying attention to his cell phone, so he's found a way to enjoy himself until the annoyance passes.

Some people really do need to lighten up and break social rules from time to time. I keep hearing that people shouldn't talk on their phones on trains, but that doesn't stop some obaachan from yacking away to whoever on her keitai when it rings loudly enough for everyone to hear. Oh yeah, don't forget about no eating or drinking, unless you're the wasted salary man across from me munching on some potato chips. I think we can all agree that a bit of music is more pleasing than either or those meiwakus. Sometimes, you've just gotta live a little!

2 ( +4 / -2 )

As if Japanese people don't do things that are grossly inconsiderate to foreigners on an near-hourly basis. Standing on the street? "Please teach English." Meeting for the first time? "Are you married? Eeeeeh...! Why not!?" Sitting on the train? moves to different seat Buying bento for literally the 200th time from the same shop? "Chopsticks okay?"

As foreigners we are instructed not to view these incidents negatively. "They are trying to be nice." or "It's their kindness." Fine okay, buy does the simple fact that this guy is a foreigner mean that this interaction only goes one way? If that's your thought, then it's no wonder Japan's worldview is stuck in the 1920's and it's global clout has plummeted. Welcome to the world, Japan. Not every abides by your arcane rules of politeness 100% of the time.

Furthermore, I think some question is raised that this individual didn't know he could've been being rude. I would believe (but has yet to be proven) that he knew full well. It was an extraordinary circumstance, so he did something out of the typical convention. "It's his kindness!"

2 ( +5 / -3 )

@majimekun

I come from a country (France) where people play violin, accordion, etc in the trains and it's a real nuisance.

To be fair, I think you should mention that in France, it's not so much to "entertain" people but more to get money. In most cases, it may be their only way of making a livelihood. The train "rules" in Japan are a joke anyway ! NOBODY observes them. I personally wouldn't have the courage to try and liven up a pretty bleak situation but I think it was good of him to try ! As others have said, if you don't like it, move on...

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Lucky he didn't start dancing too or we would have been arrested!

9 ( +10 / -1 )

I would be annoyed. At any given moment I have with several hundred million hours of e-books to read, music to listen to, mobile games to play, or Japanese to study. Most japnese people have some form of time waster with the too. I would just like to enjoy my time wasting material in quiet.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Mighty rude, in my book!-But I'd trade places with JR riders anytime!-I'm from N.Y. & throughout my ride I put up with acrobatic acts, panhandlers who proclaim they could be doing worse things And Roving Conga Drum Trios! People are the same Everywhere so live & let live,folks!
4 ( +4 / -0 )

When in Rome I suppose....

It's cultural. And also it depends on whether his song was good or not. If he had sung 'Ashita Ga Aru' or something, who knows if it would have gone down well.

In Britain, I've heard one or two good players on the tube. Then there are the amusing drunks with their dogs. But that's another country.

If you want to compare Japanese and British reactions to spontaneity and a certain eccentricity, take a look at this dinner party on the London Underground:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ywLhNwSBizE

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"there are unspoken rules on the train.... keep the doorways clear"

Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

I have yet to see this rule followed, just like the rule "Wait for people to get off the train before getting on."

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@FightingViking

As others have said, if you don't like it, move on...

The problem is that a train is a public space and one shouldn't be allowed to do anything forcing someone else to "move on" as you say.

Just simple common sense here.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I thought it was really rude of the guy sitting next to him to ignore him and continue to listen to his earphones.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

I'm sure this guy had good intentions, but what is funny and good for him, might not be funny for others. It's still a train and he should keep in silence. What about the people that didn't want to listen to his performance? They have the right not to be disturbed. Honestly I don't like this kind of "don't worry, be happy like me". Maybe my own way of not being worry and happy is by reading a book or playing a game in peace, not by listening to his guitar.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Playing guital and singing inside the train or any public utility is not nice. It will cause public annoyance and the sound like mosquitoes buzzing inside the ear of the passengers.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Just another arrogant foreigner dancing, singing or somehow performing for a captive Japanese audience with an attitude that says "I'm gonna force these poor, lifeless, sad people to have a great time!" End result is what you see in the video; the foreigner and his friends look very pleased with themselves while the majority of Japanese suffer the twit in silence. The foreign community cause in general? One step up, two steps back.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

@hoserfella, what makes you think those others were his friends?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

matching little outfits, knowing smiles. What makes you think they weren't?

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

They clearly are his friends. One is a foreigner and the other one handles another guitar. And the guy who took the viso might be one too.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Geez, talk about a bunch of Negative Nellies! Oh, it's so much better to sit in silence brewing on the bad luck.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Thanks, hatsoff for that delightful link.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Three considerations:

Captive vs. non-captive (as Cleo pointed out)

Vocal vs. instrumental music

Talent vs. hack
3 ( +3 / -0 )

Tricky. In an emergency situation I can see how a musician might lighten the air as time passed, but having a captive audience is a double-edged sword. If someone is seriously talented, people generally react well, even if the performance is in unusual circumstances. If it is, frankly, shit, then people are likely to complain and maybe blame other factors, such as innappropriate foreign-ness! Some musicians just don't know when to stop, and start banging out a tune at the drop of a hat which can be annoying. Then again, every audience member is a harsh critic when they want to be. The train carriage scenario definitely requires all concerned to read the room effectively and judge when performance/criticism are appropriate.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

This is why I need to proof-read: (from my last post, when talking about bad Japanese manners in regard to the 'rules') "...People sit with their legs spread wide (me, of course),"

What I MEANT to say was "men, of course", not "me".

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I would have to kn ow the guy to judge but my first thought is definitely 'just another conceited gaijin/musician'.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

The train carriage scenario definitely requires all concerned to read the room effectively and judge when performance/criticism are appropriate.

zenkan - In a perfect world, I would agree. But patronizing, obnoxious foreigners are incapable of judging the feelings of anyone else.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Everybody needs to lighten up. He played and sang a song on a train that was stuck. Life can be a little more fun if people could appreciate a little spontaneity from time to time.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

smithinjapan:

This is why I need to proof-read: (from my last post, when talking about bad Japanese manners in regard to the 'rules') "...People sit with their legs spread wide (me, of course),"

What I MEANT to say was "men, of course", not "me".

Thanks for the clarification. Have to say that I agreed with your post. Don't worry, we'll get back to our normal arguing in the political threads. ;)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Everybody needs to lighten up. He played and sang a song on a train that was stuck. Life can be a little more fun if people could appreciate a little spontaneity from time to time.

I'm sure everyone agrees with this in principle but that doesn't mean it applies to this situation.

This guy was probably just trying to promote himself and thanks to the massive amount of views on the video, he probably has.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Start playing when people are tired, dirty and cant leave = dumb idea.

Theres a time and a place and this wasnt it. I listen to the music I want, when i want to and if I dont like the music being played in public, I am free to leave. Because I wasnt free to leave in this situation, I would find it extremely rude to force me to listen.

I thought it was really rude of the guy sitting next to him to ignore him and continue to listen to his earphones.

Nice joke.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I would hate to be on a train, bus or subway with some goof like that singing and strumming and smirking away--he sure does not sound very talented., Nothing to do with whether or not I am in Japan or not. ,

3 ( +3 / -0 )

hoserfella: "zenkan - In a perfect world, I would agree. But patronizing, obnoxious foreigners are incapable of judging the feelings of anyone else."

How is that limited to foreigners?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

If a Japanese person did this, they’d get bashed without hesitation.

lol. No they wouldn't. Everyone would stare blankly ahead, or fiddle with their phone and pretend this "nuisance" didn't exist. I guess this means, like, in the way these annoying little Bosuzoku doobs get bashed...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This was inconsiderate, selfish and arrogant. No doubt about it. All he was thinking was--I will play MY cool music and surely everyone will like it and feel relaxed like ME!

2 ( +5 / -3 )

smithinjapan - It doesn't apply to foreigners only, but I am referring to the foreigners like this guy. The type who need even more attention than they enjoy by just being a foreigner in Japan.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

But we Japanese people have rules that blah blah blah... Get out of the norm for once!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

He was looking for face time in the hope of being " discovered" and generating another revenue stream. I'm fussy about my music and I'm sure his music was not my taste.But then I could move to the next carriage.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

His intentions were purely for the sake of bringing a cheerful mood. Unfortunately, some people may have thought it was uncomfortable. At the same time though, it would be nice to offer some entertainment for the passengers, like on the Yamanote Line. If JR would place t.v. monitors in every train so that people know what's going on, I believe this can help alleviate some of the tension in the atmosphere. This guitarist then would feel compelled not to play his guitar......

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Well it would seem that even if he were singing Japanese standards some of the mindless drones would still object. I am an accomplished musician but I would personally not have done it. It was nothing more than sontaneous entertainment to pass the moment. Some posters act as if they knew the guy personally with their one sided comments. This situation highlights one of many things Japanese need to lighten up on.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

hoserfella... knowing smiles or enjoying smiles? matching outfits or simply standard western clothes? -.- Did you think that asian woman with the gray top and purple pants was part of their lil gang too? get real...

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

hoserfella... knowing smiles or enjoying smiles? matching outfits or simply standard western clothes? -.- Did you think that asian woman with the gray top and purple pants was part of their lil gang too? get real...

jumpultimatestars - majimekun said it best. The guy was there with his friends. Probably the same people who will dress up on Halloween and ride the Yamanote line in their self-appointed job of spreading joy in gloomy old Japan.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

ugh i hate it when those singers do that -_- so long too. i would blast my mp3 volume so much lol DIRENGREY!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

You say gloomy old Japan facetiously, yet knowing full well that Japan has one of the highest suicide and depression rates in the world, right?

Yes, some joy SHOULD be spread somehow, and I don't see anything offensive about dressing up in funny costumes.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

If this ever happens to me, I'm going to try to soothe people stranded on the train too.

They will really enjoy the sounds from my bagpipes.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Pretentious twunt. As if it wouldnt be bad enough being stuck on a train this gorm breaks out his guitar and assumes folks want to listen to his own material. Twunt.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

I am pretty sure he was an american from his appearance and his demeanor. It was a very selfish and silly thing to do, but I imagine many there understood he just did not know the proper way to behave. If i had been there i would have politely asked him to shut up. But I wasn't. So, i am sorry for this. Really not much more to say.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

Hahahahaha... what's all the fuzz about this man singing while everyone is trapped inside a train due to bad weather. I guess if he is Paul McCartney or George Benson singing a song or two to ease the tension of being trapped, I am sure no one will be harsh crticizing his actions. Her...har...har...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

“He’s able to get away with this because he’s a foreigner. All Japanese people know that there are unspoken rules when riding the train: turn your phone on silent and don’t answer it, keep your voice low, keep the doorways clear. If a Japanese person did this, they’d get bashed without hesitation.“

Get bashed without hesitation? If that is true, such a culture of reacting to such things through violence is nothing for this Japanese commentator to be proud of. This bloke was just trying to bring a little cheer and good on him. Shame on the poker-faced few who grumbled about it.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Hush ..hush ..hush... please stop criticizing the man. I am sure he meant good to ease the boredom and tension while being stranded. I wonder if the one singing a song or two is Paul McCartney or Chuck Berry. I am sure there won't be any untoward reactions... I guess we humans are born critics, whiners and practice hypocrisy Har...har...har..

1 ( +4 / -3 )

"it's still a train and he should keep in silence"

This wasn't a morning train, this was an evening train, and evening trains are definitely not silent.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

There's worse things you can do.

Would have been interesting if he played "ue o muite ..."

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Some of the people who find the music a "nuisance" are themselves a "nuisance" to many!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

He should have played "Ashita ga Aru," I like that one.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Since Japan is a democratic nation, I assumed freedom of expression is still tolerated ?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Nice to know that, "All Japanese people know that there are unspoken rules when riding the train: turn your phone on silent and don’t answer it, keep your voice low, keep the doorways clear." I guess those unspoken rules don't include anything about the rampant groping of women by men?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It's a little presumptuous to assume people will like your song. Imagine this story but substitute "guitar" and "singing" for "beatbox" and "rapping".

You should enjoy the right to your tastes and preferences by keeping them to yourself.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

It seems no good deed ever goes unpunished

1 ( +3 / -3 )

I wouldn't have been able to hear him due to my earphones always being on. Keeps me from having to listen to all the cackling of the inconsiderate old hens that are so common on the line I use.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

What sounds good to one person may sound like crap to someone else. If he was a good singer I probably would have enjoyed listening to him - depending upon my mood at the time. However, if I was pissed at being stuck on the train and if he sucked, I might have wanted to wrap that guitar around his head.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Inspiring. Way to live man! "One good thing about music, when it hits you feel no pain." - Nesta Robert Marley

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

As the sound of acoustic guitar echoed through the train car, a small crowd formed to watch Sloman and even sing along with him during the chorus.

You mean the guys carrying musical instruments and wearing the same pork pie hats? Yeah, they thought he was great.

These guys were probably telling everyone back home about their big show in Japan. Even bigger than the stuck elevator show last month.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

One passenger who witnessed the performance said "The nail that sticks up, gets hammered down.... unfortunately, I could not find a hammer."

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It's a rather inane song, with a repetitive chorus hoping to excite a swarm of drones, perhaps?

The strumming isn't bad and the guy seems genuine enough, if perhaps a bit opportunistic his mindless song.

Anyway, he didn't offend many people, so it wasn't a great travesty, at any rate.

And some people seemed to enjoy the interaction.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

"Typhoon Jelawat"

Typhoon Jelawat? I thought typhoons in Japan were all labeled Number nantoka...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Would have been interesting if he played "ue o muite ..."

arukou!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

people might have been more impressed by a little jangara shamisen japanese blues music.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Geezzzzz.... are you still blogging about this guitar man? hehehehe Get back to work or find something useful to do .

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

It would have been better if it was a shakuhachi. That's what I would have been wielding anyway. Everyone likes it, because it is 渋い。Guitar is cliche.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Now I have seen the video, body language tell's it all, He seemed to be finding a comfort zone playing and singing, overall I found it very charming, However the gentleman next to him, seemed to be out of his comfort zone, and did'nt like the attention, so he ignored it...so the answer is some liked it and sang with the chorus, other's blocked it out and completly ignored him....

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I'm going to start keeping a harmonica in my bag. That'll get 'em dancing.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

If you have a problem with this, you have no soul and have been conditioned away from the basic enjoyment of life that all humans would have if they hadn’t been mud washed by modern society - a way of life that has only existed for a fraction of the time humans have been on this planet.

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