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Japan happy as export ban on Atlantic bluefin tuna rejected

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Japanese conservation: Quick eat it before it's all gone!

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I am glad, I enjoy Bluefin Tuna sushi, would hate not to be able to eat it. If they become extinct sure I will not be able to eat it either, but that is the way of life. Things become extinct, people will probably be extinct one day. That is the way life works, wether its by human hands, or mother nature.

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Before sushi became popular in America, a Japanese sushi bar owner visited the fish market in New York and found the best part of tuna for sushi "toro" (the fat of tuna) was thrown out there. He, of course, jumped at it and his business a big success.

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Next time I eat sushi I will not eat the bluefin.

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Japan should celebrate and declare National Holiday and name it "Tuna Day"!

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I like the Americans saying "let's throw science out the door" which country teaches creationism as a fact?? Japan will learn when there's no more bluefin.

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They even held a reception Wednesday night for uncertain delegates that included plenty of bluefin sushi.

hehe... aren't we rubbing in a bit...

Fishing nations won a victory over environmentalists Thursday when a U.S.-backed proposal to ban export of the Atlantic bluefin tuna was overwhelmingly rejected at a U.N. wildlife meeting

I first supported the ban because I thought the proposal had the support of the world. Looks like only rich nation supported the proposal.

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Looks like only rich nation supported the proposal.

all 5 stars to your wonderful comment !

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If people are so concerned, why don't they donate money to help support the tuna breeding efforts??? Just what I thought...not really that concerned...

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I first supported the ban because I thought the proposal had the support >of the world. Looks like only rich nation supported the proposal.

Kenya is rich?

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Awesome! I am eating sushi tonite then!!!!

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Farmed and dangerous...I wonder if people understand that farmed fish are fed a lot of antibiotics to keep them healthy, and in addition there are contamination issues from dumping large amounts of feed in a confined space, and even more contamination issues from fish excrement in confined spaces. Keeping this in mind, the wild caught bluefin will always have a higher value and quality over farmed bluefin. Consequently, the wild stocks are likely to be targeted in spite of alternate breeding techniques...

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"I am glad, I enjoy Bluefin Tuna sushi, would hate not to be able to eat it. If they become extinct sure I will not be able to eat it either, but that is the way of life. Things become extinct, people will probably be extinct one day. That is the way life works, wether its by human hands, or mother nature."

With this kind of logic I'm sure the Japanese will lead the way in the extinction of the human race!

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let's see how happy they are when, if research is correct, there's no more bluefin in 5 - 10 years. i can hear em now. "oops, my bad"

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It'll be cold comfort in five or six years we'll be able to say, "We told you so."

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I am glad, I enjoy Bluefin Tuna sushi, would hate not to be able to eat it. If they become extinct sure I will not be able to eat it either, but that is the way of life. Things become extinct, people will probably be extinct one day. That is the way life works, wether its by human hands, or mother nature.

Sarcasm, right?

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The vote was 20 for, 68 against, and 30 abstentions.

Suggesting that Japan's lobbying is exclusively responsible for such a lopsided result is irresponsible journalism at best.

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Great. Lets just eat and destroy everything I say.

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jinjapan - right you are mate, but then it will be another fish and then another .... I am a bit surprised about the japs this time. They lose the old market spirit. Bluefin is going down worldwide and they know it; so here is the chance. Make it 10 times more expensive and make silly money while the Bluefin will recover. This they would have done a 100 years ago. But good old Japan is not anymore, they lost it. sharky1 .... I agree with you when it comes to fish farms (there are a few exceptions though = tiny 0.25 % market share of " ethic/bio " farms. But a Bluefin tuna you can not farm. I once caught a 10 kg (Southern Bluefin Tuna, small though but still legal) in NZ and it took me 2 hours by kayak to get it. The Southern is nothing compared to the Bluefin the jap market is used to, because it is much smaller. So whenever you eat some lovely sashimi, think about this beautiful strong fish and do it only on special occasions (not the thinking mate, the eating). If the japs would do this the same way (like they have done for many centuries) then there would be no trouble with the Bluefin stock/population/fishing rate. Peace

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Yes Kenya is rich, enough. If the fair dinkums were seriously fair dinkum theyd be sorry for attitudes like that. Wahooooooooo! Go serious lifestyle seekers!

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I wouldn't be happy about it. just relieved. Japan would have ignored it anyway. so whats to be happy about. An absolute ban is out of the question though. They need better restriction. What would Japan do with a tuna ban?!?! BUT that also brings to the table what is Japan going to do when there is NO TUNA!?! They need to realize that?

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Another testimony to the stupidity of humanity. We will bleed, burn, eat and pollute ourselves into extinction one day so some twit can have his or her favorite dish or thing. Maybe the world will be better off in the end without us.

Can't believe the Polar Bear skin issue. Human arrogance, selfishness and outright idiocy!

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Let Japan eat it all up. Environmentalists should eat as much as they can, too! When the stock is fully depleeted we can watch Japan blame gaijin for the problem.

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Japan won over scores of poorer nations

And how much money did it take to win over these poorer nations????????

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sharky1 at 07:47 AM JST - 19th March

If people are so concerned, why don't they donate money to help support the tuna breeding efforts??? Just what I thought...not really that concerned...

yeah Japan really wasn't concerned so they didn't donate money into an international fund to help poorer nations handle fewer fish. This would mean you understood the news, somehow, even though you are trying not to.

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If the blue fin tuna ever became extict the japanese would not give a rats arse...they would just move onto the next product and consume like locusts.

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Please someone save the newspaper for this, and donate it to your library or send it to me. That way we can pull it out in a few years and show how GLAD the world was.

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Morons. Myopic, self-serving morons, the lot of them. And when they've fished it to extinction, what will they target next?

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Congratulations Japan, you have shown how truly environmentally responsible you are. At least the whole world now knows what those of us living here have long known -- that Japan is all talk when it comes to moral/ethical issues. Nothing more. And never will be.

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This article from AP is incredibly slanted, but anyway...

“I feel more responsibly to work for the recovery of the species,” Miyahara said. “So it’s kind of a heavy decision for Japan too. The commitment is much heavier than before.”

Exactly.

Let's not let them forget this.

Stopping this stupid kneejerk proposal from Monaco (apparently sponsored by WWF with millions of dollars) is not the true victory.

The true victory will be ICCAT functioning as an effective management body. Hopefully this CITES fiasco will be the kick in the pants that the EU nation members need, and I trust that Japan and others too will play their part.

They will need to do a good job.

Because the NGOs that make up the commercial anti-use industry will be spewing their propaganda in any case (they can not admit it when they are wrong).

Hope now that we will see lots of political focus on ICCAT, like never before.

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jinjapan,

if research is correct, there's no more bluefin in 5 - 10 years.

That sort of research, like the claim about there being no more fish left in the oceans by 2048, are based on assumptions about management actions, such as "no good management decisions to address the problem are taken".

Of course, these assumptions are stupid, because if there is a problem there is a good chance that appropriate management actions would be taken.

Then this "research" is used as propaganda by groups who have anti-trade, anti-use agendas, as opposed to conservation agendas.

The power is with the politicians and authorities. Let's hope they put conservation goals ahead of their personal self-interests of getting re-elected, etc.

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Japan happy

20 years from now Japan will be happy to invent a synthetic bluefin jelly to squeeze over rice made from whipped algae, "trash" fish, color and artificial flavor. Real bluefin will be worth more than gold... if they are not extinct by then.

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herefornow,

Japan is all talk when it comes to moral/ethical issues.

This was an issue of jurisdiction for the Atlantic bluefin tuna fisheries. It's not a moral/ethical issue, it's a conservation issue.

And it would not have been "conservation" to impose a blanket international trade ban. That's just "non-use" philosophy.

In that scenario, everyone loses - both consumers, and the fishing industry and workers...

... everyone except the anti-use / non-use campaign groups such as WWF that need such issues to pull donations and support their own cushy lifestyles, tripping around the world to exotic locations for various meetings.

If only they could adjust their campaigns to be for sustainable-use based conservation, rather than irrational protectionism, they might actually be able to serve a more useful purpose in the world.

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Humans should be able to do whatever they want to animals. We are on the top of the food chain so until animals start figuring out ways of not getting eaten, I say we eat them.

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so what bribes were layed down to the poorer nations to get them to vote against this?

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Tuna getting extinct means that a very important role in the food chain will be missing with catastrophic consequences. It' not "just" a fish getting extinct.

I think humans should think more with their hearts and minds than with their stomach. And I must say that I LOVE tuna sushi and sashimi, though I do not approve this "greed". Let these poor animals "rest" for 1 year and then see...

We are a cancer to this planet.

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"It's not a moral/ethical issue, it's a conservation issue."

I am sorry but you are very wrong in this statement. Conseravation is indeed a moral issue.

We must consider the eco-system as our responsibility. We have the moral obligation to humanity, to our children, to future generations to preserve and care for the world we live in. We cannot divest ourselves of this moral responsibility out of convenience or rhetoric. Morality does indeed extend to our behavior with regard to the care for our planet and must be seen in this regard.

For too long we have tolerated people who refuse to accept accountability for the world around us. Our impact is too great and we know it. This knowledge means that we have political, social and moral obligations to address the problems. Denial, evasion and outright stupidity on the part of humanity is not acceptable. We need to preserve species, conserve what is left, clean up what we can and reduce our impact. The alternative is unacceptable.

If government and industry will not act, then we as consumers must act. Ban products on our own. If we refuse to buy from companies and countries that practice amoral environmental policies, then we help punish them for such behavior and may help influence change.

I am boycotting Maguro of any kind until Japan changes and adding it to a long list of other products I refuse to support. I hope more people will join me. Especially Japanese who care about the planet.

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davidatokyo -- nonsense. Plundering a scarce resource to simply please Japan's appetite for a species of fish that makes up 5% of their tuna imports is absoltely a moral/ethical choice. Nice try. But we all know how well Japan has followed the quotas that have been set to date. This ban was aimed strictly at Japan because the international community has realized Japan will never take the moral or ethical high-road. They simple bend or break the rules to suit their whim -- because they have the money to do it. All the illegal fishing folks are cheering today because Japan triumphed. And that is morally reprehensible. No different than those poaching rhinos and elephants in Africa. Please go back to your standard talking points. You are out of your league when discussing morals.

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If people are so concerned, why don't they donate money to help support the tuna breeding efforts??? Just what I thought...not really that concerned..

I'll second what sharky1 said about the environmental problems relating to fish farming, and add that it's truly sad that people think it's OK to keep creatures with a strong migratory instinct in the equivalent of a bathtub their whole lives, as if they were no different from tomatoes or runner beans.

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In two minds regarding this outcome. On one hand, I am glad that this proposal (in its current form) was defeated, because it might have led to a whole host of subsequent proposals regarding other species, species that are consumed by the less developed countries of the world.

On the other hand, however, I was rather disappointed by the tone of the reporting used vis-a-vis this issue and the defeat of the proposal. Rather than the shallow analysis offered by NHK on their morning news broadcasts (everyone can relax as Japan continues to eat tuna into extinction), I would have preferred a more cautious outlook regarding this whole issue. Indeed, rather than beating its chest and gloating at defeating both the Europeans and North America, as the country responsible for around 80% of the international trade in tuna, I would like to see Japan step up to the plate with some ideas regarding how this resource can be suitably managed. Then again, given Japan's past skulduggery regarding Southern Bluefin Tuna stocks, I am under no allusions that things will change significantly.

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David says:"if research is correct, there's no more bluefin in 5 - 10 years.

That sort of research, like the claim about there being no more fish left in the oceans by 2048, are based on assumptions about management actions, such as "no good management decisions to address the problem are taken".

Of course, these assumptions are stupid, because if there is a problem there is a good chance that appropriate management actions would be taken.

In fact such an assertion is stupid: Economic behaviour tells us that management of the commons DOES Not work - hence: 'the tradgedy of the commons'. HUman history is full of this in action. Lack of successful management (a human constant) predicts a decline and evetual collapse of a coomon stock.

Economic interests won the day. Which is to say that rational, utility self-maximising behaviour was considered ahea of the science which predicts stock collapse.

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ezekiel25 -- great post. Unfortunately, even the higher-ups in J-government have likely never heard of or understand the "law of the commons", (since it is not a Japanese theory), so your logic will fall on completely deaf ears.

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A couple orders of Negi-toro to go, please!

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a proposal at the meeting to ban the international sale of polar bear skins failed to pass.

they'll have them in Don Quixote by the weekend

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I wonder if the tuna are happy.

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e: Tragedy of the commons.

We actually have RMFOs (regional fisheries management organizations) where nations talk together and are supposed to take actions together to ensure that the sum of actions by the sum of their citizens does not bring about intended consequences for the resources they are utilising.

This is a solution to the tragedy of the commons issue.

But only if the nations that are party to the RMFOs fulfil their obligations.

So why don't they? Let's have better monitoring and regulation from the nations who let their people catch these fish. By all means. Let's reduce the quotas too. By all means.

I do not understand why some people here think that the nations who aren't doing their job properly through the ICCAT RMFO would make a better job of banning the international trade of tuna?

If you don't trust them to implement monitoring and regulations of fisheries, why do you trust them to implement monitoring and regulations of a trade ban?

The source of the problem is overfishing. If we are going to be angry with these nations we should cut to the chase and get angry with them over their lax oversight of their fishing industries and their often poor decision making through ICCAT.

Increasingly abundant whales resources get so much attention, but just imagine what might be possible if the pressure were diverted towards real problem areas such as Atlantic bluefin tuna?

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LOL

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species have been going extinct since the beginning of time due to over predation and climate change. why fight it?

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I suppose the only good thing about this is if the Bluefin Tuna stocks collapse then Japan's phony 'ECO-nation' pose will be exposed as the hypocritical posturing it is. We might also be able to get a few of those hypocritical politicians and businessmen behind the whole mess to commit suicide to 'take the blame'.

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I seriously doubt these "scientists" who say there'll be no more tuna in 10 years. However, humans will always find a way to compensate. Till then, let's enjoy sushi!

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davidattokyo -- again, nice try. But we all know that most of the problems associated with ICCAT were caused by Japan -- either by its continually exceeding of its quotas, or its wide-spread purchasing of bluefins from illegal fleets. Please, assume that the folks here have half a brain and can figure out that if Japan consumes 80% of the annual catch, and, ICCAT has not worked, then, Japan must be behind its failure. If A equals B, and B equals C, then A must equal C. Not law of the commons, just simple math that I hope even you can agree with.

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"Japan won over scores of poorer nations with a campaign that played on fears that a ban would devastate their economies..."

an with some very thick envelopes, no doubt.

"...Tokyo also raised doubts that such a radical move was scientifically sound."

Well, this is no biggy... the Japanese 'scientists' on this issue are really not renowned to be anything more than sushi aficianados who question anything that might not allow them to dip something in soy-sauce.

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What do you do when crab catches are low? You make imitation crab and sell it. Standby Japan, your blue fin in the future will come via dolphin, pork and cow entrails combo

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herefornow,

we all know that most of the problems associated with ICCAT were caused by Japan

LOL, I like your sarcastic tone :)

its continually exceeding of its quotas, or its wide-spread purchasing of bluefins from illegal fleets

Oh wait you are serious?

Tell me about this then.

http://www.oprt.or.jp/eng/e_news_100317.html

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Man you guys... stop thinking about who Japan will blame in 10 years time, and start thinking about a constructive approach that will ensure there are more tuna in 10 years time than there are today. Some of you people are just so so negative. Must be very gloomy where you wake up each morning.

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smithinjapan,

with some very thick envelopes, no doubt.

Maybe in your mind. But perhaps we should stick to reality.

Unless Japan's bribes are getting to the easily bought Australians, Chinese, etc.

"...Tokyo also raised doubts that such a radical move was scientifically sound."

Given that catches are higher than the amount of whale meat stocked in Japan (which is supposed to be "huge" according to anti-whaling campaigners), there are obviously quite a lot of tuna out there. Reduced to around 15% of pre-exploitation levels, apparently yes. Over-exploited, absolutely yes. Catch quotas should certainly be very conservative and probably cut further to ensure recovery to more productive levels, yes.

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Buggerlugs,

like the Americans saying "let's throw science out the door" which country teaches creationism as a fact??

She made a remark about the irresponsibility of ignoring science and you are disqualifying her credentials to comment based on the false notion that creationism is taught in American public schools?

Of course not. That would be foolish . . .

Or are you questioning her credentials based on the correct notion that some religious institutions in America, like everywhere else, preach creationism?

No, that doesn't make sense either . . .

Well, don't leave us hanging. Which country is it? And what does that have to do with Ms. Lieberman and the irresponsibility of ignoring the science surrounding this issue?

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Man you guys... stop thinking about who Japan will blame in 10 years time, and start thinking about a constructive approach that will ensure there are more tuna in 10 years time than there are today

There was one, stop international trade on bluefin tuna.

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RMFOs are clearly not working, otherwise we wouldn't have the situation of rapidly reducing rates of fish species in our oceans. A temporary ban in trade makes sense as it leaves abuse of the quota system (whichis endemic) out of the equation.

I remain sceptical anyway - economics tells us the utility maxismisuing behaviour will trump attempts to chnage behaviour every time anyway.

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Guess what I am eating for dinner tonight?

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Lol'd

Hooray! Go Japan! I <3 Maguro

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I'm gonna go out and celebrate this landmark victory, and eat nothing but tuna for a week! Stuff these Americans or European eco-terrorists and do-gooders, they obviously don't appreciate a good tuna steak or tuna sashimi. As some locals I know would say: "We Japanese don't like these gaijin telling us what we can and can't eat! This is Japan! THIS IS JAPAN! (tone/anger rising)"

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This may indeed be bad news for the bluefin, but doesn't the reporting (and the outcry) seem a bit narrow-focused? If I read the news correctly, in addition to the 'scores of poorer nations' (superb bit of factual reporting), the ban was also opposed by Peru, China, Canada, Australia, France, Spain and Italy, to name but a few. The only supporters for an outright ban were the US, Kenya and Norway. So how come Japan is the only enemy of planet? Or am I just over-reacting?

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Judyboots: Scanning through the headlines, the "enemy" depends on where you're reading the story. Some sources are pointing the finger at Lybia for killing this. Others are pointing at the EU. There are quite a few bloggers that insinuate Japan paid off everyone (98 countries? How can anyone take that seriously?)

Does anyone have a complete vote breakdown? I can't seem to find one.

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smithinjapan at 11:00 AM JST - 19th March "Japan won over scores of poorer nations with a campaign that played on fears that a ban would devastate their economies..." an with some very thick envelopes, no doubt.

And skorea just reaped the beneifits.

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gogogo,

There was one, stop international trade on bluefin tuna.

That's not a constructive approach, it's a destructive approach.

You folks need to use some imagination and think about solutions that will work in the real world where decisions have consequences not only for fish stocks but for people. If there are solutions that don't screw people over completely but do conserve the fish, then these are the solutions we should be opting for.

ezekiel25,

RMFOs are clearly not working

Indeed ICCAT hasn't worked well. So, it should be fixed, properly with constructive solutions.

A temporary ban in trade makes sense

Once CITES bans trade in something it is notoriously difficult to get it to un-ban it again. Just take a look at minke whales.

economics tells us the utility maxismisuing behaviour will trump attempts to chnage behaviour every time anyway.

OK, so politicians should change the economics with their hefty influence, no?

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Judyboots,

I also thought the article was totally slanted. E.g. the use of "rapacious" to describe Japanese consumers.

hokkaidoguy,

You won't find a vote break down. CITES has anonymous voting so as to ensure that politicians from vulnerable nations can vote they way they want without fear of reprisals from groups such as WWF who claim to be the only ones who know how to run the world.

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In ten years..........

"Hey! Oji-san! What did tuna taste like? Why are they extinct?"

As much as I would like to post a reply to these two question I'm sure the moderators would ban me!

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davidattokyo: "Man you guys... stop thinking about who Japan will blame in 10 years time, and start thinking about a constructive approach that will ensure there are more tuna in 10 years time than there are today."

A very constructive approach was just shot down, actually, and we all know FULL WELL that Japan (which consumes 80% of tuna) will whine and decry the loss of the fish, and blame everyone but themselves. That's what they usually do, on most issues where they purport to be victimized.

"Maybe in your mind. But perhaps we should stick to reality. Unless Japan's bribes are getting to the easily bought Australians, Chinese, etc."

Oh they very likely are 'cooperating' in a monetary sense with said countries on such issues. But I always find it funny when a Japanese delegate for a UN seat, or whaling, or against a tuna ban, or what have you, visits a completely unrelated country like Togo in Africa, and suddenly Togo pops onto the scene with a 'we are against this! or for that'. Yes, it's pretty clear that in some cases and on some issues Japan passes along promise of aid or simply bribes in exchange for support on such issues.

"I also thought the article was totally slanted. E.g. the use of "rapacious" to describe Japanese consumers."

Truth hurts.

Ossan: "And skorea just reaped the beneifits."

Glad you're not denying the obvious bribery. That SKorea may have accepted some, and I'm not sure why you think that's a jab, only shows how superficial the SKorean government is on the issue. Bad on them.

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davidattokyo I fully agree with you.

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Japan must decrease their consumption!!! everytime i see them eating and mmmmmmming sashimi and sushi, i think 'uhhhh it's soo cruel and sooo ancient'! why don't they just develop their types of dishes like china, they uncountable number of dishes not using so much of tuna but still outstanding...why dont u guys instead of developing fishing industry develop ur cuisines and enrich ur own cuisines instead of copying french italian or chinese

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smithinjapan,

A very constructive approach was just shot down, actually

Come on, the "constructive" approach wasn't going to work well for anyone except the anti-use NGOs who profit from it.

we all know FULL WELL that Japan (which consumes 80% of tuna) will whine and decry the

Wheee, there you go again. "Blame Japan".

suddenly Togo pops onto the scene with a 'we are against this! or for that'.

They have the similar issues. Look at various African countries. How are they going to develop and gain foreign exchange income if countries like the US and EU nations go around and mindlessly ban international trade in everything because some anti-use NGO says that it's the only way to save the world?

What these nations too need is sustainable use. Not no use. That's why they tend to vote with Japan.

Truth hurts.

Well gee ... what can I say.

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why don't they just develop their types of dishes like china, they uncountable number of dishes not using so much of tuna

Yes, they prefer shark fin soup there.

That's being discussed at this convention, too.

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Well there is the decision!

Japan and other fishing iduustries have won the vote to have the Tuna kept under the protection of Iccat.

Japan has won the right to continue to buy up 80% of the worlds tuna, and fisherman all over the world have retained their right to continue to sweep the oceans clean of BFT to pocket Japans massively high prices paid. Those that think ICCAt can, and will be overhauled to ensure the commmercial viability of tuna in the future are just kidding themselves, they have NEVER enforced quotas, have NEVER listened to their own scientists in lowering quotas, and take direction on quotas from the major BFT fishing nations.

This is a perfect example of sacrificing long term sustainability for short term profit. In the long run, this is going to cause more problems economically and environmentally than doing what needs to be done now.

Well I congratulate them on their win, and while i have not eaten BFT for many years as I didnt want to be a part of the problem, im off the buy some and will from now on enjoy it while I can.

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Celebrate while you can, selfish Sushi gluttons because you and Japan just killed the Bluefin tuna for good, or will soon. Thanks to you greedy freaks, my grandkids will never be able to enjoy not only Bluefin but many other species of fish you (and to be fair, other nations) have over fished for too long. I hope your grandkids enjoy Asian Soylent Green.

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A shark conservation proposal was defeated earlier this week and several other proposals to regulate the trade in endangered shark species are in trouble

I could imagine China taking the lead against shark conservation proposal.

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Kyoto plan came up, I don't remember US was supportive *during Bush government

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We are just killing the goose!!!

It's not just about extinction of one specie - tuna is a part of the ecosystem, if we take it out the chain reaction will start - the other populations will disappear or overgrown......... it's hard to predict what will happen. We might end up with ocean full of jellyfish...?? Species extinct and new evolve but in a span of thousands of years not overnight!!

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Denying future generations a supply line of food because of greed, in this case the Tuna, is not just irresponsible, unethical and repugnant. It's criminal and unforgivable.

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That's what a trade ban would do though ain't it.

We need Sustainable Fisheries.

Not No Fisheries.

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Davidtokoyo,

While i am very happy you are so nationalistic and supportive of your country, I also understand the japanese way, is to never, under any circumstances, criticize your governments decisions.

But that hardly puts you in a position to argue these subjects objectively.

An export trade ban, would have allowed BFT catches within each nations own EEZ, thus automatically implementing an enforced quota (they can only take what they can find), forcing nations to conserve BFT and give the BFT a fighting chance to recover.

But that's over now.

The japanese had better start finding recipes to make Jellyfish and road kill tasty, because when that is all that's left in the oceans, the rest of the nations are going to be ANGRY.

And for a tiny Island nation, with a massive population of 125 million, and almost NO natural resources, who needs the rest of the world for its very survival.....they are playing a VERY dangerous game.

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The same old bashing, over and over again. It's kind of sad. First start making a change yourselves before demanding other to do so. Or even better. Before thinking about the fishes, try erraticating world hunger.

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Sharyn: While i am very happy you are so nationalistic and supportive of your country, I also understand the japanese way, is to never, under any circumstances, criticize your governments decisions. But that hardly puts you in a position to argue these subjects objectively.

What about americans? Talking about objectivity and nationalism.

What they don´t get it the right way, they get it the very wrong way.

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You know what the J government should do on Monday? Put some restrictions on tuna. Unilaterally. Just do it. Show the world that this is not about the US and Japan, it is about doing the right thing. Stuffing our bellies full of a species headed for extinction is nothing to be proud of. If a ban is bad, well gluttony is not good. Japan should do something to show that reason has prevailed. I mean it has, hasn't it? I see a pretty big inconsistency between limiting CO2 and killing all the fish in the ocean.

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5SpeedRacer5

no one protested at all, and all those fisheries died. The two issues are not related to each other, because the fish don't actually care. If they are being vacuumed out of the seas faster than they are born then they are not going to protest either. It's a non-sequiter

Canada Failed. That is why I comment, in fact am entitled to comment being of a nation that already failed and who was hoping that Japan would LEARN instead of fail. Failure has now been chosen. History has already proven the methods.

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I'll second sf2k's "entitled to comment" post. I assume he is talking about cod, but Pacific salmon is now going the same way too. I guess this is a good time for the old "people who ignore history..." quote, but obviously it got ignored. As the world's economy turns into a zombie and/or outright collapses, this kind of short-term thinking is going to be seen everywhere, not just in fishing, even more. The short-term economic pressures will trump everything else.

And the celebratory tone on last night's NHK news was over-the-top. I really don't care about the opinions of the happy sushi shop owner.

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Extinction never tasted so sweet.

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The two issues are not related to each other, because the fish don't actually care. If they are being vacuumed out of the seas faster than they are born then they are not going to protest either.

If the fist can't be bothered, why should I?

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Sharyn,

I am not a Japanese citizen, most people can tell this from my handle.

I also understand the japanese way, is to never, under any circumstances, criticize your governments decisions.

Japans got the right policy in the marine resources area. Sustainable use. I support it.

Along with other countries, if we have improvement in implementation, the policy could become very much a reality globally.

An export trade ban, would have allowed BFT catches within each nations own EEZ, thus automatically implementing an enforced quota (they can only take what they can find), forcing nations to conserve BFT and give the BFT a fighting chance to recover.

You are living in a fantasy world. Just saying "oh gee there is an export trade ban" does not stop anyone from doing anything.

Without governments actually monitoring and enforcing regulations people can do whatever they please. This is what needs to happen - irrespective of whether a trade ban is implemented or management is left in the realm of ICCAT. Until governments actually do what they say they are going to do then we will have problems.

Instead of whinging about the Japanese all the time people need to face the reality and look at the actual source of the problem - if they are seriously hoping for solutions to be found.

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GJDailleult

yes thanks, I was referring to the Atlantic Cod which I watched in the 90's go from 'well, let's reduce the quotas then', to scandal to indefinite moratorium. I see the first stage happening here now. Not good.

Also as you noted salmon is going too or 'mysteriously' disappearing. Any news on that or is that now also a finished stock?

Canada is really bad at this, and are a good example of any well meaning industry trapped by pressure to not turn the tap off until there is nothing left. This is a feedback loop. Anyone would have gladly saved Japan the same fate I think. If we can't look at a bad example and say, hey don't do this, then we lose one of the good points of internationalization, peer pressure towards success and good ideas.

The high road could have been taken and that turn is coming up faster every year. What we do now affects how we handle it.

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Irodriquez,

The reason I single out japan, is they consume 80% of the worlds BFT, they drive the market by paying exorbitant prices.

I might agree with your comments on America, but not sure what it has to do with Blue fin tuna.

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Japans got the right policy in the marine resources area. Sustainable use. I support it.

Along with other countries, if we have improvement in implementation, the policy could become very much a reality globally.

Davidtokoyo,

You are joking right?

Would you like me to spend 2-3 hours pulling Japans history of "marine management" out of my files?

While a similar vein runs through the fishing policies of other nations, including the EU, japan outranks any other for mismanagement, lies and deceptions and cover ups and most of all consumption.

The problem could be solved by japan taking the lead and doing what needs to done now, an export ban...to protect the commercial viability of tuna for the future. This decision, led by japan, will have a devastating, long term impact on not only japan but us as well.

You are japanese, i would bet my life on it.

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Instead of whinging about the Japanese all the time people need to face the reality and look at the actual source of the problem - if they are seriously hoping for solutions to be found.

Um, how can japan NOT be the main source of the problem?

They eat most of the tuna caught anywhere in the world. They send fisheries agents all over the world, contracting to buy and pay high prices for any tuna caught. They tried and succeeded to take 1,500 hundred tonne of tuna over and above their limit for "research" purposes, while the tuna numbers were spiralling, in they lost a court case, and their quota dropped as punishment.

They have resisted every attempt to implement harsher quotas, and prefer to stay with the unworkable ICCAT, who allows them the freedom to continue unopposed.

The problem with the tuna numbers today, is a direct result of japans opposition to any conservation efforts. I would be very happy for you to explain to everyone WHY YOU think Japan is not the problem???????? Will be very interested in your answer!.

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Instead of whinging about the Japanese all the time people need to face the reality and look at the actual source of the problem - if they are seriously hoping for solutions to be found.

Wondering if you ever actually read the articles you comment on Davidattokyo. To wit:

"Japan won over scores of poorer nations with a campaign that played on fears that a ban would devastate their economies. Tokyo also raised doubts that such a radical move was scientifically sound."

It would seem Japan IS the source of the problem.

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sf2k;

Canada Failed. That is why I comment, in fact am entitled to comment being of a nation that already failed and who was hoping that Japan would LEARN instead of fail

Good point - that makes it all the more galling that Canada actually supported Japan in blocking this ban. You'd think we'd know better having experienced our own fisheries collapses.

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that makes it all the more galling that Canada actually supported Japan in blocking this ban

Yes it does Unaq and is quite ironic. That should be the last country allowed to vote! Canada steadfastly refused to believe they were completely fishing out and decimating cod....until they did. Sadly, the numbers never recovered and clearly never will now.

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start thinking about a constructive approach that will ensure there are more tuna in 10 years time than there are today.

there was one idea but...well you know.

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Indeed, most of us do DenDon. Unfortunately, Japan appears to live only for the day.

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Tigerlily4;

That (Canada)should be the last country allowed to vote!

Hardly last, and talking about who should be "allowed" to vote is nonsense - perhaps the UK, US, Russia, Germany, Norway should also be forbidden from voting due to their complicity in fisheries collapses? Try to spend less time demonising certain countries and more time proposing constructive solutions which involve working with all parties involved. If you can't get everything you want (e.g. total ban), move to the next best solution rather than ranting about the evil and barbaric Japanese, Canadians, European Unionians, ad nauseum.

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Try to spend less time demonising certain countries and more time proposing constructive solutions which involve working with all parties involved.

We can learn by reflecting upon that which has gone before. This is not demonisation. The Canadians refused to acknowledge they had decimated cod until it was too late and it seems unlikely the species will ever recover. Many feel the Japanese - who by their own admission led and rallied overturn of a ban on BFT fishing and exports - are following the same path. The Japanese eat 85% of BFT caught, will not support a ban on fishing for it nor suspension of its import/export. It is laughable to suggest there could still be room for compromise.

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It is laughable to suggest there could still be room for compromise

Spoken like a true zealot.

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UnagiDon / Tigerlily4

yes I was disappointed in our leadership, but if you know Canadian politics right now, its being taken over by the theocratic right, anti science etc. Our opposition is more interested in their cheques and not change.

We should not be shy about using our failures to help our friends avoid similar failures, especially when the topic is food!?! That's a missed teaching moment that could have gotten around all the stonewalling and instead spearheaded an international fund to help affected communities wane off the fishing and diversify their economies. I know if given the chance, that's what I would have done.

The vote may still have failed overall, but at least it would have been correct in respect to Canada's own history lessons.

Japan could have done that, and as the 80% consumer in the room, would have the clout to get it done.

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Japan as a BFT nation is in the drivers seat on price and pays a high premium for it, you'd think they'd be first in line to make sure that the stock still exists in ten years. If not Japanese themselves, no one else is really going to do that for them.

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"I first supported the ban because I thought the proposal had the support of the world. Looks like only rich nation supported the proposal."

It was purely because of an excellent and clever lobbying strategy that Japan was able to overturn what was initially a virtually united stand against continued fishing of the bluefin resource.

Although some have opined that it was a case of the poorer nations like Tunesia whose substanial fishing industry would have lost access to its major export market--Japan--that sunk the moritorium proposal, in fact it was Libiya (originally in favor) which after a secret visit from Japanese Fisheries Agency head, played the role of organizing the Arab countries and others by playing on hatred of America and its bullying. It worked to Japan's great delight.

The state of the depleted bluefin tuna resource had virtually no impact on the considerations of the nations that ended up voting against the ban.

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yeah the funny thing is that we all know BFT will be fished to extinction now... the shadenfreud will be fair dripping from those who enjoy a good "I told you so"

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To celebrate the BFT victory, I gorged myself on various sets of Maguro over the weekend..when in Rome....

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