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Scientists develop salt-resistant rice variety

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Japan’s Kanto plain is a prime candidate for the new strain.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

And another GMO to avoid.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

That will be handy when the Kanto plain becomes the Kanto flood plain.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

GMO rice? Next will be GMO water.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Great work, hopefully instead of taking 30 years to breed this trait into usable varieties they can use gene editing to quickly move this into rice varieties already in the pipeline.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If the world population decreases , there will be no need to change the way we grow our food

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Lamilly

Excellent point. Birthrates are continuing to fall dramatically around the world and the world population is likely to peak before 2050.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If the world population decreases , there will be no need to change the way we grow our food

Are you proposing something?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

And another GMO to avoid

Doesn't seem to be gmo, just crossbreeding

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Historical records show that for over 3500 years, the tiny state of Goa in Western India is home to rice cultivation in saline water conditions. The Goa rivers originate in the Western Ghats and flow in the Arabian Sea. At high tides, saline sea water from the Arabian Sea enters the riverine belts. The human managed khazan lands along the rivers Terekhol, Chapora, Baga, Mapusa, Mandovi, Zuari, Sal, Saleri, Talpona, and Galjibag are interesting ecosystems. Here tidal influence is regulated through a highly structured system of dykes, canals, furrows, and sluice gates using local resources. The rice cultivated on the khazan lands is special, tasty, and goes down well with coconut-curry-fish-accompaniments.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Don't know much about rice growing, but love eating it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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