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Kishida's office limiting reporter access despite COVID-19 rule easing

11 Comments

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Before the pandemic, more than 100 people, including freelance journalists, were able to enter the press conference room.

That's a good way to filter out more favourable media to get access to source.

3 ( +11 / -8 )

When asked Monday about why the restriction remains in place, Matsuno emphasized the importance of leaving sufficient space between participants to take preventive measures against the virus, saying it is crucial for the "government's crisis management efforts."

No need for the excuses. It is not like the J press corps fields tough questions to the LDP anyway.

7 ( +16 / -9 )

“We can’t … because of COVID.”

On the topic of COVID being used as an illogical reason for some action, I once had a waitress reject my request to have a burger sliced in half prior to being served. However, COVID apparently did not prevent the establishment from slicing the tomato that went on the burger.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

That would be because the main purpose of limiting the number of people was not covid, this is only making it more obvious.

No need for the excuses. It is not like the J press corps fields tough questions to the LDP anyway.

It is rare but some still do, just not the ones allowed access.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Simple, move the conference to a larger hall or space so everyone can have access.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

We already knew they have preferred treatment and approved stories regularly, why keep pretending

6 ( +8 / -2 )

It makes no difference, the media who belong to the 'Kisha Club' all share the same news, and report only what J-Gov tell them. It's not as it they are independent, free-thinking, investigative journalists there.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Ahhh Kishida, 1 step forward, ten steps back. Gotta love it.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

If there is a constitutional issue, someone can sue.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Better safe than sorry. I mean, who wants to risk uncomfortable questions?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

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