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Japan getting more Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines to immunize elderly faster

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from May 10

Wasn't the previous start date sometime in April?

12 ( +14 / -2 )

In most other wealthy nations, we see it is a furious race of vaccines against variants. Sure, Japan has not seen the same number of deaths so far, so the authorities might think they have time for a slow roll out of vaccinations. But the surge of cases in Osaka and other areas indicates this could easily get out of hand, and with too few critical care units for the size of the population, another wave and stronger restrictions is not unlikely. So why not a greater sense of urgency?

11 ( +15 / -4 )

Wasn't the previous start date sometime in April?

April 12 I believe is still is the date for starting the 65+ group. Yet there are still over 3 million healthcare workers yet to receive their first shots. Unclear where the pre-existing risk people fit into the schedule as well.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

This is possible thanks to the European Medicines Agency EMA, which approved the production of BioNTech vaccine at the Marburg/Germany facility after BioNTech set it up in record time. One billion additional doses a year is possible from this plant alone:

https://investors.biontech.de/news-releases/news-release-details/biontech-provides-update-vaccine-production-status-marburg/

Also thanks to the EU for not restricting the export of BioNTech/Pfizer's vaccine (like e.g. US), although they also are in urgent need of it.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

That's very good news. Let's hope this is not false hope with deliveries delayed for whatever reason and they actually can and do get them into the arms of the elderly and vulnerable ASAP. May 10 - May 24, 18 million shots - Japanese should keep the politicians (LDP) to their word.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

It is good that delivery is going to accelerate, but this is still extremely slow even by developing world standards, the pathological obsession that Japan has with doing things slowly to try and avoid any kind of minuscule problem is costing lives everyday.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

April 12 I believe is still is the date for starting the 65+ group.

Is it?

from May 10 to give a first shot to half of Japan's 36 million elderly people

So 65+ and "elderly" are a distinct set of people?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

If the general population can't be fully vaccinated by the start of the Olympics, then it's just another massive fail. Is the world to suspect that Japans cutting edge is incapable of producing a national vaccine? No? Then where the hell is it?

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Good news...now let's see what new excuses the govt and it's stooges will come up with to justify the snail pace of rollout here since won't be able to blame " gaikoku," for the delays anymore.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Also thanks to the EU for not restricting the export of BioNTech/Pfizer's vaccine (like e.g. US), although they also are in urgent need of it.

I would not be celebrating the EU so quickly, they are still stopping the export of vaccines to other countries, just ask Australia! This smacks of nationalism and I really wonder if some countries have the right to sue over breach of contract. Many countries ordered and pre-paid for the vaccines, only to be left in the lurch as politicians demanded they not be exported to other countries.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Japan getting more Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines to immunize elderly faster

The problem is not getting the vaccine but injecting the one we have into people's arms.

At the average of 25,000 shots/day it will take seven years to vaccinate just half the population.

How about vaccinating people also on weekends? the virus doesn't take a break so should we.

https://www.mhlw.go.jp/stf/seisakunitsuite/bunya/vaccine_sesshujisseki.html

4 ( +6 / -2 )

And what about the rest of us? I have two autoimmune disorders as well as asthma. I would like to go out without being on the edge of a panic attack every day.

Most of my friends back in the States have already gotten the vaccine.

I would really like to go back to my home country and see my elderly grandfather. He doesn't have much time left (cancer). Are we even going to get the vaccine for regular (non-elderly) citizens this year? What about us permanent residence? I wonder if foreigners will ever even be in consideration to get the vaccine.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Excellent. The Pfizer vaccine is proving effective against other strains too:

Real-world data shows vaccines kicking butt—including against scary variant

“Very, very good reason for everyone to get vaccinated,” Fauci says.

Ref: https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/04/real-world-data-shows-vaccines-kicking-butt-including-against-scary-variant/

Plus, the Pfizer vaccine is showing to be even more effective for 12-15 yr olds in trials.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

And what about the rest of us? I have two autoimmune disorders as well as asthma. I would like to go out without being on the edge of a panic attack every day.

Most of my friends back in the States have already gotten the vaccine.

I think in your case, I would just to back and get a vaccine. You would look ridiculous, but you could wear a hazmat helmet on the plane. The chance of getting infected that way is approaching zero that way.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

More vaccines will not speed up the process as the rate of vaccination needs to be increased . Supply of syringes and how refrigeration of the the vaccine, that needs super freezing, is obviously going to be an issue in rural areas. At current rates the first stage of health professionals will not be completed for a few more months and now they are promising to start the next stage, the elderly, before the first stage has barely progressed.

More meaty word like the continual promises to increase testing.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

My wife is a nurse and she spends all day visiting patients that are house bound. The patients have been asked to notify the nurses if they have had contact with people outside the Prefecture. If they have, the nurses have to get dressed in head to toe PPE on the patients doorstep. Then for 10 days after the patients last contact with the person from outside the Prefecture. This is all part of the job.

The real worry is the speed at which the medical staff are being vaccinated. As of last night just over 900,000 had received the 1st shot. The rate of 1st jabs is decreasing as they start the 2nd. How long before the 4 to 5 million medical staff get there shot?

These are the people we expect to look after us if we become sick and not just with Covid. At this time my wife has only received info on the side effects, no idea when she will get the shot.

https://www.mhlw.go.jp/stf/seisakunitsuite/bunya/vaccine_sesshujisseki.html

2 ( +3 / -1 )

"Wasn't the previous start date sometime in April?"

It still is,

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Splendid news for those with underlying health conditions and the elderly who may be afraid of socializing. The best way to deal with Covid or any disease for the healthy is to remain healthy in body and mind.

Carry on with your life, get plenty of exercise and enjoy yourself. Fear, lack of social contact and lack of exercise increases stress which makes us more vulnerable to viruses and any illness. It lowers the immune system and makes us less mentally and physically able to maintain a healthy balance.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@savethegaijin

Do you not qualify for the vaccine in Japan? I’d have thought with such conditions you’d be on a priority list to receive the vaccine earlier than the general population?

It may be quicker to jump on a plane and get it in your home country if that’s possible.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I hope the authorities in Japan will have the common sense to follow what is happening in the West. None of the so-called vaccines are reliable. Very dangerous side-effects and even deaths have been reported in several countries. Some side effects can de for the rest of the patients' life. They still do not know all the dangerous effects on the human organism simply because they are testing it on the world population. All mRNA technology is really a genetic experiment, this is very clear on the Moderna website. mRNA tech substitutes one's natural immune system for an artificial one, still an experiment. It also changes one's DNA, etc. Yahoo news, which is usually very liberal, posted that over 100 fully vaccinated people in Washington still got the covid, including some deaths: https://www.yahoo.com/gma/over-100-fully-vaccinated-people-115339262.html. I wonder if having the Olympics and boosting one's economy is worth gambling with human lives, and do governments should have this power? What I wrote can be easily checked in several reliable websites, Moderna itself is one of them.

-11 ( +1 / -12 )

The start of vaccination to the general public has gone from from Feb 12, to April 12, to May 10...

..at this rate the opening ceremony of the games to celebrate the overcoming of the pandemic will be a synchronised opening of 10,000 syringe packets, a brandishing of alcohol swabs with the 5 rings logo, then a mass vaccination of old folks with the Olympic flame in the background.

Dentsu...take note!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

So now there is some expert concern this virus is fully successful against new variations. So by the time vaccination starts, it will be a waste of money and effort.

Sputnik V is much better, cheaper, easily stored and can be quickly modified for new variants.

but obviously as it is Russian, certain western countries would sanction japan if we buy it.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Opps...NOT...this virus is NOT fully successful against new variations

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The slowness of this vaccine rollout is appalling. Although the UK has little to admire in respect of this pandemic, it has been vaccinating 800,000 people a day. Japan has managed 800,000 in more than a month. Yet again, the government has missed the window of opportunity. If the recent baseline increases in Osaka and Tokyo are due to a new variant that starts spreading, this promised late-April rollout will be too little too late and more people will die unnecessarily.

The LDP deserves harsh criticism for its slow response, which I hope will be reflected in the autumn elections.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@tanja

Yahoo news, which is usually very liberal, posted that over 100 fully vaccinated people in Washington still got the covid, including some deaths

This is exactly as expected in the early days of a mass vaccination campaign for a widespread and highly contagious disease. There is no 100% effective vaccine for any disease.

Meanwhile, you can look at figures and graphs for the vaccine rollout in countries around the world. In January, Britain had both high transmission rates and high death rates. The peak positive test rate (68,000) was January 8 and the peak for reported daily deaths was January 20th (1,826). In both cases, this was Britain's highest in the pandemic so far, and came on the back of a very steep rise starting in October but really spinning out of control shortly before the Christmas period. With the winter coming on, this was a disastrous rise, and a looming catastrophe for the health service.

But starting in December, Britain vaccinated far faster than most other countries, and the fastest of any country with such a large population and such high transmission numbers. The drop in infections and deaths since January has been dramatic: down to 10,000 positives by 25th February and 4,600 now (from 68,000, remember) and down to 345 deaths on February 26th, and just 51 on April 1.

You'll have to make your choice about what it is that has produced this precipitous drop in Britain, but seeing as antivaccine sentiment is so often against mask wearing, social distancing, or lockdowns, the other choices available may not appeal to you. And the vaccination rate in each country, combined with the varying transmission/death rate, does show that reduction closely tracks vaccination. Slower rollout, slower drop, but a drop nonetheless.

This shouldn't actually be a surprise though. It's how mass vaccination has been working since the beginning of the 20th century.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

The LDP deserves harsh criticism for its slow response, which I hope will be reflected in the autumn elections.

Oh, you sweet summer child. LDP will win it's usual landslide in the usual way. And meanwhile ordinary folks won't be vaccinated for another year or so. I'd go back and get it in the states, but I don't have enough vacation time to go there, get the shots and then sit out a quarantine on the way back in.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

And what about the rest of us? I have two autoimmune disorders as well as asthma. I would like to go out without being on the edge of a panic attack every day.

Most of my friends back in the States have already gotten the vaccine.

Go ask your doctor to put you on the list as soon as there is one...if you have more than one doc, ask them all to put you on a list.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@wipeout

It's no good wasting your time trying to convince anti-vaxxers. Even with all the data from countries such as Israel and the UK, they would still rather believe random Facebook posts. Luckily they are just a vocal minority, screaming theirs fears on the internet. The rest of us grown ups know the score.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

The slowness of this vaccine rollout is appalling. Although the UK has little to admire in respect of this pandemic, it has been vaccinating 800,000 people a day. Japan has managed 800,000 in more than a month.The LDP deserves harsh criticism for its slow response, which I hope will be reflected in the autumn elections.

One would hope so and in most functioning " democracies" govt with LDP record would be wiped out....alas TIJ, ...shooganai, gaman, there is no one better etc etc , Jiminto geriatrics will continue their almost 80 year rule..

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Japan's immunization campaign began in February, later than most major economies, and the Pfizer vaccine is the only one on offer.

Everything happening with 6 months delay around here in regards to vaccination.

In regards to infections no one knows as no one is tested and contact tracing is a mirage, as well are all aware by now.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I sometimes seem pessimistic, but the good point about the slow rollout is that there is more time for research and development. People sometimes forget these are emergency permissions with no long term trials.

i do recommend over 70s to take anything they can get. Nothing to lose.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

May, 10th! Really! I bet all the politicians already have their own shot! Just rediculas how slow the vaccine rollout in Japan is.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Only half the Japanese elderly want the vaccine so it shouldn't take too long to complete.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The elderly nowerdays were called babyboomers not so long ago and boom we did, oh boy.

Personally I‘d like a test at a reasonable price. Suspect to have had my encounter with the virus in March last year, but how to be sure?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I hope so, but they've blown by every other schedule due to some other critical shortage

1 ( +1 / -0 )

hope the authorities in Japan will have the common sense to follow what is happening in the West.

Unfortunately the rest of the comment is completely false, so there is no need for the authorities to follow imaginary dangers. The vaccine is safe and effective, there is no extra risk of side effects or deaths compared with the non vaccinated people, mRNA do not replace the natural immune response nor it has any possibility of changing your DNA

My recommendation is that you first find out a much better source of information before recommending other people to do it.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

It's not the number they receive but the number of inoculations which counts. If I add all their press announcements, they have received far more than those 890,000.

So, what's with the rest?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

i do recommend over 70s to take anything they can get. Nothing to lose.

Luckily, you are in no position to issue recommendations that anybody should listen to.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@ Virusrex

So you have been vaccinated already that you are able to state what is false or not?

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

So you have been vaccinated already that you are able to state what is false or not?

From where you get the idea you can only know the very clear scientific data that proves the safety and efficacy of vaccines if you had one? the vaccine do not gives you any special insight or knowledge, nor you need it to know anything I wrote.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

So, that is a clear no then.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

There is nothing like ‘subjective experience’ to really understand a given topic...

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

So, that is a clear no then.

Yes, you are mistaken. Vaccines do not give you basic research skills. Learning to read is enough.

On the other hand I, same asthe vast majority of the population, have been vaccinated repeatedly since early childhood, maybe that indicates at least some kind of opportunities to receive other things like a basic education, something that would prevent from having weird illogical ideas (like thinking you need to experience something personally to be able to read about it!)

And no, subjective experience is a terribly bad excuse to disregard scientific data on millions of vaccinated people. A woman having a child and saying her infant is fine drinking alcohol do not make it less false.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

That's enough from both of you on this thread, thanks. Bickering is not permitted on the discussion board.

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