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Abe promises action after 2 homeless men denied typhoon refuge

22 Comments
By Karyn NISHIMURA

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"It is desirable to accept all affected people in shelters," he said, adding he would take measures to prevent similar cases.

Giving himself an out here when things don't go according to plan. The only reason he actually commented on this issue was because of the press this issue got from overseas.

Abe is extremely sensitive about issues like this because of the upcoming Olympics.

Otherwise he would not have given a crap about it!

13 ( +18 / -5 )

doesn't give a crap anyway Yubaru.... just more two-faced empty words.... tatemae rules! Abe and Japan certainly don't have a monopoly on that though.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

Well if the government local and national in the 3rd largest economy in the world can't provide shelter in normal times it's a streach to expect them to provide shelter in times of disaster.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe promised Tuesday to take action

How many promises he made so far?

10 ( +13 / -3 )

So, he will make the mayor take a deep bow and apologise. End of action.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

doesn't give a crap anyway Yubaru.... just more two-faced empty words.... tatemae rules! Abe and Japan certainly don't have a monopoly on that though.

VERY true!!

Well if the government local and national in the 3rd largest economy in the world can't provide shelter in normal times it's a streach to expect them to provide shelter in times of disaster.

Good point

How many promises he made so far?

LOL.

So, he will make the mayor take a deep bow and apologise. End of action.

If that...

1 ( +3 / -2 )

officials refused them entry because the shelters were meant for residents of the ward.

Are we just going to ignore the fact that these homeless people were turned away to fend for themselves against the unmeasurable power of nature itself because "the shelters were meant for residents of the ward."? That makes as much sense as turning someone from Osaka away at a restaurant or a hospital in Fukuoka or anywhere because "the food/service is meant for residents of that ward!"

Come on, now! Seriously?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

If the homeless are sleeping on the streets of Taito ward then they are residents of Taito ward, even if they don't have a piece of paper to prove it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Don't tell me, another pledge from Botchan? We all know what happens to all his pledges.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

My wife and I were discussing the reaction to this among Japanese. Interestingly, but not surprisingly, many Japanese were completely supportive of the ward's actions.

The truth is that many Japanese are less than sympathetic or even empathetic when the circumstances of others infringes on their own "rights" or even their comfort zone.

Which is why we have people in Tokyo that literally HATE women that get on trains / subways with strollers during rush hour. How dare they, they say!!! They should be more considerate of MY comfort, they think.

Truthfully, I have no doubt that the ward officials were merely reflecting the sentiments of the "residents" at the shelter who were "uncomfortable" with homeless people around them!!

How many Japanese do you know that actually sacrifice to help out the needy?!?! Not my problem, they say / think.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

If you read the other Japan today article about this it mentioned that there were shelters for 'travelers', i.e. not Japanese. I wonder how many got turned away from such places, the Japanese media are only making such a big deal out of it because the homeless people were Japanese

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Nope, it is time for Abe to win a couple of hearts back. He needs to open up the tatami room in his luxurious crib and let the 2 guys stay there.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Abe, apologizing for someone following a rule book written by his government? Actually, I kinda of feel sorry for the person who refused the homeless. (however outraged). If he/she ignored the rule book (written by the government) and allowed the person in, and many people complained about it, that person(s) would most likely have been scrutinized. It's a damned if you do, damned if you don't moment.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

“Interestingly, but not surprisingly, many Japanese were completely supportive of the ward's actions.”

And many were not supportive of the wards actions They have come in for a great deal of criticism.

“If you read the other Japan today article about this it mentioned that there were shelters for 'travelers', i.e. not Japanese.”

There were shelters designated for foreign tourists, and for people unable to get home, such as people who work in that area but live elsewhere, people who happened to be in the area for shopping or whatever., not just foreigners.

My opinion is that any shelter should be obligated to take anyone who shows up in the short run and if there are legitimate reasons to separate people in order to better serve their needs that can be done later when things have settled down enough to grasp a picture of what’s needed and movement can be organized by buses or such.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Japanese are obsessed with being successful in life. there were always big divisions in Japanese society, homeless people being on the bottom of the pyramid. hence the reason why homeless "don,t exist", because Japanese people in general (want to) ignore them. they just don,t care about them. and Abe doesn,t care. he,s just talking about it because this was big news in international media.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

A Taito Ward spokesman told AFP that officials refused them entry because the shelters were meant for residents of the ward.

They were residents of the ward. They just lived outside.

What would they have done if a family showed up with a cousin who was actually from Hokkaido? Would they have allowed the family to stay but refused the cousin?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

What would they have done if a family showed up with a cousin who was actually from Hokkaido? Would they have allowed the family to stay but refused the cousin?

ohhhhh, good question ..

1 ( +1 / -0 )

For an "advanced" country, this shows an appalling attitude.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

How many of the Homeless in Japan have mental issues ?

For the majority of those whom I have encountered, they are polite/shy yet "appear to have something missing upstairs" - I wonder why they aren't being taken care of by the State - many appear to be old, so I suspect that their family carers may have passed away, what happens to them thereafter - or are they simply forced onto the street ?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I meant to post my comment like this :

officials refused them entry because the shelters were meant for residents of the ward.

Are we just going to ignore the fact that these homeless people were turned away to fend for themselves against the unmeasurable power of nature itself because "the shelters were meant for residents of the ward."? That makes as much sense as turning someone from Osaka away at a restaurant or a hospital in Fukuoka or anywhere because "the food/service is meant for residents of that ward!

Come on, now! Seriously?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Homeless is a very minimum any government must work to help and provide to re-educate.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Fact is that Japan has reduced the numbers of homeless from 35,000 to 5,000. In America there are something like 500,000 homeless.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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