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Japan's Pacific bluefin tuna fishing quota to remain unchanged

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As stated above, all species of pacific tuna are endangered. Many marine ecologists believe that, even if commercial fishing was stopped today, many species tuna would never recover due to the genetic diversity of these species being so devistated. Most species are genetically smaller due to fishers targeting the bigger healthier fish leaving only the smaller fish to repopulate. It should come as no surprise Japan will not change their quota or agree to any kind of compromise. There has been a strict internationally agreed quota for tunas over the past 40 odd years. Japan has frequently exceeded these quotas over these years, which has resulted in the demise of the healthy populations. Now, they intend to continue raping populations of tunas only to support the thousands of fishermen whose life depends on it, but it is their previous greedy actions that have caused this problem. The Japan sea is a perfect example of Japan's ocean conservation mentality. The pacific sardine (iwashi) is extinct in the japan sea due to overfishing and other species like bonito (katsuo, horse mackerel (aji) and yellow tail king fish (buri) are endangered and extremely rare. However, the Japan Sea has been invaded by giant jellyfish. The fishermen have constantly complained about the presence of these jellyfish, but do nothing about it. The reason these jelkyfish are so prominent is not because they have moved in. It is because the fishermen have removed all the predatory fish that eat the fry of these jellyfish causing a population explosion. “Oh der!” Their answer is to just keep fishing for these species and consider the jellyfish an inconvenience. “Only after Japan has eaten the last fish will they realize the cannot eat money!”

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Tadow - you're correct - the boom in sushi popularity around the world has certainly impacted tuna consumption.

But currently Japan still consumes at least 75% of the world bluefin catch, which in itself is a mind boggling stat. esp considering the population.

Unless people become truly aware of the dire situation and forgo a relatively "new custom" for the majority - that of eating raw tuna - then little will change.

Where there's demand business will find a supplier. And in the case of bluefin a highly likely end to the chain.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The unfortunate side-effect of sashimi becoming popular around the world. Soon, it will become too expensive for the average Japanese person to afford.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Japanese understand overfishing about as much as they understand plastic comes from fossil fuels

2 ( +3 / -1 )

"We wanted to alleviate the hardship of people in the fishing industry, so it was very regrettable,"

that in itself is the mentality of Japans conservation, they seem to think people welfare is a trump card for conservation. heres a little hint, Hardship will be absolute for the tuna industry if theres no tuna left to catch, F morons

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Japan's Pacific bluefin tuna fishing quota to remain unchanged.... until there are no more. All of the pacific tuna species are listed as endangered, which means absolutely nothing to the Japanese.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Until extinct.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

"We wanted to alleviate the hardship of people in the fishing industry, so it was very regrettable," said Shingo Ota of the Fisheries Agency, who headed the Japanese delegation to the talks.

Ah, a that is the problem with the fishing agency here, so short-sighted and selfish. What about the fisherman of the future? Sustainable fishery practices will ensure supplies and jobs of the future generations. Any presentation requesting an increase in quotas needs to show how stocks have recovered. If the delegation were serious about the world fishery, the commission would promote MSC certified fisheries, not their own agenda. 

https://www.msc.org/standards-and-certification/fisheries-standard/

9 ( +10 / -1 )

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