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Japan to build central database to bolster remote island monitoring

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And why hasn't this been done long ago? It's not like the technology wasnt there.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

will the database prevent "erosion" and islands "vanishing"? sounds like cobblers to me....

3 ( +3 / -0 )

And why hasn't this been done long ago? It's not like the technology wasnt there.

Just because a technology exists doesn't mean Japan will utilize it. We have a plethora of examples of Japan not embracing a readily available technology. I would provide specific examples, but the mods think that that would magically make my post "Off-topic."

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Japan is the 6th largest country including the maritime zone. However the authorities should aim more the own territory islands and not the islands in dispute with another countries, to say 3 of them at this moment. Some islands are going to be more in dispute in geopolitical issues...A defender to be spy or a spy to be a defender. China complains Okinotori is just a "rock"...How many of them China possessed in South East Asia maritime areas nad zones?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

As Yubaru said - strange that Japanese territory hasn't been monitored constantly with the tech that's been available for years. Could only be because funds were not diverted to such or that next-in-line-for-the-job-buffoons such as Sakurada Yoshitaka ( the Minister for Cyber -Security who had never used a computer and didn't know what a USB was) were in charge.

And Alexandre T. - you are correct in stating China's complaint against Okinotori being just a rock when many of it's own SC Sea developments being similar.

Neither the Chinese man-made islands and Okinotori deserve natural island status and an accompanying 200 nautical mile EEZ zone.

This is definitely why the Japanese govt has not been more outwardly critical of China's rock development because they can be accused of doing the same.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Central databases are obsolete these days. Decentralized everything is the way to go.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Central databases are obsolete these days. Decentralized everything is the way to go.

Wow, an entirely blanket statement that is entirely incorrect.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

"entirely incorrect" would also be a blanket statement :) I have good reason to feel that centralized databases are obsolete, and if that comes out as a blanket statement, I'll stand by it anyway! I've seen too much effort spent on failed attempts at centralization.

If the Cabinet Office and Japan Coast Guard have good reason for this information to be centralized in a centralized database, I'd love to see their rationale, maybe I could learn something from it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And why hasn't this been done long ago?

In IT circles there's this thing called Conway's law. I'd say, this is result of that - in short, due to historical organizational structure. It'll be a tough slog for this to live up to its billing, and probably won't in the end.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@ jiji Xx

No, the database will not prevent it on its own, but it will allow the government to enlarge the islands if they show signs of shrinking, like the do with Okinotorijima.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I have good reason to feel that centralized databases are obsolete, and if that comes out as a blanket statement, I'll stand by it anyway! I've seen too much effort 

Good for you. Our company runs dozens of databases for dozens of clients. The overwhelming majority are not decentralized, as there is zero reason to do so, and therefore no reason whatsoever to put in the additional work to decentralize them, not any reason to add the additional overhead that would require. And that’s the industry standard I’ll add, not just our company.

Your statement is akin to saying ‘cars are outdated now that we have airplanes’.

If you think centralized databases are outdated please explain how adding additional development time and processing overhead to systems that don’t need it is outdated.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Wouldn't it be cheaper to send some folks to live there and give them some tax incentives, free land!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

oh no! a database??!?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

China has argued that Okinotori is just a "rock"

So are china's fake islands that they built on other people's waters. Idiots.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Forget databases.

What Japan needs to do is to put missiles on those islands, especially the ones that unfriendly neighbors keeps intruding upon.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The overwhelming majority are not decentralized, as there is zero reason to do so, and therefore no reason whatsoever to put in the additional work to decentralize them, not any reason to add the additional overhead that would require.

So you are saying that your databases are just naturally as they are - just databases. That’s not what I mean by central or centralized databases - in this case cutting across different organizations.

Here the news suggests the additional work is to centralize what is not currently centralized. That’s what I’d push back on (as opposed to some specific choice of database technology, which I suppose you might have interpreted my comment as suggesting).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So you are saying that your databases are just naturally as they are - just databases.

Bingo. Which is why I said this was a blanket and incorrect statement:

Central databases are obsolete these days. Decentralized everything is the way to go.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I was told that the seawater increased so that the island used as a boundary point was submerged.

It was originally a thick island, but other local fishermen reported that it had disappeared.

In order to be recognized as an island to claim territories, it is said that there must be a type of island at high tide. But the island that was cloudy Now it is almost invisible at high tide.

 When there is no island at the boundary point, it makes a database because it makes a different sound while invading the sea.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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