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Japan's de facto ban on liquid baby formula may be lifted in summer

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While liquid formula is widely used abroad for its convenience, the production and sales of such a product is not allowed in Japan due to the absence of government safety standards.

ie. Japanese companies have not cornered the market for this product yet, allowing a monopoly on the domestic production before foreign companies can be shut out

6 ( +9 / -3 )

What the heck is a ‘de facto ban’?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

the production and sales of such a product is not allowed in Japan due to the absence of government safety standards

In Japan, everything is banned until the government tells you it isn’t.

Way to be on the front of the innovation curve...

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Good for Finland.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

DisillusionedToday 07:52 am JST    What the heck is a ‘de facto ban’?

That's a Ban you're having when you're not having a Ban  (bureaucrat-speak)

Like that other clueless expression we often hear "in principle", which means "is not".

eg "In principle smoking is banned here" - which means it isn't.

And as has been noted, the only reason liquid formula is not sold here is because, in the first instance all would be imported, meaning local powdered-formula companies would lose out. The instant formula would surely be a big hit, so local industries must be protected. And that's not in principle.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

It is right there in the second paragraph. There are no safety standards that have been agreed on, so there is nothing to stop dodgy companies selling tainted milk. While we all like to think it is stopping us from getting the healthy and safe Finnish/European/American liquid formula, the reality of it is, the instant this ban is lifted (without safety standards in place) you will have a bunch of infant formula imported from China, and other Asian countries.

I am all for this news, even if it isnt in time for our little one. Set government standards, make sure imported milk is tested and safe, and let us have more options...

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Dango bongToday 07:20 am JST

ie. Japanese companies have not cornered the market for this product yet, allowing a monopoly on the domestic production before foreign companies can be shut out

That is BS, foreign holding firms control vast amounts of the grocery market in Japan, especially processed food in general but especially processed dairy ("cheese"), condiments, soft drinks and all kinds of detergents and soaps for house cleaning and personal care.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Why the govt. to ban? If it is for mothers (parents) needing, should find ways to collect opinions from them to decide this 'de facto ban' to be lifted in summer. Isn't it?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Magnus wrong way round, The Japanese Agriculture Association has a stranglehold on production, logistics and point of sale. They, due to their power the rural vote counts *3. A farmer trying to grow crops not using their seeds their supply system mysteriously their crops are sprayed with herbicide. Obviously as they can't even regularly supply butter, they have agreed to allow a product that the rest of the world has been using for decades. Wonder why every supermarket has exactly the same bland goods it's because of the JAA. Who's board of directors are Nippon Kaigi so don't expect a decent choice of cheese, meats, sauces. They have just bowed to pressure on this one.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

But there are already wonderful products overseas. IMPORT THEM

3 ( +3 / -0 )

For a country that has a farming community average age is 67, and a food production well less than 50%, the day will come when the JAA realises it's redundant. And the only option is to import food. Rice is grown in California, Australia but as it's packaged in Japan it's Japanese. Also costs an exorbitant amount. It took 7 years to realise that this baby formula might actually have a benefit. We are now about to land in Japan passengers are reminded to set your watches back 20 years.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@afan. Don’t china bash. Chinese baby formula mostly comes from NZ.

the problem with these liquid formulas is they come with the added spice...chemicals.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

the instant this ban is lifted (without safety standards in place) you will have a bunch of infant formula imported from China, and other Asian countries.

Yeah but who is going to buy it?

You think parents are so uncaring?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I read in another newspaper the other day that a young woman had made a fortune selling her breast milk. I wonder if that is legal in Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yeah but who is going to buy it?

You think parents are so uncaring?

I think that there is a large number of parents who are under financial strain. Sure the typical late late 20s to 30s parents with only one child who live in Tokyo with good salaries wouldnt touch it. They only buy overpriced Combi/Pigeon branded baby goods anyway.

But people who dont have a lot of disposable income, multiple kids etc, when faced with a decision between brand name milk and another milk that costs half as much, may decide "its probably exactly the same"; and perhaps it will be. Or perhaps it has unknown chemicals in it. Without standards and testing, you would never know.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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