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Japan starts giving COVID-19 shots to citizens temporarily returning

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The government plans to operate the venues at Haneda and Narita airports through early January next year to administer two doses of Pfizer Inc.'s vaccine to people aged 12 and over who do not have certificates of residence in Japan.

They’ll have so many does they won’t know what to do with them all.

Japan has slipped so far behind current developments that it’s laughable.

6 ( +17 / -11 )

residents of some developing countries where the progress of vaccinations has been slow

They must mean someone like me.

I live in Japan and I'm considering a return trip to my home country of the US for a vaccination since my local town office has offered me a chance not until either October or November at best.

32 ( +39 / -7 )

Ridiculous, just a cheap stunt. There are so many in Japan who are yet to have their first jab.

38 ( +45 / -7 )

"When we live abroad, it is sometimes burdensome to receive medical services similar to those offered in Japan. I am thankful for this kind of measure," said a man in his 50s who has returned from Italy.

Italy? According to Reuters, “Italy has administered at least 68,507,301 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 56.8% of the country’s population.”

32 ( +35 / -3 )

WHAT??

Why can Japan just not just administer vaccines in a systematic, fair, age based way like in ALL OTHER DEVELOPED COUNTRIES?

31 ( +38 / -7 )

Interesting.

So far most covid cases are cause by Japanese nationality who prefer walking, shopping and drinking in busy areas.

Foreigners are not the cause of the increase in cases but if it is free on arrival than it motivate to travel. But taking the risk due the Delta version I will skip travel this year.

6 ( +15 / -9 )

Another of haphazard measure which defies logic - but serves as a great PR event for the govt - look how great we are in taking care of our nationals who suffer greatly working in developing countries……

Beyond pathetic

32 ( +36 / -4 )

So, people who don't live here get priority (quick, on the spot jabs) over us who live and work here and are raising families here? Yeah, that's fair. Further, through this program the govt is promoting and increasing international travel, which is the last thing it should be doing.

Japanese public policy can be a real head-scratcher.

30 ( +34 / -4 )

Smart Move, or have the embassies carry out this task.

-24 ( +2 / -26 )

we need a cure

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=liiVX55tJ7E

-16 ( +4 / -20 )

Really courting the votes of the not inconsiderable number of people who are actually in the country and can't even get a reservation for the first shot, aren't they?

Strikes me as contemptuous behaviour towards the people who elected you, but then what do I know.

22 ( +24 / -2 )

So, my Japanese friends who live in Funabashi, Kawasaki and Koto Ward but haven't even received their first shot yet should go to Haneda or Narita and line up with these returnees?

Cheesy propaganda stunt.

33 ( +38 / -5 )

Come on people, we know what this really is all about. The government is trying to suck up to the big international companies that have many workers abroad. Bring your workers back to Japan and we will vaccinate them, then they can return and make more money offshoring jobs to Vietnam, Thailand, etc.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Returnees can receive the inoculations either on the day of their return before undergoing a two-week quarantine period or after the period ends.

And people associated with the Olympics only have 3 days? Japanese citizens really need to get off their butts and do something about this!

10 ( +13 / -3 )

Smart Move, or have the embassies carry out this task.

Probably easier said than done!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

"In Vietnam where inoculations have not progressed, many people are feeling the inconvenience..." Hosoi said.

"In JAPAN where inoculations have not progressed, many people are feeling the inconvenience..." Hosoi said.

Fixed that for you.

22 ( +22 / -0 )

@davinda, just go.

Lay down proof of your US vaccinations, if you care to return to Japan when things are a bit more sane, and challenge the rules. That's been my way of life since I got off the teat, and that's a long, long time ago. Be a rebel. Take your life into your own hands. It's worth it.

Kindest regards from this six-time (total 40-weeks) visitor to Japan.

TPeace

Victoria, BC

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

@Alfie Noakes

So, my Japanese friends who live in Funabashi, Kawasaki and Koto Ward but haven't even received their first shot yet should go to Haneda or Narita and line up with these returnees?

I think this is valid only for Japanese passport holders who do not have a Jyuminhyou (residence) in Japan and working overseas on expat assignments. Govt knows these folks will travel back to Japan for Obon holidays and hence this plan, I guess..

The article states - "The government plans to operate the venues at Haneda and Narita airports through early January next year to administer two doses of Pfizer Inc.'s vaccine to people aged 12 and over who do not have certificates of residence in Japan."

But I agree with other posted above - this is a stunt, will promote more unwanted international travel and is a slap on the face of local residents in Japan who are paying taxes (these people who get priority are not paying local resident tax) and who are not able to get vaccinated - priorities are upside down!!!!

14 ( +16 / -2 )

Counterfeit Olympic passes would make a fortune. Three days of quarantine compared to 14. Nice

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

A PR for expats

While millions here in Japan have been waiting

15 ( +18 / -3 )

"In Vietnam where inoculations have not progressed, many people are feeling the inconvenience as they are restricted from going out,"

I think Vietnam is a typing mistake , instead of another country, any ones guess!

9 ( +10 / -1 )

@TrevorPeace

Lay down proof of your US vaccinations, if you care to return to Japan when things are a bit more sane, and challenge the rules. That's been my way of life since I got off the teat, and that's a long, long time ago. Be a rebel. Take your life into your own hands. It's worth it.

Kindest regards from this six-time (total 40-weeks) visitor to Japan.

So going back is being a "rebel"?

As permanent resident of Japan with nearly 20 years here, as well as 30 continuous years of living outside my "home" country of the US, I think our circumstances are a little different.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Good, speed vacinnations..

Vaccines for everybody..

GO JAPAN !!..

Let the haters bark.. lol..

-25 ( +3 / -28 )

Every person that gets vaccinated in Japan brings the country closer to normalcy. And, it protects people from a serious COVID-19 illness. Unfortunately, the vaccine does not protect against infection and people still need to wear a mask and social distance. (Recent studies show that fully vaccinated persons can still have a nasal infection and spread the disease. This is a worrisome characteristic of the D variant. The vaccines only protect against internal infection.)

2 ( +8 / -6 )

KentarogaijinToday  08:42 am JST

Good, speed vacinnations..

Vaccines for everybody..

GO JAPAN !!..

Let the haters bark.. lol..

Everyone except my son because our Tokyo ward is out of vaccine and now stopped all first dose vaccinations and couldn't open up to under 30 but may start again after August 15 but not sure if under 30 will be included.

Everyone but my just under 65 mother in law and my sister in law because their city in Saitama hasn't yet sent out the silly vouchers to under 65.

So we all needed to wait for our vouchers and age slots but these people jump the line.

And next we will read that one of them got home later got their vouchers ( because their official residency is still Japan under the registration system) and so they decided to do the same as the old man in Hokkaido that got 4 doses.

Woof woof.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

@JimToday 08:24 am JST

@Alfie Noakes

So, my Japanese friends who live in Funabashi, Kawasaki and Koto Ward but haven't even received their first shot yet should go to Haneda or Narita and line up with these returnees?

I think this is valid only for Japanese passport holders who do not have a Jyuminhyou (residence) in Japan and working overseas on expat assignments. Govt knows these folks will travel back to Japan for Obon holidays and hence this plan, I guess..

Which prompts the question: how many Japanese passport holders working overseas don't have a juminhyo? It would be interesting to know how many are likely to take up this offer. Also, is it really open to just every Japanese passport holder living abroad, and the no juminhyo rule is just a ruse?

My friends are really annoyed by the slowness of the vaccination programme and won't be happy to hear that non-residence taxpayers can have priority. Fair enough if they're up the Amazon or something, but complaining about countries like Italy which are ahead of Japan in vaccinations seems strange.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

divinda:

They must mean someone like me.

I live in Japan and I'm considering a return trip to my home country of the US for a vaccination since my local town office has offered me a chance not until either October or November at best.

I know, the cheek of it. I have relatives in Asia, Europe and the Americas and they have all had their vaccinations ages ago. As Luddite says, a cheap stunt, making Japan look like a saviour. Yes, Japan is more

advanced than some poor SE Asian or African country. We get it.

"When we live abroad, it is sometimes burdensome to receive medical services similar to those offered in Japan. I am thankful for this kind of measure," said a man in his 50s who has returned from Italy.

Or maybe he just hasn't bothered to learn the language and doesn't know how to access healthcare in Italy. Is that what he means by 'burdensome'?

10 ( +13 / -3 )

I think this is valid only for Japanese passport holders who do not have a Jyuminhyou (residence) in Japan and working overseas on expat assignments. 

No such thing in Theory.

Japanese nationals must maintain a Japanese residency of some sort even if it is the location of their family registry because they still must pay income tax and that includes city tax.

So these people will still have a Jyuminhyou at least in theory and the rules.

My ex-wife complained enough to my children about having to file he yearly tax papers during the 5 years her company had her working at their head office in Switzerland.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

The shots are offered for free, although returnees need to shoulder their own travel expenses. Applicants need to book reservations at a special website set up by the ministry, the officials said.

Reservations through a website--the US has been doing that since last December.

Weren't people here getting paper vouchers?

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

Those subject to the inoculations include people living in places where the progress of vaccinations has been slow.

Like in Japan……..

The government decided to start the inoculations for returnees before the Bon holiday season in mid-August after a Foreign Ministry survey showed many Japanese living abroad who have yet to be inoculated wish to receive vaccine shots in Japan, government officials said.

So people living in Japan and paying taxes, can’t return to their home countries, because returning would be a big two week isolation waste of time. Regardless of being vaccinated or not.

But Japanese living abroad can just arrive get their shots and leave without question?

the hell is going on?

I understand that Japan is the ruling Land of the Illogical, but they are just getting out of hand already.

Can one of the useless “lawmakers” make a steady game plan already and stick with it?

might as well bring back go to travel……..

11 ( +13 / -2 )

> Japanese nationals must maintain a Japanese residency of some sort even if it is the location of their family registry because they still must pay income tax and that includes city tax.

No, Japanese citizens can remove their residency registration if going abroad. And in doing so it removes the need to pay any J-tax, pension, or health insurance. I am absolutely sure of this.

My ex-wife complained enough to my children about having to file he yearly tax papers during the 5 years her company had her working at their head office in Switzerland.

Your ex may not have removed her residency status and was been paying these taxes because her company required her to.

My J-spouse has done this multiple times, even while we were married and we had an extended trip (2 years) abroad. Yet, in order for me to retain my PR status while we were away, I could not remove my residency (fair enough), and I had to pay J-tax/pension/insurance. Luckily I could move my residency to my spouse's family's house and had them manage the paperwork when necessary.

And on return, a J-citizen who then re-establishes their residency in Japan must do so within 2 weeks (or maybe 1 month, I forget) of re-entering Japan. They actually will inspect the passport for the entry stamp at the city office where you begin to live.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

This whole vaccine organization is a complete joke. So I see that returnees are getting shots, while people like my wife and me are on a waiting list to get our first shots. Anyone who can vote later this year, remember this when you cast your vote.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

LOL. Thanks Jsapc!

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

"When we live abroad, it is sometimes burdensome to receive medical services similar to those offered in Japan. I am thankful for this kind of measure," said a man in his 50s who has returned from Italy.

I find it REALLY hard to believe that a man in his 50s was not able to get vaccinated in Italy. Perhaps he doesn't speak Italian?

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Better late than never in my opinion. Ain't gonna look a gift horse in the mouth. Happy for them i guess. My family and i am already fully vaccinated, so i probably don't have that much anger compare to most posters here. We should be glad for those who work overseas that they are given a opportunity to receive a shot.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Those subject to the inoculations include people living in places that use vaccines not approved by Japan as well as residents of some developing countries where the progress of vaccinations has been slow.

"...not approved by Japan..." makes it sound like Japan is desperately trying to remain relevant, at least to its nationals residing out of the country, as its credibility (and authority) within its borders has been reduced to smithereens due to its own doing...

"...developing countries where the progress of vaccinations has been slow". This sounds like Japan in a nutshell....

More seriously, if they want to take care of the nationals in those countries, they could do that through their embassies which would make more sense than waiting for people to come here or for them to spend the money and time (in quarantine) to come here.

Essentially, it seems that Japan is expecting a lot of the nationals to come to Japan which is something I sincerely doubt.

First, the nationals abroad read and watch the news in Japanese language (you know that "internet"-thingy which has been around since the mid-90's). They should therefore know that (1) the pandemic is no way under control in Japan on the contrary, (2) that the government effed up skyhigh on (a) the pandemic, (b) the vaccination and (c) has an infatuation with the Olympics which did not exactly help with the Paralympics poised to become the next battleground. I doubt that in those conditions many are willing to come. Also, if considering "vaccine shopping/travel", this may work in some countries but as per the above, not for Japan as per the above.

As usual, Japan only sees the "Japan-side" of things. Like the quarantine when coming here: you get your shot, get quarantined (hence; just end up locked in a hotel in Japan, so much for O-Bon), then what: go back and get your second shot on your way out, then...get home and get quarantined again abroad. Also, if I recall, vaccine passports are still being "discussed" in Japan and did not yet go anywhere, especially to outside recognition.

Basically, you come for O-bon, get to see a hotel-room for 2 weeks, have used up your holidays and go home to be locked up again. Great holidays, wished you were here..., eh?

Second, the medical association of Japan has asked the government to declare a national state of emergency. So, forget "O-bon" and travel criss-cross across the country. On the contrary, the government should try to discourage / prevent people to travel around the country at all costs and limit the in-take from the outside (nationals residing abroad and non-national tourists). I understood that over the Olympics the in-take from abroad had already been limited over the Olympics/Paralympics period...

Third, around me (colleagues, friends, etc), I have yet to see anybody willing / planning to travel anywhere since the first SOE back in 2020. Hence, no O-bon, no summer holidays, no autumn leaves, no year-end gathering with family and friends in 2020 and same on the menu for 2021.

Having said that, these are the people I know and from the news, a lot of people I don't know seem to not care about anything (health, life, all of us) any more, so 2021 O-Bon looking like it generally does could lead us to a very bleak place, I mean bleaker than now. The government has no choice, it has to kill off O-Bon for the nationals in-land and out of the country.

Long story short: either this is a PR-stunt (it's Kyodo anyway), or the LDP oyajis are off their rockers again and this will not survive until O-Bon anyway...

Anyway, this is just more non-viable hubris from the LDP.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Pukey

Is that what he means by 'burdensome'?

I imagine he means having to rely on non-Japanese nurses and doctors for their healthcare. Like the Japanese in Japan who decided they didn't like the 1,000s of Indonesian and Filipino intern careworkers and nurses a few years ago, and who have since returned home after a very short and unsuccessful stay in a country that didnt want them.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

@blue

Ok I will criticize Japan when needed but Japan is far from the only country to only recognise Vaccination based on what is locally approved.

Canada will permit those vaccinated to skip quarantine but only if vaccinated with a vaccine approved in Canada.

So only Pfizer, Moderna, AZ and J&J any other vaccine those arriving need to quarantine.

This type of situation is becoming the norm and is the reasoning behind AZ applying for approval in the USA.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

divindaToday  09:34 am JST

No, Japanese citizens can remove their residency registration if going abroad. And in doing so it removes the need to pay any J-tax, pension, or health insurance. I am absolutely sure of this.

Absolutely true.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

I might. And I might not. Nothing to do with my comment.

And I wasn't responding to you. So why are you asnwering to this? Do you have multiple accounts?

And the issue of vulgarity is subjective, isn't it?

Not really.

So if I am insulted by someone or someone makes a 'vulgar' remark towards me on this anonymous site--so what?

The vulgar remark wasn't adressed to me either. I simply noted that it was very vulgar and offensive. And I will do the same anytime someone decides that crass insults are a form of argumentation. Don't like it? Don't be vulgar. Pretty simple.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

residents of some developing countries where the progress of vaccinations has been slow.

Like Japan and the Japanese?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Vaccines for everybody..

GO JAPAN !!..

Let the haters bark.. lol..

vaccines that millions of Japanese cant get because of a supply shortage and just a pathetic rollout.

let the ignorant bark at their own arrogance.. lol

2 ( +6 / -4 )

All the countries mentioned like Vietnam and Italy have had a far superior response to the virus than Japan has. I don't know what the man in his 50's, returning from Italy is rambling on about.

Shocking prejudice from Japan. I'd focus on my own slow, burdensome vaccination program if I was you.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

"When we live abroad, it is sometimes burdensome to receive medical services similar to those offered in Japan. I am thankful for this kind of measure," said a man in his 50s who has returned from Italy.

What was burdensome in getting vaccinated in Italy? Italy started vaccinations (Pfizer and Moderna) in December. When did Japan start?

No excuse for this guy not getting his shots overseas. What a silly comment by him.

Japan was burdensome for me though, since their shots were not available earlier, and no way are their medical services similar to those offered in the US, so I left this country to get vaccinated in the US this Spring.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

No, Japanese citizens can remove their residency registration if going abroad. And in doing so it removes the need to pay any J-tax, pension, or health insurance. I am absolutely sure of this.

i am no expert on this but as far as I was told by my accountant.

The laws were changed ba few years back because people were using this loophole to avoid gift and inheritance tax.

Now one still has to file for 5 years after leaving Japan and only after 5 years is ones residency actually removed.

I knew several very Rick Japanese that would send their children to live in Canada were there is no gift or inheritance tax then gift them large sums of money.

This was the reason for the rule change.

Again that is what my account said and what was said in information given out by certain embassies

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Instead of giving its people the jabs, the Japanese government has been sending these vaccines towards the ASEAN because they fear China winning so much.

https://thediplomat.com/2021/06/japan-steps-up-its-vaccine-diplomacy-in-southeast-asia/

Regardless of this effort, it is still nothing but hot gas. Japanese people suffer at the hands of fantasizing elites who can't wake up from the dreams of the 1980s.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

I’ve been waiting patiently to receive my vaccine voucher and haven’t even been able to make a reservation yet. Why are people living overseas able to jump the queue?

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Japanese nationals must maintain a Japanese residency of some sort even if it is the location of their family registry because they still must pay income tax and that includes city tax.

Japanese passport holder here. The above is not correct.

Actually you are required to remove your 住民票 before leaving the country if you are moving abroad. What stays with you is your 本籍.

Regarding taxation, most if not all countries except for the US have a 181-day rule regarding taxation of income. So if you spend more than half a year abroad, you do not have to pay taxes in Japan. There can be a few exceptions to that rule, e.g. if you have real estate which you are renting out while being abroad as this would be considered as income.

Other than that, don't bother getting vaccinated, whatever country you're in. It is just not necessary.

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

Dear people that do not understand vaccine approval process.

If you want Chinese or Russian vaccine then have those countries formally request approval and start the approval process including the mandatory local trials just like all the others.

Pfizer, requested did trials got approved.

Moderna, requested did trials got approved.

AZ, requested did trials got approved.

J&J requested in trial period not approved yet.

Novavax, requested in trial period not approved yet.

China and Russia have applied.

So please stop

0 ( +3 / -3 )

i am no expert on this but as far as I was told by my accountant.

The laws were changed ba few years back because people were using this loophole to avoid gift and inheritance tax.

Maybe there's a change for inheritance tax laws, but a J-citizen can still remove their residency from Japan if going abroad and be exempt from local taxes/pension/insurance. However, in doing so they will also be unable to receive some services.

Look up 住民票を抜く for links about removing residency. Its done through local city offices. Heres the procedure info from Edogawa Ward

https://www.city.edogawa.tokyo.jp/e031/qa/kurashi/todokede/kokugai_tenshutsu.html

But again, you will lose benefits, especially health insurance. As it is (was?) J-citizens (or any resident in Japan, including foreigners) were still covered by the National Health Insurance System when traveling abroad. Yes, the Japanese health insurance covered you as a form of travel insurance (I actually broke a bone abroad once and got a rebate on the foreign hospital fee when I applied for it upon returning to Japan). However, if a J-citizen removed their residency, they are no longer covered by the National Insurance since they are no longer enrolled and paying in (sadly, I think they're removing/limiting this foreign coverage benefit due to abuse of the system you mentioned. I'm not sure if its been removed yet though).

And if the removed-residency J-citizen were to visit back to Japan briefly while still not enrolled and paying National Health Insurance, they would then need to pay the full fee at a domestic Japanese hospital if they needed treatment.

However for pension collection, someone without residence can still receive their monthly pension.

So maybe inheritance is different, but not the removal of residency.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Back on topic please.

I could understand those living in Vietnam returning for a jab in Japan. but Italy? I think the guy just wanted an FOC trip to come back to Japan. All expenses paid by his company, perhaps.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Question: Japanese nationals resident abroad may have families made of, well, local (read: foreign) nationals; non-Japanese spouse/kids/parents. I assume the family would travel all together to Japan. What about them?

Just asking, as the Japanese nationals and resident foreign nationals in Japan would just love to be told that non-resident non-nationals could jump the queue in which they have been stuck for more than half a year...

On the other hand, if non-resident Japanese come to Japan with their families, they would just love having their beloved one being ignored.

Either way, some people owning Japanese passports are going to be angry, very angry. Me think, the LDP just managed to open (yet) another can of worms...

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I’ve been waiting patiently to receive my vaccine voucher and haven’t even been able to make a reservation yet. 

I was offered to get vaccinated at my company's office two months ago. I (and most coworkers in my team refused).

I was sent the vouchers from the city office a few weeks ago. Returned them unopened as unsolicited mail.

I suggest you do the same. Alternatively dispose of it in the shredder.

-12 ( +4 / -16 )

I'm in my 40s, I just got my 2nd shot yesterday.

To those who want to be vaccinated I suggest you stop wasting time repeating same senseless drivel the whole day every day and use the time instead to look for a way to get the shots.

I know the chances of finding shots at this time are probably infinitesimal for some but might as well try. Who knows, you might get lucky.

But just staying here wasting time exchanging drivel with others is a sure way not to get it

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

I wonder how these medical workers were found? They must have been taken away from other sites where they could vaccinate the general populace.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Is Japan still requiring that the shot givers are all full-blown surgeons and MDs, or are they allowing nurses and whatnot to administer the shots now, too? I'm just surprised to see people being told they have to wait until November.

I'll admit I was somewhat weirded out to get my shot from a 19-year old volunteer firefighter/EMT (here in Massachusetts, US), but then again my arm didn't fall off so I suppose it's all good...

5 ( +5 / -0 )

If a J-citizen who has removed their residency to live abroad temporarily returns to Japan to get the Covid vaccination, why is it free for them?

As mentioned in my off-topic comment, when removing residency one also un-enrolls and stops paying into the National Health Insurance System, which is the entity of the government which is paying for the vaccines.

Why should any non-paying non-resident get vaccination priority over all the insurance paying residents?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

And here where I live I didn't get even the letter yet despite being living here from years and paying the taxes like everyone,again Japan is a champion of inequality.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Meanwhile, those who live here and pay taxes will be lucky to receive their FIRST shot this year if we’re lucky (and not senior).

1 ( +4 / -3 )

This piece is PR meant to convince the outside world that the J government is doing well with its vaccine roll out.

Those who live in Japan, Japanese and non-Japanese, know otherwise.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

For those that really want to get a vaccine now, my advice would be to return to your home country where things are much more efficient and to wait two weeks. After the two weeks are up come back to Japan where (having your approved vaccine) quarantine should not be an issue.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

not-vaccinated:

Famous last words of some people who succumbed to the virus in hospital:

I wished I'd taken the vaccine.

Famous words of doctors before going onto next patient:

It's too late to have the vaccine now. It doesn't work like that.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It's too late to have the vaccine now. It doesn't work like that.

I haven't put on a mask since the very beginning of your game. I was never interested in playing it at all. And I didn't want the vaccine last year, I don't want it now and I'm not needing it next year.

Unlike a lot of ppl who change their minds over time, my decisions are final.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

''''

When I grow up I will also invest in vaccines.

Jacobo

0 ( +0 / -0 )

$10 billion into $200 billion worth of economic benefit.

Investing in global health organizations aimed at increasing access to vaccines creates a 20-to-1 return, the Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates says.

When I grow up I will also invest in vaccines.

Jacobo

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Those subject to the inoculations include people living in places that use vaccines not approved by Japan as well as residents of some developing countries where the progress of vaccinations has been slow.

So that means that any Japanese people living and working in the UK and, like the majority of the UK, was given the AZ vaccine can't return home because the Japanese government doesn't recognise that vaccine? How about next year when tourists may be allowed back in (I can dream)... with those who've had the AZ vaccine be turned away?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

...as well as residents of some developing countries where the progress of vaccinations has been slow.

So... like... Japan?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

So that means that any Japanese people living and working in the UK and, like the majority of the UK, was given the AZ vaccine can't return home because the Japanese government doesn't recognise that vaccine?

The Japan government approved AZ months ago. In fact, they have a huge stockpile of it, as the citizenry isn't interested in it due to its perception of low efficacy. That's why the government has given away millions of AZ doses to other countries.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I was sent the vouchers from the city office a few weeks ago. Returned them unopened as unsolicited mail.

I suggest you do the same. Alternatively dispose of it in the shredder.

Nah. Because I'm not an idiot. I just got my 2nd shot two days ago.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Won't help. Evidence is that if you have had your 2 shots, you have a higher chance of death should you catch the VIRUS should you have had only 1 or no shots at all...

The CCP has engineered this virus... it's only a matter of time, before the Truth will come out.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Several of those who have received their shots, are wandering around face-mask less, and are careless to the actual nature of the virus we're dealing with. These persons are the careless / selfish Idiots - not those whom refuse to be forced to take a vaccination which if you are a vegan may go against your own beliefs.

Even if you have jumped onto the Vaccination bandwagon, please do not drop your guard, and stop being cautious - continue to wear face-masks in public, continue to wash hands regularly, and ideally if you return home from a public event/shopping trip - completely change your clothing and shower before going about your other business on that day.

I see too many idiots around my locality such that I would advise not going anywhere near it - please, for your own health and safety avoid the Akasaka/Roppongi/Azabu-Juban areas within Minato-ku Tokyo, those are the most likely where you are to find people wandering around without facemasks... not all Foreigners, but many.

Be safe.

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