Japan Today
national

Japan's food waste in FY2022 caused ¥4 tril in economic losses

21 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2024 GPlusMedia Inc.

21 Comments
Login to comment

Education, education, education..... Kind of hard to educate the future generations about this issue, when the one's who should be setting the example are wasting the most food.

Laws were created to "protect" the public from "outdated" food and processed food, so it's kind of hypocritical to complain about a self created problem.

Better yet, create laws that allow people who want to purchase outdated or "recently" expired food, and have them sign waivers.

Hell I know a few conbini owners who can not give food away to the homeless because of the liability laws. The homeless would gladly take the food,

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Some products (a lot of them), eg: milk, yogurt, processed cheese, salt, can food, etc, all can be very safely consumed after their expiration date pass. The food just don't expire instantly if the date is due.

The simplest possible solution to this would be to offer a 75% or more discount to those products, instead of just throwing them.

I know a lot of people happily purchasing those without any issues.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20240613-japan-has-an-excess-sushi-problem-these-food-waste-activists-put-it-in-numbers

Is it like the Johnny's case,where,unless it was uncovered by proper journalists,and risks international condemnation,it goes unreported?

I work in a small, family -run restaurant here,and staff,owners have not a clue about what can be put in slops for local pig farmers or put in normal burnable garbage.

Despite me taking the lead,I'm a stupid gaijin,so noone is going to follow my example.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I work in a small, family -run restaurant here,and staff,owners have not a clue about what can be put in slops for local pig farmers or put in normal burnable garbage.

All non-meat food waste can be put in the pig slops. Fewer restaurants these days have them collected. Also the collection of used oil.

My Japanese partner would try to ditch any product after the date. But I showed it wasn't necessary and it was still good to eat. Meats we keep in the freezer.

We have a very low level of food waste. Mostly vegetable peels. Leftover food is kept for the next day.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

And I bet a good percentage of that waste is from school lunches.

The amount of milk I see being poured down the drain every day just because it’s the due date….

5 ( +6 / -1 )

The simplest possible solution to this would be to offer a 75% or more discount to those products, instead of just throwing them.

And it would be nice if supermarkets didn't wait until the fruit is moldy before they slap on that 30% off sticker.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

I work in a small, family -run restaurant here,and staff,owners have not a clue about what can be put in slops for local pig farmers or put in normal burnable garbage.

There are a host of reasons why this is impossible today. This is not possible.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Our local food stores reduce the prices daily by 30-50% and still good.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

"Slop for pigs"? How does this work? Never heard of it before now.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

There was a time when a restaurant put food waste in a bin and a farmer would collect it to feed his pigs. But I don't see it anymore.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

I have worked in this restaurant for over two years,

I personally take the slop bins to the pig farms every few days.

I

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I try to pop all leftovers into pig bucket,including meat.

Pigs are omnivores,in case you noticed.

Meanwhile,in supermarkets and convenience stores,it's a totally different story,as you may have figured out if you actually read the highly informative article linked above.

Cheers from the real world.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

a pet peeve of mine is people throwing away cooked rice at the end of the day, because they want freshly cooked rice. wrap it and throw it in the fridge, zap it in the microwave and rice is fine to eat for days after being cooked.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

This can't be fixed. Most restaurants don't allow taking out leftovers in fear of the government inspecting them when some consumer-caused food poisoning happens.

The lazy government is the problem.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

My Japanese partner would try to ditch any product after the date. But I showed it wasn't necessary and it was still good to eat.

What television drama is that idea from?

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

How was it a loss to economy? Didn’t someone pay for the food even if not eaten? I think it’s miscalculated. It’s not a loss, it’s paid. Even the person eats the extra food, it doesn’t save money but it makes the person fat (depending on the type of food, like rice).

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

How was it a loss to economy? Didn’t someone pay for the food even if not eaten? 

True.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

All these foods are taxed, how is it waste?

So..are they going to go through my garbage too now like the old nothing better to do folks at the appartments..??

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

zibala

My Japanese partner would try to ditch any product after the date. But I showed it wasn't necessary and it was still good to eat.

What television drama is that idea from?

How could I? In your recent several posts, you said I didn't have a TV. ROFL

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I rarely check the expiry date on any food I buy......not even fresh food. I do look at fruits tho, just to see if the skins are going off or have blotches on them. I love bananas and eat about 12 a week, even the ones with blacks marks on the skin are ok, because the banana is OK beneath it. I recently ate some creamed potato salad and cheese flavoured salad from tubs which had been in my fridge for about 6 days, I just checked the top layer for any mouldy stuff but did not see any, so I ate it over a period of 3days. I have had side effects, and am writing this, so it must have been OK.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites