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Japan adds four new industries to skilled foreign worker visa

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Number 2 visa means that you are smart and smart means that you can work somewhere better than Japan.

-11 ( +16 / -27 )

make preparations to accept (the foreign workers) without delay and to make efforts to realize an inclusive society."

Japan plans to admit up to 820,000 foreigners under its skilled worker visa in the next five fiscal years from April, more than double the number it had estimated

Doubling the number of cheap workers from abroad that's how J Govt handle Japan Inc that struggle with labor shortage.

.

In the railway sector, skilled workers can be accepted for roles involved in the manufacturing of train cars and maintenance of tracks. 

Maintenance of tracks, what time they start to work? After last train is stopped running, that between midnight and dawn. Who will handle that? Foreign cheap labor.

.

As of the end of December 2023, there were around 208,000 workers in the country on the No. 1 visa and 37 with the No. 2 visa, according to the Immigration Services Agency of Japan.

No.2 Visa that can lead to long term resident in Japan unlike No.1 Visa, so far how many are they? 37 thousands? No, only 37 people.

-14 ( +8 / -22 )

The Japanese government on Friday added four new industries to its foreign skilled worker visa program as it moves to address the nation's driver shortage

There actually is no "shortage" of truck, taxi and train drivers in Japan - and no need to import them from overseas.

If private transport companies started paying a decent salary for these jobs, those Japanese waiting on the sidelines of the workforce would fill these positions overnight.

9 ( +20 / -11 )

In the meantime Japanese Immigration will turn a blind eye to the fake references getting approved flooding Japan with inexperienced workers lowering the quality of a once valued "Made in Japan" products and services. Proof of fake "experienced" workers coming thru Immigration can be found at the racehorse breeding farms around Shiga, Ibaraki and Hokkaido. These workers submitted references to Immigration stating 10 years of horse riding experience yet they have never ridden a horse before, hence the working at farms where there is no horse riding. Please feel free to visit these farms and see for yourself before commenting on no factual statistics.

-14 ( +9 / -23 )

Maintenance of tracks, what time they start to work? After last train is stopped running, that between midnight and dawn. Who will handle that? Foreign cheap labor.

And who do you think IS and has been doing it for the past what, 70 years or so? Right, "cheap" Japanese labor!

If they are qualified they will get paid the same.

8 ( +15 / -7 )

Skilled foreign workers are not coming to Japan. They’re heading for the U.S., Australia and other developed countries where they can find much better-paying jobs.

-7 ( +15 / -22 )

Problems linked to the trainee program have resulted in some participants abandoning their employment due to abuses such as unpaid wages and harassment.

Things which are endemic to the Japanese "free labor market" for which you can see all the associated socioeconomic stressors, the over-proliferation of 転職 job agencies etc.

Japanese labor has been gutted, foreigners have no hope.

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

Who would come to Japan for low wages when salaries are double in Europe and the US, three times in the US and Australia.

Not only that but the chances for citizenship, advancement and societies where human rights are respected and recourse to impartial legal proceedings are givens.

And the sinking yen is hardly going to entice those with even a basic understanding of economics…

-10 ( +13 / -23 )

The 2024 problem?

With no sensible immigration policy these issues have been bubbling away since the 90s.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

"Skilled foreign workers are not coming to Japan. They’re heading for the U.S., Australia and other developed countries where they can find much better-paying jobs"

Exactly, the only ones coming to Japan are the low level workers that don't meet the skill set required to get jobs in other countries. As inflation grew in other countries, so do the wages to counter inflation and the cost of living. Japan's wages are still at the same level as they were 30 years ago in some industries. What was 250,000en/month 30 years ago is now $3500-4000/month in other countries so who would come to Japan to lose money? Only the bottom of the barrel level wants to come to Japan which isn't going to help the country.

-11 ( +10 / -21 )

Japan should follow US President Biden's lead to find new workers - let illegal foreigners run through the customs gate in Narita, Haneda, and Itami

-15 ( +5 / -20 )

Who would come to Japan for low wages when salaries are double in Europe and the US, three times in the US and Australia.

SE Asians (especially Filipinos, Thai and Vietnamese) idolize Japan, so theres one group. Many of them would be happy to sacrifice huge extra $$$ they could earn in Australia, Canada, Europe etc for a chance of enjoying the discipline, safety and work ethic of Japan for 5 years working as a train or truck driver etc.

5 ( +12 / -7 )

@Yubaru

And who do you think IS and has been doing it for the past what, 70 years or so? Right, "cheap" Japanese labor!

If they are qualified they will get paid the same.

Many jobs that being done by people who hold Specified Skilled Worker visa or Trainee visa will be paid less, compared if same job being done by Japanese. If that being done by Japanese especially during nighttime, the cost will be skyrocketed.

Those Visa category exist for some reason, although in Japan already have regular work visa. Those visa has particular constraint, they only be in Japan for limited time and they have certain condition before they can really switch job.

So company can pay them with less than market but those foreigners just don't have bargaining power. Without job they'll lost their visa.

.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Japan-immigration/Foreign-workers-in-Japan-earn-only-70-of-average-pay

https://sp.m.jiji.com/english/show/4002

-8 ( +4 / -12 )

Then if they need so many why aren’t salaries increasing drastically to recruit people rather than 3rd world county citizens? In addition more focus is often placed on language skills than actual job skills. A way to have near slave wages for a 1st world country by making you think you’re doing wonderful things. Sad to see expansion of abuse of 3rd world countries. Friend from China told me. Japan only gets the Chinese who can’t cut it in China. China’s market and salaries are better than Japans and future growth. Couldn’t argue with the statement.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

The extremely low crime rate and quality food and beautiful ladies are undoubtedly something to consider.

Japan is changing slowly but surely.

A very interesting country to live in

1 ( +7 / -6 )

As drivers of buses and taxis often communicate with passengers, they are required to pass the N3 level of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test, the third highest in the exam's five levels and a condition stricter than required to work in other sectors.

This is laughable. I know people, myself included, who have N1 yet cannot hold a conversation with a non-sympathetic Japanese speaker unused to conversing with a non-Japanese. N3?!

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

SE Asians (especially Filipinos, Thai and Vietnamese) idolize Japan

?

As confusing as your statement that Taro Aso is the envy of western democracies. Your cheerleading can get very silly at times.

Many of them would be happy to sacrifice huge extra $$ they could earn in Australia, Canada, Europe etc for a chance of enjoying the discipline, safety and work ethic of Japan for 5 years working as a train or truck driver etc.

I’d say Australia and Canada would be much more attractive. Higher pay and English-speaking.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

@David Brent

The best conversations that I have ever had are the ones with non native Japanese speakers in…Japanese

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

@Fighto

Who exactly are the idols that the SE Asians look up to?

Pikachu and Sazae san?

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

I’d say Australia and Canada would be much more attractive. Higher pay and English-speaking.

They are attractive no doubt, but every nation has a cap on immigrants of all visa types. Also, why focus on English? Many other Asians study (and some speak) Japanese.

Many are attracted to working and living in Japan, as bizarre as some seem to imagine.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

And STILL they won’t those of us that lived here for years, but never managed to stay married long enough to get permanent residency, GET Residency or even some type of work visa.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

wallaceToday  02:05 pm JST

Japan: Fukushima clean-up workers, including homeless, at grave risk of exploitation, say UN experts

https://www.ohchr.org/en/press-releases/2018/08/japan-fukushima-clean-workers-including-homeless-grave-risk-exploitation-say

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

This is all inevitable with the labor crunch and more and more sectors will have to be opened .

As drivers of buses and taxis often communicate with passengers, they are required to pass the N3 level of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test, the third highest in the exam's five levels

Thats a pretty big hoop to jump through to drive a taxi or a bus though! Not sure if the incentive is there for this one. Back to the drawing board transport industry. I wouldn’t expect a big inflow on this one.

Allow Uber in to fill the gap for the next decade or so, when it will all be automated anyway?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

WA4TKG

And STILL they won’t those of us that lived here for years, but never managed to stay married long enough to get permanent residency, GET Residency or even some type of work visa.

You have lived here for many years. Married but divorced before you had PR. No work visa.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Are they not going to consider those foreigners who are already in Japan but with temporary visa?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Many are attracted to working and living in Japan, as bizarre as some seem to imagine

I’m just looking at the maths and and practicalities more than anything. If I was coming from a developing country looking to work abroad for a few years for a few bob - I’d choose Australia or Canada over Japan.

Better pay and if your English is poor, a good chance to learn it. Proficiency in English would open more doors than proficiency in Japanese ( I’m speaking as someone who did bother to reach a high level of Japanese ).

I’m not saying avoid Japan. Just saying it wouldn’t be my first choice in this situation.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Jimizo

I’m just looking at the maths and and practicalities more than anything. If I was coming from a developing country looking to work abroad for a few years for a few bob - I’d choose Australia or Canada over Japan.

Are those countries allowing temporary foreign workers?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The No. 2 visa allows for unlimited renewals, opening the door to....... a whole load of problems in the future.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

The No. 2 visa allows for unlimited renewals

Virtually all visas in Japan do as long as one meets the requirements.

opening the door to....... a whole load of problems in the future.

For example? Skilled workers staying in Japan? The humanity!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Immigrant labor puts a downward pressure on wages. Period.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Immigrant labor puts a downward pressure on wages. Period.

Does it? Question Mark.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I just hope Japan study Europe, US, Australia, Canada, and Singapore on how to handle influx of low level but hungry immigrants. Lots of things to consider or you end up with Tokyo as Paris or Toronto is now. Nobody should want that.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Immigrant labor puts a downward pressure on wages. Period.

Does it? Question Mark.

Yes. Imagine you are a carpenter, there are just enough carpenters to do the work. Now you have more carpenters competing for the same work. The new carpenters are from a much poorer country and are willing to work for less. You think wages will go up?

Or in Japan's case there are not enough carpenters, bosses need to compete and offer higher wages to get workers. The imported workers kill this need.

Immigrant labor is not good for the working class.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

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