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Japanese beef brand faces marketing mess as kanji creates confusion

16 Comments

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16 Comments
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Why not include kanji in the article? The kanji for Hitachi city is 日立(市). Doing a Google search it looks like Hitachi Domain used these kanji 常陸(府中藩) so it's understandable that there is confusion when consumers see 常陸牛 in the grocery store.

23 ( +23 / -0 )

Should have shown the kanji. Thanks ZZR.

16 ( +16 / -0 )

Hitachi city (日立市) is located in Ibaraki while this Hitachiwagyu (常陸牛) is spread across Ibaraki

https://ibaraki.lin.gr.jp/hitachiwagyu.jp/manufacturer_info/

.

Older respondents fared better, with 33 percent of those in their 40s, 35 percent of people in their 50s and just 22 percent of individuals in their 60s offering the wrong answer.

Not only these people mistakenly the kanji, other people might confused whether that wagyu is originated from Hitachi City. While in fact is type of wagyu that being breed and produce across Ibaraki.

That's smart way of marketing, just blame to customer.

-9 ( +6 / -15 )

After living in Ibaraki for 23 years, I can wholeheartedly attest to the tastiness of Hitachigyu. I can also attest to the local government hitting many snags when it comes to promoting the prefecture. In a word, it is ‘non-existent.’

And long may that continue. Long may Ibaraki be ranked 47th in Japan. Don’t want the hordes of tourists, foreign or domestic, traipsing around the place. It’s peaceful here.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

. I can also attest to the local government hitting many snags when it comes to promoting the prefecture. In a word, it is ‘non-existent.’

It might non-existent, however it already spent some amount tax payer money for no actual result, as you already mentioned "non-existent"

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

it already spent some amount tax payer money for no actual result

Same as it ever was.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

it already spent some amount tax payer money for no actual result

This is basically the modus operandi of governments worldwide. Ibaraki pref. has simply refined it to an art form.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

The names of the old provinces can be a bit confusing. Gunma Prefecture, formerly Kozuke, is written with the same characters as Ueno Park (上野).

1 ( +1 / -0 )

why not include kanji in the article? 

yes, i thought the article was referring to 日立, and even i can read that... but 常陸?

no chance!!

7 ( +7 / -0 )

i guess 茨城牛 is too unsophisticated and easy.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Part of it is how much the old names are used today, I reckon. Nagano still uses the old name 信州 quite a bit for example.

The names of the old provinces can be a bit confusing. Gunma Prefecture,

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Include the kanji in the article!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

If they offer me one million yen as a consultancy fee, I'll tell them to add furigana.

That'll be cheaper than the consultancy fee some marketing gurus would charge.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

All of which confusion highlights how kanji is simply not a good fit for the Japanese language. Adopting a writing system created for a very different language might have been the only solution over a thousand years ago but if it needs the addition of furigana for people to be able to read and understand it then there is a fundamental failure of the purpose of a writing system.

The city of Hitachinaka has even done away with kanji altogether and just presents its name in phonetic hiragana characters

Perhaps that is the solution?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Indeed, that is the perfect solution (but will be resisted mightily by all those with a vested interest, such as junior high school Kokugo Japanese language teachers, etc.)

By the way, Minami-Alps City in Yamanashi Prefecture promotes itself as 'The only city with a Katakana name'...!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Oh well there beef in naming beef. Regardless of character and taste if people are hungry they want to buy beef will buy it and eat it had the misnaming had not been disclosed perhaps it would have not made a difference.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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