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Int'l team captures footage of sunken Japanese WWII aircraft carrier

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From what I've read the battle of midway wasn't a major defeat

Lost 4 irreplaceable fleet carriers and failed to achieve the major objective.

Never went on the offense again.

But sure, not a “major” defeat. SMH

Risk taking and fortune have nothing to do with the degree of the loss.

20 ( +20 / -0 )

OTSUKARESAMADESUToday 08:21 am JST

In the battle, Japan suffered a major defeat as U.S. forces had decrypted the Asian country's communication code, allowing the location and strength of a Japanese attack to be determined

From what I've read the battle of midway wasn't a major defeat

Rather some desperate measures by US forces and sheer luck

Cracking that code wasn't sheer luck. Some nice rewriting of history there.

19 ( +20 / -1 )

OTSUKARESAMADESUToday  08:21 am JST

From what I've read the battle of midway wasn't a major defeat

Rather some desperate measures by US forces and sheer luck

Don't know what nonsense you've been reading but Midway was the turning point for Imperial Japanese offensive capability for multiple reasons.

16 ( +18 / -2 )

From what I've read the battle of midway wasn't a major defeat

Ask the veteran Japanese pilots who had nowhere to land when their ships were ablaze. That would even the score in the air as Japan would have to train new pilots - something the US had begun on a massive scale not to mention ship building that would leave the IJN behind.

15 ( +16 / -1 )

Japan suffered a major defeat as U.S. forces had decrypted the Asian country's communication code...

It was a lot more complicated than that. Nimitz and his officers employed much better strategy, among many other things, while the Japanese underestimated US morale and logistics.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

OTSUKARESAMADESUToday 08:21 am JST

In the battle, Japan suffered a major defeat as U.S. forces had decrypted the Asian country's communication code, allowing the location and strength of a Japanese attack to be determined

> From what I've read the battle of midway wasn't a major defeat

> Rather some desperate measures by US forces and sheer luck

I think the Japanese themselves would say it was a major defeat. If I were you, I'd try reading true history. Spouting nonsense found in dime store novels and revisionist history can make one look quite foolish.

13 ( +15 / -2 )

I was referring to the events of the battle itself and not the obvious outcome !

Just to be pedantic, you said it wasn’t a “major defeat”, which clearly refers to the outcome and not the events of the battle itself.

While its true that luck played a role, I don’t think any serious historian would argue the battle wasn’t a major defeat for Japan.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

If U.S forces had deciphered the IJ Navy's code during the June 1942 Battle of Midway, they could have already deciphered it and known that the IJ task forces were approaching Hawaii to attack Pearl Harbor. Franklin Roosevelt let it happen, though, for he had wanted the U.S. to enter the Pacific war very earnestly and help Churchill's Great Britain. He might have drawn a bigger picture than that.

This is just a nonsensical conspiracy theory with zero historical evidence to back it up. There is no evidence that the Americans were able to read Japanese naval code before Pearl Harbor, all evidence clearly shows that it took cryptographers months of work after they entered the war to just be able to read a fraction of it by the time Midway happenned,

11 ( +13 / -2 )

OTSUKARESAMADESU

The Battle of Midway was a catastrophic defeat for the Imperial Japanese Navy. There is no point arguing that fact. Please don't take it personally, accept it professionally and enjoy the rest of your day :)

11 ( +11 / -0 )

Sheer luck... and four enemy carriers, a heavy cruiser, and 320 odd planes were sent to the bottom of the Pacific.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

OTSUKARESAMADESUToday 12:50 pm JST

If anyone thinks the battle of midway was won by total superiority then they dont know squat

The Pacific War sure was. I'm so sorry your heroes the Soviets don't get to claim all of the military glory in the world while riding in US boats to the Kurils.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

Anyway how difficult could it be to dive bomb your plane into a target?

Ask a WW2 pilot.

However, four enemy carriers, a heavy cruiser, and 320 odd planes to the bottom of the Pacific due to...

some desperate measures by US forces and sheer luck.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

OTSUKARESAMADESUToday 03:35 pm JST

The Pacific War sure was. I'm so sorry your heroes the Soviets don't get to claim all of the military glory in the world while riding in US boats to the Kurils.

Now that's crossing the line a bit

I suggest putting your manners back where they should be

Iam American and served my country and so have my family members for the past 3 generations.

Well let's see: I see you siding with the dictators in every war of the US from WW2 onwards, including the outlandish claim that Russia and North Korea are democracies. I'd suggest you ask those older family members why they served the country you want eliminated.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Agent_NeoToday 03:50 pm JST

Americans will probably be angry at me, but if I point out, attacking Pearl Harbor by surprise does not violate international law.

Well it wasn't exactly honorable having your diplomats discussing peace the day of a sneak attack. The war crime comes because it was part of an expansionist agenda.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I have a question. Someone here is saying that there was luck involved in finding finding the Japanese fleet.

If they had cracked the code, wouldn't America then be able to find the fleet?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

"In the first six to twelve months of a war with the United States and Great Britain. I will run wild and win victory upon victory. But then, if the war continues after that, I have NO expectation of success." (In a statement to Japanese cabinet minister Shigeharu Matsumoto and Japanese prime minister Fumimaro Konoe.)

Somewhere in the bowels of the San Diego State University Library is a book written around 1938 or 1939 by two Japanese economists who came to much the same conclusion. I stumbled upon it while doing some of my graduate research there. It was an interesting read but their conclusion was that unless Japan utterly defeated the US in the first six months of a war, forcing them to sue for peace, then US industrial might would swamp Japan leading to certain defeat.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The article states that the Akagi was sunk Southeast of Midway island. It was sunk west of north of Midway Island.

The IJN did not plan for a long war, and was short of pilots, even at this stage of the war. Whether or not the American forces had been able to sink the four IJN carriers, the fact that they refused to give up the fight doomed the Japanese war plans. Unlike with the Russian defeat in 1905, the loss of a battle did not signal the end of the war, for either side, in 1941, 1942, 1943, until the very end.

The battle plan for the IJN was not a bad one. It just didn't work.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Whenever I hear "Midway", I feel bitter since the war dragged for another 3 years with insurmountable costs. To put it simply, the defeat at the Midway battle, which left Japan incapacitated in effective war efforts, was an opportunity to terminate the military operations which started 6 months before with Pearl Harbor. It's not a surprise that the military headquarters released the false information on the outcome of this battle, and the public believed that Japan won. Alas....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

It's said that cryptographers or telephone operators called Washington frantically to tell that the IJ task forces were approaching Hawaii but that their calls were simply dismissed.

Oh well, if it was said by someone it must be true, right?

American cryptographers had broken the Japanese diplomatic code (not the navy one) and did decipher the cable to the Japanese embassy breaking off diplomatic relations on Dec. 7th, but nothing in that said anything about Pearl Harbor (and even if it did by the time they had broken it it was already too late to do anything about it). None of that supports your conspiracy theory.

A film footage shows a content Roosevelt in all smiles after announcing to the nation on the radio that the U.S. would declare war against Japan.

This is just stupid. Just because Roosevelt smiled doesn’t mean that he had advanced knowledge of anything, let alone that he knew in advance that the Japanese would attack Pearl Harbor and was pleased that they had just killed 2400 Americans.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

If you could ask Admiral Yamamoto, Marshal Admiral of the Imperial Japanese Navy, he would have told you, and I quote:

"In the first six to twelve months of a war with the United States and Great Britain. I will run wild and win victory upon victory. But then, if the war continues after that, I have NO expectation of success." (In a statement to Japanese cabinet minister Shigeharu Matsumoto and Japanese prime minister Fumimaro Konoe.)

Sure enough, the Battle of Midway, June 4th - 7th, which ended EXACTLY SIX MONTHS to the day after the "infamous" bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941, signaled the time from which Japan was constantly on the DEFENSIVE. The tables had turned with the Battle of Midway. Japan had run wild a mere six months. But from that point on, all Japan could do was to delay the inevitable defeat which was sure to come.

Sometimes, the events that unfold are so amazing, and history can be so astonishingly precise (like Yamamoto's prewar prediction), that it's rather eerie.

Japan should've paid more attention to the American-trained Isoruku Yamamoto. He knew America's power.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

OssanAmericaSep. 18 06:05 pm JST

TaiwanIsNotChinaToday  05:30 pm JST

Agent_NeoToday 03:50 pm JST

Americans will probably be angry at me, but if I point out, attacking Pearl Harbor by surprise does not violate international law.

Well it wasn't exactly honorable having your diplomats discussing peace the day of a sneak attack. The war crime comes because it was part of an expansionist agenda.

Pearl Harbor may or may not have been a surprise attack by design. Japan had sent an official Declaration of War to the Japanese Embassy in Washington DC to be handed to US Secretary of State Cordell Hull. But with a delay resulting from de-coding the message, the Declaration ended up being handed to Cordell Hull over 7 hours after the actual attack had started. Hawaii being 6 hours ahead of Washington DC.

A declaration of war to be delivered without enough time to even move a few ships is a sneak attack.

Regardless, the US most certainly used the term "sneak attack" to raise national ire against Japan and direct US public sentiment towards US entry into WWII.

And rightly so. 2,000 sailors killed and a large part of the naval capability of the US destroyed.

Only a day after declaring war on Japan, the US declared war on Germany and Italy as well.

What's this I see here?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_declaration_of_war_against_the_United_States

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_declaration_of_war_onGermany(1941)

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@ OssanAmerica

Contrary to your statement, the United States of America did not declare war on Germany, it was the other way around.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Obviously they were defeated but lets not try to be overly arrogant Yankee style and say it was because the US is majorly superior naval expertise

I have never read a US account of that battle that makes such claims. Every account I have read mentions the US enjoyed several strokes of sheer good luck, including that Enterprise and Hornet remained undetected by the Japanese throughout the battle and thus were not attacked, and that the US was supremely lucky that aircraft from the three aircraft carriers caught the Japanese force during a 15 minute period of indecision on the part of Admiral Nagumo as he mullled whether the next attack would be on Midway with bombs or on a US aircraft carrier with torpedoes, leaving ordnance stacked up in the hangers of the carrier's hanger decks instead of being struck down to magazines where they would have been protected from the dive bombers arriving overhead.

There also some hard luck inasmuch as the attack was not coordinated as it should have been. Ideally the torpedo and dive bombers should arrive together with the fighters for cover. At Midway, the torpedo planes arrived first and with no fighter escort. Very nearly all of them were shot down and their crews killed. But that action brought the Japanese fighters and the aim of their gunners down low to the water. The Japanese didn't see the dive bombers arrive until they were well into their dives and by then it was too late to do anything about it. With all that ordnance stacked up in the hangers it didn't require all that many hits to set off devastating explosions and fires on three of the Japanese carriers. The fourth would be sunk on a subsequent attack.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Agent_NeoToday 01:47 am JST

The United States provided military aid to China, which Japan had been fighting against even before the war, imposed an oil embargo on Japan, and imposed a Hull Note on Japan.

All of which were done to counter Japan's expansionist agenda.

Isn't it correct that the American government was desperate to go to war with Japan at Churchill's request?

Sorry, but sanctions and military aid are not a direct act of war. Of course the US was going to backup it's historical ally the UK as much as possible.

America's war crimes included the mistreatment of Japanese prisoners of war, the massive air raid on Tokyo, the strafing of civilians, and the use of the atomic bomb, a weapon of mass destruction, all in violation of the Geneva Conventions.

You mean the Fourth Geneva Convention signed in 1949? Japan's war crimes include 10 million dead in the Pacific War, most of which were civilians. Also my understanding is Japanese POWs were treated like honored guests compared to what Allied POWs received.

You can't talk about history if you ignore that.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

And rightly so. 2,000 sailors killed and a large part of the naval capability of the US destroyed.

Yes, seven WWI era battleships were sunk along with a couple of destroyers and I believe an oiler but the Japanese didn't touch any of the US Navy's aircraft carriers or cruisers or the vast majority of their destroyer fleet. Those are the ships that would take the war to Japan early in the war winning the battles of Coral Sea and Midway. It was only in 1943 when the US invaded Guadalcanal that the US needed battleships for shore bombardment and by then the US had the two new Washington class ships and the four South Dakota class ships, modern battleships with excellent gunnery as the IJN found out the hard way at the Second Naval Battle of Guadalcanal when USS Washington sank the battleship Kirishima in a night engagement using radar.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Contrary to your statement, the United States of America did not declare war on Germany, it was the other way around.

Nope. US Congress declared war on the Axis Powers, Germany and Italy, on 11 December 1941.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In my opinion, nobody should be diving near, or photographing these wrecks. They are graves.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Franklin Roosevelt let it happen,

And the Philippines too, which was also attacked at the same time, right? LOL. If FDR preposterously kept the Pearl Harbour plan secret, the Japanese still attacked the Philippines, Malaya, the Dutch East Indies, and Hong Kong at the same time. FDR keeping mum on Hawaii have had no effect on the Allies' war declaration.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Desert TortoiseToday 03:06 am JST

Contrary to your statement, the United States of America did not declare war on Germany, it was the other way around.

Nope. US Congress declared war on the Axis Powers, Germany and Italy, on 11 December 1941.

Desert, I usually respect your knowledge, but the text of the declaration itself it says that it is in response to a formal declaration of war by Germany:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_declaration_of_war_onGermany(1941)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Contrary to your statement, the United States of America did not declare war on Germany, it was the other way around.

I supposed the whitewashed you learned taught you differently, but you are sadly incorrect.

On December 11, 1941, the United States Congress declared war on Germany hours after Germany declared war on the United States after the attack on Pearl Harbor by the Empire of Japan.[1] The vote was 88–0 in the Senate and 393–0 in the House.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_declaration_of_war_onGermany(1941)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Useless internet bickering aside.... locating and filming the Akagi is a really important monument from a crucial part of world history, and an amazing feat. Extremely impressive.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

When the IJ task forces arrived in Hawaii, off Oahu, and started attacking Pearl Harbor, on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, to their surprise, they found no aircraft carriers there that had usually been anchored there on Sundays. Why were the carriers not there on that particular Sunday?

One they were not always "typically anchored there on Sundays" and two,

Japanese intelligence was faulty as the carriers werent there due to other commitments.

They weren’t at Pearl Harbor because each of them had previously-scheduled missions to perform.

The Lexington was ferrying fighter aircraft to Midway Island, but when notified of the attack, began searching for the Japanese fleet. However, the IJN strike force was too far to the North, out of the Lexington’s range.

The Enterprise was scheduled to be back in Pearl Harbor on December 6th after delivering fighter aircraft to Wake Island. Fortunately (or unfortunately), she was delayed by bad weather and needing to refuel her escorting destroyers. She arrived in the afternoon on December 7th, several hours after the attack had ended.

The Saratoga had just been refitted at Bremerton Navy Yard in Washington State and was in San Diego to pick up her air group, where she was recalled to Pearl.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It's so strange. I have a child's kimono sleeve showing the Akagi under full steam, from a time when people were obviously still proud of her, the silk sleeve in better condition than the aircraft carrier herself.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@TaiwanIsNotChina

Honored guest? Nice joke!

A famous photo was taken in December 1944 on the deck of the battleship USS New Jersey in the South Pacific, showing a Japanese prisoner of war being bathed before being given clothes, but in front of the public eye. It is clear what his intentions are when he exposes himself completely naked.

There are also photographs of Japanese military POWs who are completely naked in Okinawa.

If you search for other images, you'll find many images of Japanese soldiers being completely naked, but can't you search for them in the box in front of you?

After all, white people probably thought of people of color as nothing more than "monkeys."

The fact that the Japanese military provides military aid to an organization (the Chinese military) in a state of combat is in itself a hostile act. I can understand economic sanctions such as a ban on oil exports, but military aid is completely out.

Even if we were attacked by Japan, of course we could not complain.

In addition, after the war, MacArthur said, ''If the supply of raw materials were cut off, there would be 10 to 12 million people unemployed in Japan. They feared that. Therefore, the motive that drove Japan to war was largely due to "This was done out of necessity for security reasons," he said.

Invasion? MacArthur denies it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Agent_NeoToday 12:27 am JST

@TaiwanIsNotChina

Honored guest? Nice joke!

A famous photo was taken in December 1944 on the deck of the battleship USS New Jersey in the South Pacific, showing a Japanese prisoner of war being bathed before being given clothes, but in front of the public eye. It is clear what his intentions are when he exposes himself completely naked.

There are also photographs of Japanese military POWs who are completely naked in Okinawa.

If you search for other images, you'll find many images of Japanese soldiers being completely naked, but can't you search for them in the box in front of you?

I will assert that being bathed in public is not as harsh as being starved, tortured, and killed:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bataan_Death_March

The fact that the Japanese military provides military aid to an organization (the Chinese military) in a state of combat is in itself a hostile act. I can understand economic sanctions such as a ban on oil exports, but military aid is completely out.

It might be a hostile act but its not an act of war when Japan is the aggressor.

In addition, after the war, MacArthur said, ''If the supply of raw materials were cut off, there would be 10 to 12 million people unemployed in Japan. They feared that. Therefore, the motive that drove Japan to war was largely due to "This was done out of necessity for security reasons," he said.

That's still 60 million employed. Japan had a responsibility to retain good relations with the US and the UK if it was so dependent on them.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

When the IJ task forces arrived in Hawaii, off Oahu, and started attacking Pearl Harbor, on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, to their surprise, they found no aircraft carriers there that had usually been anchored there on Sundays. Why were the carriers not there on that particular Sunday?

Enterprise and Hornet were half a days sail away from Pearl Harbor, returning from Wake Island where they delivered a Marine Air Wing to defend that island. The arrived late at night on 7 December 1941 and their air wings were fired upon by jumpy gunners as they attempted to land at NAS Ford Island (aircraft carriers typically flew off their air wings upon arrival at a major Naval base)

Lexington was likewise at sea on a mission to deliver Marine aircraft to Midway Island.

Saratoga entered an extended overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in October 1940 and completed her post overhaul trials in late November 1941. . She was in port in San Diego to load her air wing when Pearl Harbor was attacked. Her mission was immediately changed to bring more Marine aircraft to Wake Island but she was unable to reach Wake before the garrison was over run by the Japanese invaders. Saratoga was hit by a Japanese torpedo in January 1942 sending her back to Puget Sound for repairs.

Yorktown, Wasp and Ranger were all in the Atlantic Fleet when Pearl Harbor was attacked.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A famous photo was taken in December 1944 on the deck of the battleship USS New Jersey in the South Pacific, showing a Japanese prisoner of war being bathed before being given clothes, but in front of the public eye. It is clear what his intentions are when he exposes himself completely naked.

Sigh. For those who have never been in a military organization, the sailors on those ships all bathed in open showers in boot camp and they all dressed, shaved and bathed in front of each other in their berthing spaces where racks (beds for you landlubbers) are stacked three high and the space between them is maybe as wide as your shoulders. Warships are crowded. Mess decks were the crew eats are likewise crowded. Cleanliness on board a ship where everyone lives cheek by jowl is vital. If one sailor gets the galloping crud pretty soon every sailor on board has it and your ship cannot fight when your crew is sick.

I will also mention we had something we called a "red belly". If a sailor had poor hygiene it was not unheard of for other sailors to hold him down in the shower and scrub him down with stiff bristle brushes and disinfectant. The Chief and Division Officer would be temporarily deaf to the sailors screams of pain and be blind to the resulting abrasions. I have seen one myself at the Coast Guard Academy. Nobody wants to sleep or eat half a meter from someone that smells and/or has lice or scabies (crotch lobsters we called them). A little sanitation of the prisoners is a good thing and certainly not a war crime. You guys are really stretching things.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Franklin Roosevelt let it happen,

No. The Japanese took extraordinary operations security precautions planning and executing the attack on Pearl Harbor. For one thing the US had not yet decoded the IJNs operational encryption. The US had compromised their diplomatic code but not their military code. That would not happen until May of 1942.

The Japanese planners relied on person to person meetings and hand delivered messages. They eschewed any form of electronic communications during the planning phase of the operation. Rather than use one of the IJNs normal fleet anchorages the task force was assembled in an isolated bay on the Inland Sea that was not subject to US surveillance (the US was at this point paying very close attention to the whereabouts of major Japanese combat ships and had an electronics surveillance ship sailing nearby as well). It was actually driving the US Navy nuts that they had lost track of four of Japan's aircraft carriers.

Once at sea the Japanese proceeded "zip lip", no use of radio whatsoever. They used signal flags and flashing lights to communicate within the fleet. To complicate matter for US intelligence there was another major Japanese task force heading south towards the Philippines that had US war planners convinced this was to be Japan's initial strike.

And if you look at US preparations in Hawaii, the US was not expecting Japan to attack US territory, thinking that would be too great an outrage even for the Japanese. They were convinced the first strike would be someplace like the Philippines or maybe Guam, both former Spanish possessions gained during the Spanish American War. Rather that put aircraft in revetments to protect them from bombing, aircraft were parked closely together, cordoned off and heavily guarded against sabotage. The US was expecting the Japanese to attempt sabotage in Hawaii and attack somewhere else.

Nobody the the top commanders in Japan and the IJN new what was coming. Certainly nobody in the US thought Japan would dare attack Hawaii. A tragic mistake on the US part.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

When they returned to port late that day, the U.S. carriers must have been surprised to find what had happened. On the other hand, the IJ strike force thought their mission was half done because they missed these carriers to be sunk. The Midway Sea Battle was thus planned to complete the original plan. But the U.S. side knew every bit of the IJ Navy's movement with its advanced technology of communication.

Strangely enough, the Japanese people had known nothing about the Midway disaster until after World War II ended. The media and all were in a complete control of the military at the time.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@TaiwanIsNotChinaDesert TortoiseT

Please try searching for what kind of photo it is.

You don't have to be a member of the military to understand this, but if it's normal to have only one person take a bath on the deck of a ship, then the US military is doing something very strange. And it was in front of hundreds of American soldiers.

Or is it a tradition for all American troops to bathe fully nude on "deck"? Unfortunately, the American military is full of perverts.

https://twitter.com/kohyu1952/status/323325294826119168

They say it's called the Bataan Death March, but the inside story is quite sketchy. How many days can you walk 80km?

A military man would probably walk this distance in a few days, but would tens of thousands of people die doing so? The same goes for the Japanese military, who died of illness due to lack of medicine.

MacArthur irresponsibly ran away first.

For example, the only real death march that could be called a death march would be the one in which 15,000 Cherokee Indians were forced to walk 2,000 kilometers from Georgia to Oklahoma.

Over 8,000 people died during the harsh six-month journey that spanned winter. In the United States, this is called the "Trail of Tears."

0 ( +0 / -0 )

TaiwanIsNotChinaToday  05:30 pm JST

Agent_NeoToday 03:50 pm JST

Americans will probably be angry at me, but if I point out, attacking Pearl Harbor by surprise does not violate international law.

Well it wasn't exactly honorable having your diplomats discussing peace the day of a sneak attack. The war crime comes because it was part of an expansionist agenda.

Pearl Harbor may or may not have been a surprise attack by design. Japan had sent an official Declaration of War to the Japanese Embassy in Washington DC to be handed to US Secretary of State Cordell Hull. But with a delay resulting from de-coding the message, the Declaration ended up being handed to Cordell Hull over 7 hours after the actual attack had started. Hawaii being 6 hours ahead of Washington DC.

Regardless, the US most certainly used the term "sneak attack" to raise national ire against Japan and direct US public sentiment towards US entry into WWII. Only a day after declaring war on Japan, the US declared war on Germany and Italy as well.

Today this is merely historical fodder, as Japanese warships call at Pearl Harbor and carry out joint exercises with the United States. And US forces exercise wit German and Italian forces under NATO.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

When the IJ task forces arrived in Hawaii, off Oahu, and started attacking Pearl Harbor, on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, to their surprise, they found no aircraft carriers there that had usually been anchored there on Sundays. Why were the carriers not there on that particular Sunday?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@OssanAmerica

What I want to say is that the attack on Pearl Harbor was definitely a surprise attack by Japan.

I know that some Americans blame Japan for a snake attack, so there were no international rules at the time that required Japan to attack the United States after officially declaring war.

There are no rules for starting a war, whether you declare war before or after the attack.

@TaiwanIsNotChina

The war crime comes because it was part of an expansionist agenda.

The United States provided military aid to China, which Japan had been fighting against even before the war, imposed an oil embargo on Japan, and imposed a Hull Note on Japan.

Isn't it correct that the American government was desperate to go to war with Japan at Churchill's request?

America's war crimes included the mistreatment of Japanese prisoners of war, the massive air raid on Tokyo, the strafing of civilians, and the use of the atomic bomb, a weapon of mass destruction, all in violation of the Geneva Conventions.

You can't talk about history if you ignore that.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I have heard that the Japanese military's information was not kept confidential, to the extent that the code had already been broken, and even among general Japanese soldiers it was said that Midway was next.

If we were to lose four aircraft carriers on top of that, it would be a major defeat considering the construction time.

As mentioned above, I think the wasteful consumption of military power at Guadalcanal and Midway can be considered a turning point.

Americans will probably be angry at me, but if I point out, attacking Pearl Harbor by surprise does not violate international law.

Because wars don't start by throwing gloves at each other like in the Middle Ages.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

According to Wikipedia:

The Battle of Midway, along with the Guadalcanal campaign, is widely considered a turning point in the Pacific War.

Though, how much can we trust historians spending their lives reading about the achievements of better men?

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Wow, some of the comments here. Sure there was some luck involved, on all sides.

The Japanese Admiral in command screwed up royally, because of UNlucky information, and the US pilots had some luck too in finding the Japanese fleet.

BUT Japan was never a major threat after Midway, as they lost too many of their top of the line pilots, and 4 fleet carriers.

Anyone who says it was a "major" defeat is blowing smoke up somewhere.

Yeah the US got lucky in some aspects, but the bravery of the pilots won the day.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

rainyday,

It's said that cryptographers or telephone operators called Washington frantically to tell that the IJ task forces were approaching Hawaii but that their calls were simply dismissed. A film footage shows a content Roosevelt in all smiles after announcing to the nation on the radio that the U.S. would declare war against Japan.

What does it all mean?

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

If U.S forces had deciphered the IJ Navy's code during the June 1942 Battle of Midway, they could have already deciphered it and known that the IJ task forces were approaching Hawaii to attack Pearl Harbor. Franklin Roosevelt let it happen, though, for he had wanted the U.S. to enter the Pacific war very earnestly and help Churchill's Great Britain. He might have drawn a bigger picture than that.

-13 ( +2 / -15 )

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