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Day care uses sensors to prevent sudden infant death in sleep

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This is a good example of medicalization. I'm sorry to tell you but you can't control everything and simply have to deal with some level of uncertainty in life. Sensor likely gives too many false alarm to be useful. Also I doubt that there is scientific basis on constantly checking on baby's position altough sleeping on stomach does have higher risk for sudden infant death syndrome. It's sad that because of legal reasons this kind of practises are introduced.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

There should be a legally defined carer to child ratio. If there aren't enough staff they should not be allowed to care for too many children. I've said many times that I find Japan's faith in technology to cure all social and economics problems as very naive. In this case they are using their children as part of the experiement. NEVER rely on technology alone, always have sufficient personnel there for back up, it's a tool not a panacea.

When I was a nurse we were always told never to rely on the eqiupment alone. Batteries run down, machines fail, electricity gets cut off. Always check the imprortant things yourself.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Great idea to solve a problem...but. I’m on my second robot cleaner in my house. Japanese electrical items all seem to break down in a year or so, so to trust the lives of children to sensors is not a good idea.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I bought something like this when my daughter was a baby... It was very sensitive and went off a few times when my daughter was sleeping deeply. It cost about 200$ (I had to ship it from the US, wouldn't trust a Japanese one tbh) and honestly I can't promise it actually saved her from anything. But I will say that I had postpartum depression and couldn't sleep a wink for the first 6 weeks after she was born because I was too afraid she was going to stop breathing or be hurt. Irrational or not this thing actually gave me a bit of sleep between feedings. Japan actually has a very low rate of SIDS so it's probably mostly just an irrational fear but if it helps put a parent or caregiver at ease even a tiny bit it's probably worth it IMO.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Stop giving the kids multiple dose cocktail immunizations

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

It is frightening that while the staff receive "relief" that is "psychological[...]", yet all the while, infants, who all need "skinship" (naked touching [non-erotic]) or at least touching to maintain their body temperature [or, at least (at an older age), their sense of trust in the environing personnel], are left to visual checks or, worse, remote metal sensors' attention that they cannot sense. The resulting psychological damage may be profound and, one fears, incurable. What a loneliness--full of the fear of death (because for infants, who cannot even feed themselves, isolation means death)! IF THERE IS ANY FACTICITY in the theory that SIMS is due to psychological factors mounting up, this is far worse than hiring unlicensed persons merely to cuddle the little "things".

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Google "New Zealand SIDS mattress".

They might be on to something there.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

While I applaud their efforts to protect the tiny tots, it breaks my heart that parents have to leave a baby with strangers to go to work to make ends meet. Thank you Abenomics.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@Aly

1) This has nothing to do with Abenomics.

2) Many people go to work even if they can make ends meet.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This has nothing to do with Abenomics.

Many people go to work even if they can make ends meet.

Most people who work and have a newborn do so out of necessity not choice.

Some may do it out of choice, but most don't

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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