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Japan to conduct first major survey on racism: report

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Japan’s parliament in June brought in legislation promoting efforts to eliminate discriminatory speech and behaviour

But did they make it a crime?

7 ( +14 / -7 )

Well, well, well, after all these years the government finally gets around to doing something.

But I am not going to hold my breath that the results will bring effective changes.

I doubt that I will see one of these survey's seeing as how I became naturalized here, but I would love to see JT have an open thread, that allows people who DO get a survey to share the information requested and maybe their responses as well.

12 ( +16 / -4 )

Nicknamed the "Can of Worms" study.

17 ( +19 / -2 )

Good for them. They're certainly doing a lot more to combat this than hundreds of other countries.

But I don't agree with criminalizing hateful speech. For sure though, some that believe in 'freedom of speech' in their home countries, and rally against excessive political correctness, would absolutely condone zero freedom of speech in Japan when it comes to these types of things.

By the way, I don't particularly see fault with anyone saying bad things about a Pyongyang-linked school (that the Japanse government actually funds, believe it or not). Think about it, these are schools that have portraits of the dear leader(s) and indoctrinate their students in the North Korean ideology. And last time I checked, that ideology certainly wasn't Japan friendly. It's like having a school in your home country that praises ISIS openly and teaches their students to hate all things American and funds the ISIS regime. Insanity.

-5 ( +12 / -17 )

But did they make it a crime?

While it's relatively new, yes there is an "Anti-Hate Speech" law. Enforcement of the law is another thing though.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

So here’s the one law you need to know that should terminate her presidential campaign: For those of us who do not have United States Code committed to memory, here’s what it says:”(a) Whoever willfully and unlawfully conceals, removes, mutilates, obliterates, or destroys, or attempts to do so, or, with intent to do so takes and carries away any record, proceeding, map, book, paper, document, or other thing, filed or deposited with any clerk or officer of any court of the United States, or in any public office, or with any judicial or public officer of the United States, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than three years, or both. (b) Whoever, having the custody of any such record, proceeding, map, book, document, paper, or other thing, willfully and unlawfully conceals, removes, mutilates, obliterates, falsifies, or destroys the same, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than three years, or both; and shall forfeit his office and be disqualified from holding any office under the United States. As used in this subsection, the term “office” does not include the office held by any person as a retired officer of the Armed Forces of the United States.”

-37 ( +2 / -39 )

The construction of the questions and the definitions they use will be important. Like Yubaru, I'd like to see the survey in real time, as it were.

13 ( +14 / -1 )

Easy to do. Just go to the many drinking places that the average Japanese man can go to in a place like Yokosuka that are near the Navy base, but have the "No Foreigners" sign posted outside, or the touts that don't allow us gaijin to enter. Even when we may be fluent in Japanese, still no entry for foreigners.

16 ( +17 / -1 )

and what action they want the government to take to eliminate discrimination, it added They should start with looking within.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japan should just move into the 21st century and pay regard to how other countries treat residents and amend laws accordingly, it's that simple.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

We all know there is no racism in Japan!!!!!:-/.

12 ( +14 / -2 )

Alphaape: Easy to do. Just go to the many drinking places that the average Japanese man can go to in a place like Yokosuka that are near the Navy base, but have the "No Foreigners" sign posted outside, or the touts that don't allow us gaijin to enter. Even when we may be fluent in Japanese, still no entry for foreigners.

Do you know if anyone's tried disguising themselves with makeup, to get in?

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Can we volunteer to be surveyed?

"The number of foreign residents in Japan has increased in recent years but their ratio to the total population is still low, standing at below 2.0 percent, according to justice ministry data."

I remember when it passed the 1% mark.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Very much agree with mitoguitarman, "opening a can of worms' here. Most migrants in most countries do feel, rightly or wrongly, discriminated against. Same with ethnic or religious minorities who " belong here" I.e Christian Iraqis,Turkish Kurds, Oz aborigines, black americans, french of algerian descent etc. And in many/most cases they have a point. So why the need of a survey to confirm what everyone already knows? Very divisive tool imo.

Not saying nothing should be done but a survey is imo not the way to go. If you know something isnt right and J govt should know by now that yes discrimination does exist, then do something about it.

If migrants are paid less, have less opportunities, are occasionally told to 'go back to their country' chances are they dont like it, will never do and would very much like you J govt to do something about it.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Why are they surveying foreigners? They should be surveying Japanese. Ask any Japanese person how they feel about Chinese and Korean people and you'll get a hate speech reply.

17 ( +24 / -7 )

I have little doubt the survey will be done in a ridiculous manner with Japan praising questions to begin with. Like are Japanese polite on the train and at the store? Etc

6 ( +8 / -2 )

It's about time... I heard somebody say "gaijin" yesterday.

2 ( +9 / -7 )

But I am not going to hold my breath that the results will bring effective changes.

I agree. But at least its a start...

I doubt that I will see one of these survey's seeing as how I became naturalized here, but I would love to see JT have an open thread, that allows people who DO get a survey to share the information requested and maybe their responses as well.

Excellent idea. I'll second that.

But I don't agree with criminalizing hateful speech. For sure though, some that believe in 'freedom of speech' in their home countries, and rally against excessive political correctness, would absolutely condone zero freedom of speech in Japan when it comes to these types of things.

Freedom of speech does not include hate speech. And quite the contrary, many foreigners here are apologists for types of behavior they would never condone back home and chalk it up to the BS Japanese culture is unique argument.

By the way, I don't particularly see fault with anyone saying bad things about a Pyongyang-linked school

You don't have a problem with a racist group going to an elementary school and threatening the elementary school children with death??? really?? because that's EXACTLY what that insane group did.

Easy to do. Just go to the many drinking places that the average Japanese man can go to in a place like Yokosuka that are near the Navy base, but have the "No Foreigners" sign posted outside, or the touts that don't allow us gaijin to enter. Even when we may be fluent in Japanese, still no entry for foreigners

Excellent point.

Very much agree with mitoguitarman, "opening a can of worms' here. Most migrants in most countries do feel, rightly or wrongly, discriminated against. Same with ethnic or religious minorities who " belong here" I.e Christian Iraqis,Turkish Kurds, Oz aborigines, black americans, french of algerian descent etc. And in many/most cases they have a point. So why the need of a survey to confirm what everyone already knows?

Because until you acknowledge the problem openly, you can't do anything to fix it.

Why are they surveying foreigners? They should be surveying Japanese.

Foreigners are the ones that can tell you whether or not there is discrimination because THEY experience it. It is absurd to ask Japanese people about discrimination against foreigners. Imagine asking white people in the US if there is discrimination against black people.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

I'm reminded of the introductory quote, written by a university student, to the section on racism in the Lonely Planet China, ""There is no racism in China because we don't have any black people."

@AlyRustom: Indeed. Ask the minority groups about racism; not those in power.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Study concludes with: "Japanese people not racist, other races should just stop making Japanese people feel uncomfortable"

19 ( +20 / -1 )

Japanese racism is a very special case. The underlying feeling is one of insecurity. They express it as having "yellow skin" (?!), a flat face with a small nose, etc (when they are drunk). That results in an overreaction towards others, but changes the context to "ultra-nationalism" because race would just leave them on the side of Chinese and Koreans, their main target! Because nationalism is always a source of pride and encouraged, they can hardly ever fight this brand of racism. This is the complexity of the issue in Japan.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

How do you become one of the 18,500 ? I have plenty of stories.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

The Japanese government isn't going to like the results.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

I really wonder what the results of this survey will be. There is undeniably racial discrimination in Japan - anyone who has ever rented property has seen it first hand.

But, I wonder if the overall impression of foreigners will be as bad as many here seem to think. We on JT are only a single segment of the foreign population in Japan - the English speaking population. A good number of us are from first-world countries, and a good number of us are white, two demographics who have never experienced much racism first hand. There are many non-white, non-English speaking foreigners in Japan however, many from non-first-world countries. Is their opinion the same as ours?

9 ( +12 / -3 )

I've had acts that can be deemed racist done to me by Japanese people, but in most cases they're acts done in good will that have backfired or just plain "had no idea how to deal with the situation" syndrome. Other than a case or two, I almost never got the sense that the individual did what they did because he/she thought I was by nature inferior to them, or that the act was done out of hatred for gaijn.

On the other hand I see quite a bit of thinly veiled racism (sometimes blatant) by expats against Japanese people, with obvious connotations of superiority (usually cultural/moral but also physical) against the locals. These racist expats all share a really strong sense of entitlement.

7 ( +12 / -5 )

Does this need a ( Survey )? How Can I get a copy of the survey ?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

On the other hand I see quite a bit of thinly veiled racism (sometimes blatant) by expats against Japanese people, with obvious connotations of superiority (usually cultural/moral but also physical) against the locals. These racist expats all share a really strong sense of entitlement.

Very true.

Racism in neither direction is justifiable.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Hard to imagine racism in japan these days. So many foreigner living there. A friend of mine the other day uploaded the Halloween party he went to on instagram and there were so many foreigner out and about in the streets and in parties. there are so many foreigner who have japanese spouses and who were welcomed into society there. but there have been some people who haven't found the same welcome and were singled out due to certain reasons. and these individuals were polite, well-mannered, and didn't deliberately cause trouble, but were singled out and ijiwaruwed and attacked. the japanese definitely have their liking to a certain type of gaijin. makes you wonder if being welcomed is a good or bad thing? i guess its good if you want to stay there with a nice j-girl and find welcome, but for those who don't, it just makes you wonder what it is. some have said no matter how many 'international' parties they attended, they felt discriminated on. from what i have experienced and have seen, they really took a liking to the one foreigners who did crazy stuff with their hair or those who acted like children and joked around a lot.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

While looking into racism in Japan the study should look at the ekidens ... the team races where runners pass off the ribbon to the next runner in each leg. In the past foreign runners could run in their specialty distances. Recently, however, foreign runners are bunched in one rather short leg where they have to compete against each other no matter what their specialty distance is. I find this very racist as the organizers of these ekidens apparently don't want the foreign runners to "spoil" or "overshadow" performances by Japanese runners.

I say go back to the old system where foreign runners can run the distances they do best in ... not in one leg that is usually a shorter distance than they are prepared to run.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Freedom of speech does not include hate speech. And quite the contrary, many foreigners here are apologists for types of behavior they would never condone back home and chalk it up to the BS Japanese culture is unique argument.

"Hate speech" is, in my opinion, very difficult for the Japanese to define when it comes to how it is used against foreigners. The law that came about here is in, basically speaking, response to the Korean community in Japan, not all foreigners.

So, to many Japanese using the word "gaijin" this or "gaijin" that is not considered hate speech, but to SOME listeners it is very much so.

This survey may help with understanding what foreigners in Japan see as discrimination and hate speech, vs what the government believes is the same.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

"Ask any Japanese person how they feel about Chinese and Korean people and you'll get a hate speech reply."

I don't know about a hate speech reply, but in my experience too many of the replies have been downright ugly. I remember one racist idiot in an izakaya came close to violence when I pointed out that I've spent some time in China and his vicious words about Chinese people were over the top.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Racism is reality of the world we live in. Only the degree varies from nation to nation.

Has anyone seen a black goose swimming amongst the swans? Has anyone seen crows living in harmony with the pigeons? Has anyone seen a baby elephant, whose mom just died, being accepted by another herd of elephants?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

"Racism is reality of the world we live in. Only the degree varies from nation to nation."

Yes, but civilised people have made progress on this issue in case you hadn't noticed.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

"Yes, but civilised people have made progress on this issue in case you hadn't noticed."

The issue is only dormant. Doesn't mean that it has ceased to exist.

Once the recession, jobless rate, refugee crisis takes a hit on any nation you will notice this issue raising its ugly head again and again. Something we can learn from past history.

Sparks of racism are seen even in the "civilized world". I don't need to highlight instances here I guess.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

When I as a white guy do stupid stuff and no one calls me on it, is that too racism?

6 ( +8 / -2 )

I think I am the biggest racist here. I hate all races. 100m, 400m...even the marathons!

Joking aside, the outcome of this survey is obvious. Without understanding the Japaneses culture, all foreigners think that Japanese are racist. Isolation is not racism. A closed society is not racist. They don't beat you up, because you are different. It is like saying since honey bees don't let an elephant be in their hive, honey bees are racist. Many elements of Japanese society is not easy for foreigners to adopt. And just because foreigners can not adopt it, doesn't mean the Japanese need to change it. Japan value their culture, their way of life. And all those who can not accept this, will always cry of racism.

So, in advance, I am publishing the result of this survey: Japanese are racist...to all, as seen by the foreigners.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

Hate speech aside, here's a checklist of the average day to day stuff I come across:

-Not being able to rent an apartment, or paying an extra deposit -Not being able to rent parking spots from certain businesses (because you might suddenly leave the country) -Not being able to go into certain bars and restaurants (not as common in big cities, but happens from time to time) -Your co-workers occasionally suggest you sit on the "Gaijin side of the table" at meetings -You receive assignments that are better for "international workers" which may be less than ideal +People avoid sitting next to you on the train (actually kind of nice)

1st world problems, but still a little inconvenient to work here sometimes...

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Good. It should be done in big scale and made thoroughly known without any anti-Japan-flavored spices, reaching as far as up to Japanese (Young and old) who rarely come in contact with non-Japanese media and/or with foreigners themselves. This way, some of the issues deemed as racism might turn out to be some misunderstanding on either one side or both sides.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

I think banning any kind of speech is a slippery slope. Remember freedom of speech means you can't be arrested for speech. It doesn't mean your free of the consequences of shoot your mouth off to the wrong person.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

"You receive assignments that are better for "international workers" which may be less than ideal"

To be fair, I remember our Japanese translator ( Japanese to English and vice versa ) blowing her top after being handed a document written in German and being asked to translate it to Japanese. The boss seemed to think English and German were pretty much the same thing.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Not being able to rent an apartment, or paying an extra deposit -Not being able to rent parking spots from certain businesses (because you might suddenly leave the country)

This apartment, parking spots often comes as examples. Are these really racism? I doubt.

If these are typical, Racism in Japan is rather minor and easy to solve.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

Because nationalism is always a source of pride and encouraged, they can hardly ever fight this brand of racism. This is the complexity of the issue in Japan.

Nationalism doesn't automatically equate to racism. I believe a country has a right to define their borders language and culture. That doesn't mean that just because they have feelings toward their own, that they are racist. For example, America is made up of many different people of different races and creeds. But there is one set of "American cultural norms" or values on what it means to be an American. Because someone has those, doesn't make them a racist right off the bat. True there is prejudice in America and in every nation, but that doesn't automatically equate to nationalism.

Do the Japanese feel that they are unique and special in their own way, I imagine that most do. That is fine. Where the racism comes into play, is denying others opportunities or discriminating based on the racial/ethnic lineage of another.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

YeahRightOCT. 31, 2016 - 08:13AM JST

Can we volunteer to be surveyed?

This is only a first "major" survey, whatever the meaning of major is. Every year, MoJ issues a white paper on racism and discrimination.

If you have any complaint on racism, you can call MoJ phone number 0570―090911 as written in page 44 of the white paper this year. http://www.moj.go.jp/content/001150872.pdf

JimizoOCT. 31, 2016 - 10:24AM JST

I remember one racist idiot in an izakaya came close to violence when I pointed out that I've spent some time in China and his vicious words about Chinese people were over the top.

I wonder if you have enough Japanese skills to talk with some drunken Japanese person in Izakaya. Japanese people rarely talk to strangers in Izakaya. Even if they do, they do not talk about politics or sensitive, controversial things. Hate speech is usually defined as a speech that incites hate against certain people. Actually, your comment incited hate against Japanese in me. So, it is a hate speech.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

Has anyone seen a black goose swimming amongst the swans? Has anyone seen crows living in harmony with the pigeons? Has anyone seen a baby elephant, whose mom just died, being accepted by another herd of elephants?

Have you ever seen a swan using a cell phone? Have you seen a pigeon building a skyscraper? Have you seen an elephant adopt a child?

5 ( +8 / -3 )

If you have any complaint on racism, you can call MoJ phone number 0570―090911 as written in page 44 of the white paper this year. http://www.moj.go.jp/content/001150872.pdf

So, do you not see any problem with your link? Yes, kudos to the Japanese government for creating a site in Chinese and English, but as the entire report is sritten in Japanese and the no explanation of the link it is provided, it makes it kind of useless to foreigners unable to read Japanese.

I wonder if you have enough Japanese skills to talk with some drunken Japanese person in

Why would you doubt someone's Japanese ability? Does it take special skills to talk to drunken Japanese people. Sure didn't know I had special skills.

Japanese people rarely talk to strangers in Izakaya

Japanese is acnationality, not a species. I've been approached by many Japanese people at the local izakaya

Even if they do, they do not talk about politics or sensitive, controversial things.

Again, disagree. Generally, that I agree, but I've certainly many "controversial talks," and heard plenty of bigoted stuff while drinking in Japan. Recently, was at a bar with an American and Japanese friend. Japanese friend looks almost identical to (kim jong-il) was singing a Korean song and that set off two twin brothers. "i hate koreans...if you like Korea so much, go back. We don't need Koreans." Anecdotal? Sure, but that's just one.

I look forward to participating in this survey.

For starters, Japan should create laws to actually protect the rights of foreigners, like they were supposed to.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

I wonder if you have enough Japanese skills to talk with some drunken Japanese person in Izakaya. Japanese people rarely talk to strangers in Izakaya.

Say what? I've been talked to more by Japanese people in izakayas than in any other location. Give Japanese people some alcohol, and many of them lose their inhibitions about talking to foreigners. It's made for some great times.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

"I wonder if you have enough Japanese skills to talk with some drunken Japanese person in Izakaya. Japanese people rarely talk to strangers in izakaya"

Don't try to intimate that I'm lying, please. I agree it's rare but it happened. He was sitting close to my table and was inquisitive after he heard me speaking Japanese to my friend. It was all pretty harmless "where are you from?" stuff until the vicious anti-Chinese rant kicked in when I told him about my job which included visiting China and enjoying my time there. I wouldn't back down to the disgusting things he was saying about Chinese people and it got very heated.

If you don't think that anti-Chinese sentiment is widespread in Japan, I seriously doubt your sincerity. Many of the gaijin in Japan share this, by the way.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Survey don't mean anything, you can get them to say anything you want. From asked questions that don't actually cover anything to classifying X number of response invalid because of whatever reason.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Japanese people rarely talk to strangers in Izakaya. Even if they do, they do not talk about politics or sensitive, controversial things.

You need to hang out in more izakaya and be an obvious foreigner. As soon as a beer passes the lips of some people, they want to use their non-existent foreign language skills (myself included) and drunkenly talk to the closest foreigner.

As for not talking about sensitive controversial things, I've had to answer questions about my sex life, weight, religion, the politics of my country, why I can't eat natto, why foreigners (all of them, mind you, not just me) can't use chopsticks, and which breasts I like better American or Japanese. Some of those are controversial. Some "We Japanese" would NEVER ask another Japanese (unless very drunk or the boss). I've also had my hair fondled by oyaji to prove a point - but I don't know what the point was - gaijin (all of them) have hair? Soft hair? Curly hair? Hard hair?

When was the last time a foreigner came up to you in an izakaya, fondled your hair and asked you about your sex life? I wonder if you have enough English German Chinese Korean Spanish Tagalog Farsi etc skills to talk with some drunken foreigner person.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

We are going to have a big change the day Japanese people learn that "Japanese" is not a race and that they didn't evolve a longer intestine to digest the vegetables. People will open their minds the day English textbooks talk about things abroad and not about the wonderful things The Japanese people made in other countries.

Until then, none of these surveys will bring us a real result.

Nationality ≠ Race Ethnicity ≠ Race Religion ≠ Race

2 ( +4 / -2 )

This sounds fun. How do I partake?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Hate speech aside, Japan does not try to be a foreigner friendly country, even though a large percentage of the population are foreigners. A trip to your local city hall will easily demonstrate this. There is very little, if any help in any foreign language and those that do have foreign language help is usually done by volunteers. All the forms are in Japanese with no other languages supported. I got a letter from city hall last week about My Number and the only thing that was in a second language was, 'Important Notice' written in English on the envelope. The form was a check-box form that would have taken somebody ten minutes to translate and another ten minutes to create small translated guide to go with it, but no way. Not in Japan! To me, this is a kind of racism. Then, I could add the driver's license center and the car registration (shakken) center. I come from Australia and you can always get multiple language help at any city office. Maybe this is not racism, but it is not showing any support for foreign residents in Japan either, which could be considered racism.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Would be good to partake actually

2 ( +2 / -0 )

For those who complain about renting here, is this recent experience? Because when i was moving (in Tokyo, a couple of months ago), all the real estate agents were more than welcoming, and even when I asked if i should get my wife to make the application "in case they dont want foreigners", they responded with "that almost never happens these days, and even if they say something like that we tell them that we will do the vetting and not to worry about it."

Whether it happens behind doors, i guess i wont know, but i know it does happen in Australia - the real estate agent even told me that i had a better chance than the other applicants "because you are Australian".

As for the guarantor fee, i noticed many rental agencies now only accept guarantor companies, no more parents/bosses etc. It has now just become another rental fee to pay, regardless of where you come from.

But other than the rental stuff i agree there are racist things that happen to all of us here. I would think moreso if you were asian than if you are white, but it happens regardless.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Hate speech aside, Japan does not try to be a foreigner friendly country, even though a large percentage of the population are foreigners. A trip to your local city hall will easily demonstrate this. There is very little, if any help in any foreign language and those that do have foreign language help is usually done by volunteers. All the forms are in Japanese with no other languages supported.

I have to disagree fully. My local ward office has documents in multiple languages. My home country, while being multicultural does not offer the same, they only have documents in the local language. The fact that city halls here have volunteers for other languages shows that they are willing to be helpful. Again, not something I see in my home country.

My Number and the only thing that was in a second language was, 'Important Notice' written in English on the envelope. The form was a check-box form that would have taken somebody ten minutes to translate and another ten minutes to create small translated guide to go with it, but no way. Not in Japan! To me, this is a kind of racism.

Oh put it back in the deck. You came to Japan, it's up to you to learn Japanese, not to them to accommodate your lack of ability in the local language. Any extra they give you is a benefit.

For those who complain about renting here, is this recent experience?

Happened to me multiple times when searching for my current place, a year and a half ago.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

@Disillusioned Come on now. Not having something in your native language is, gasp, racism?

Secondly, two percent of the population are foreigners. Two. Not large. Two.

Hell, to me, it's kind of racist that proper cheese costs so much. Like an invisible foreigner-tax. And how about those chili peanuts. You have to order them online!!! Pretty racist.

Come on.... Let's just not do this....

7 ( +8 / -1 )

You need to hang out in more izakaya and be an obvious foreigner. As soon as a beer passes the lips of some people, they want to use their non-existent foreign language skills (myself included) and drunkenly talk to the closest foreigner.

Sounds bad luck to you. but he seems just a troublesome drankard, poor old oyaji who rarely has balls to use his non-existent language skills. If you feel uncomfortable, just do as you usually do anywhere. don't have to be too nice

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Compare this with how many US "stars" debase themselves... Japan still seems stuck in 1962. Hope she remains safe nonetheless, from the loose nuts out there.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Hate speech" is, in my opinion, very difficult for the Japanese to define when it comes to how it is used against foreigners. The law that came about here is in, basically speaking, response to the Korean community in Japan, not all foreigners.

True. Which is why it needs to be discussed and defined.

So, to many Japanese using the word "gaijin" this or "gaijin" that is not considered hate speech, but to SOME listeners it is very much so.

When I first came here years back to teach english, I remember an older British man getting sacked for greeting his students with "Hello Chaps". (They thought he was saying something else.) Also if I used that same word here, my comment would be deleted as vulgar, yet Gaijin is very much accepted. Its a case of double standards, which is what I find Japan to be a nation full of. Its ok if they do it to us but not ok if we do it to them.

This survey may help with understanding what foreigners in Japan see as discrimination and hate speech, vs what the government believes is the same.

That would depend on how much Japan will allow foreign input into it. If this is going to be used to dictate policy, I doubt that we will have much input in anything.. but that's my opinion.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Like I said above, the results of this survey should be well known to every hole and corner of the society to educate Japanese people more about how foreigners feel uncomfortable and discriminated in Japan. Whether Japanese people object or accept the results is another issue.

Quite a few Japanese still think and hence un-intentionally use gaijin as just abbreviated term of Gaikokujin

Anti-Chinese, Anti-Korean feelings are completely different issue from so-called racism

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

I think that one problem some foreigners living in Japan have is recognizing the difference between racism and discrimination.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Is refusing to service Chinese because they are generally dirty and lack good manners racist or discrimination? Is saying that Chinese are generally dirty and ill mannered racist or discrimination? At what point does it go from simply stating facts, to discrimination or racism?

2 ( +6 / -4 )

At what point does it go from simply stating facts, to discrimination or racism?

When you start applying stereotypes about a group to an individual that you know nothing about, and treat them according to what you believe the group they belong to may be like, rather than waiting to find out the type of person they actually are.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I hope they also ask whether we have seen other foreigners behaving inconsiderately or condescendingly towards Japanese. Much of the dislike of foreigners by Japanese is due to an inability of foreigners to perceive Japanese sensibilities, or to think they matter.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

They should include bi-racial and non-Japanese schoolkids aged 6-18 in the study; they're at least as likely to face discrimination as anyone else, andthe least likely to be able to do anything to address it.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Give speaker trucks inkjet printers so they can stand in the rain and hand out their hate crime pamphlets to nobody who is interested, instead of driving around in their bullet proof trucks scaring birds and old ladies.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I think all foreigners in all countries experience racism, or not, in a very different way. A 55yo non Caucasian, average looking male will struggle more in most countries, including Japan, than say a 35yo pleasant looking caucasian female. Same for 100% gaijin couples vs mixed gaijin/J couples, much easier for the latter. Add a different religion, look, many kgs etc and it will get even harder.

Never saw or felt any blatant racism directed towards me when i was/am in Japan. Scepticism, awkwardness and discomfort when dealing with foreigners, fear of the unknown etc yes, but I understood where they were coming from.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

When you start applying stereotypes about a group to an individual that you know nothing about, and treat them according to what you believe the group they belong to may be like, rather than waiting to find out the type of person they actually are.

So if I operate a b&b and I keep letting Chinese stay and have to clean up after them in ways I shouldn't have to, I should expect that the next Chinese person who comes won't do the same thing, even though it has happened again and again?

Isn't that the definition of insanity? Are you suggesting that I am insane? Or just racist?

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Have you ever seen a swan using a cell phone? Have you seen a pigeon building a skyscraper? Have you seen an elephant adopt a child? Not sure whats your point with the examples above.

My point via examples initially is that racism exists everywhere. Its been there in the wild and will be there in our society forever. It is who we are and very much part of our instinct.

Many people here seem to confuse between racism and discrimination though.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Well, well, well, after all these years the government finally gets around to doing something.

Better than doing nothing. What other developed countries have issued similar surveys among foreign residents?

So if I operate a b&b and I keep letting Chinese stay and have to clean up after them in ways I shouldn't have to, I should expect that the next Chinese person who comes won't do the same thing, even though it has happened again and again?

Kind of like having to deal with gaijin drama and offensive behavior when they dont get their way? When this pattern of behavior happens over and over, should the Japanese business owner expect the same with the next gaijin?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

If you know Japanese culture, you know that they behave differently among them, assuming a gaigokujin cannot be able to react the proper way. Like famous commentator here Yubaru (I hope please you don't mind taking you as example), even if you know nearly everything like a Japanese and have the Japanese nationality, you are not considered Japanese-able for understanding. Hence astonishment if you are Japanese language fluent, chopstick able, kimigayo singing able...but any little default to any Japanese etiquette makes you anyway a gaijin forever. Black or white. Grey does not exist, yet. I love my Japanese wife but I am still a full foreign guy to her eyes without consideration of my experience and knowledge acquired about that country and its wonderful people.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

So if I operate a b&b and I keep letting Chinese stay and have to clean up after them in ways I shouldn't have to, I should expect that the next Chinese person who comes won't do the same thing, even though it has happened again and again?

It's discriminatory. Some people may argue that it's justified, but it doesn't change the fact that it's discriminatory.

My point via examples initially is that racism exists everywhere. Its been there in the wild and will be there in our society forever.

My point was that animals live outdoors, and have never been able to overcome their limitations as individuals or small groups. We are humans, who have created huge megastructures, been to the moon, found ways to communicate nearly instantaneously with people on the other side of the planet. Saying we can't change because some animals do something that we do is ridiculous, we definitely have the power to change to become more than animals, and more than what we are now.

even if you know nearly everything like a Japanese and have the Japanese nationality, you are not considered Japanese-able for understanding. Hence astonishment if you are Japanese language fluent, chopstick able, kimigayo singing able...but any little default to any Japanese etiquette makes you anyway a gaijin forever. Black or white. Grey does not exist, yet.

Yes, you are either Japanese ethnicity, or not. The only place grey exists in that is for kids who are half Japanese.

But if you are white, and expect to be ethnically Japanese, it will never happen. Ever.

Now if you are trying to say there is no grey within their society, then you are incorrect. There is plenty of grey. Foreigners have become politicians, some foreigners run companies. We can become part of groups, and be part of that in-group whereas other Japanese people will be the outgroup.

Those of us who are not ethnically Japanese will never be ethnically Japanese. But don't equate that to meaning we can never have any kind of acceptance.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

It's discriminatory. Some people may argue that it's justified, but it doesn't change the fact that it's discriminatory.

I agree. I too think it's discrimation. And I will defend my right to discriminate - online. I might stop someone from using my b&b, but you'll never hear me actually SAY the real reason. I hardly need the real-world trouble that comes with justified discrimination.

Kind of like having to deal with gaijin drama and offensive behavior when they dont get their way? When this pattern of behavior happens over and over, should the Japanese business owner expect the same with the next gaijin?

You get it! Yes, they should.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

So if I operate a b&b and I keep letting Chinese stay and have to clean up after them in ways I shouldn't have to, I should expect that the next Chinese person who comes won't do the same thing, even though it has happened again and again?

Reminds me of the onwer of a small Japanese restaurant in Tsushima interviewed by TV. Too much troublems by Korean tourists not only things like mentioned above, they sometimes got too drunk and violent, broke dishes and chairs, and often leaving without paying bill. The owner finally prohibits Koreans to enter and decided to serve only for Japanese to have peaceful life. Korean TV reporter should pay visit and make apology to him rather than make him apology.

So how bad are Japanese racism and/or discrimination, generally speaking? as compard to the stuff spewed by some posters here in JT? Are those more frank and open?

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

@DieRealityCheck: reaching as far as up to Japanese (Young and old) who rarely come in contact with non-Japanese media and/or with foreigners themselves. This way, some of the issues deemed as racism might turn out to be some misunderstanding on either one side or both sides.

Quite often this is the case but as F4HA604 mentioned above, the self-entitled touchy expats are never too quick to call it “racism.”

@roughneck: Joking aside, the outcome of this survey is obvious. Without understanding the Japaneses culture, all foreigners think that Japanese are racist. Isolation is not racism. A closed society is not racist. They don't beat you up, because you are different. (…) Many elements of Japanese society is not easy for foreigners to adopt. And just because foreigners can not adopt it, doesn't mean the Japanese need to change it. Japan value their culture, their way of life. And all those who can not accept this, will always cry of racism.

Haha. I totally agree with you. The foreigners who cry “racism” are not very keen on trying to understand the local culture and the reasons for the frustration of many Japanese when they have to speak/counteract with foreigners. The easiest way is to blame the locals and hint that in this godforsaken land nothing ever changes. It is also quite often the case that the Japanese are aware that parts of their culture are difficult to be accepted by people of different cultural background yet they (the Japanese) do not ridicule the foreigners who are so clumsy at “reading the air.” I can go on and on but I know that there will always be people who will try to establish their imaginary superiority by ridiculing the local people or writing derogatory comments about their way of life, customs, traditions, etc.

@takeda: For starters, Japan should create laws to actually protect the rights of foreigners, like they were supposed to.

But then somebody might say that creating laws only for foreigners is racist because ….. (feel free to complete the sentence as you see fit – I am sure you can find a thousand ways to prove why such a law would be racist.)

@Phil: I hope they also ask whether we have seen other foreigners behaving inconsiderately or condescendingly towards Japanese. Much of the dislike of foreigners by Japanese is due to an inability of foreigners to perceive Japanese sensibilities, or to think they matter.

This.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

"Much of the dislike of foreigners by Japanese is due to an inability of foreigners to perceive Japanese sensibilities, or to think they matter."

In my experience, the majority of people who dislike foreigners tend to be people who don't know any foreigners and have had little or no interaction with them.

An old coworker of mine who returned home after years living here told me not to bother learning the language if my purpose was just to work here. He said the only Japanese people worth bothering with are used to foreigners and speak English. I don't fully agree with that and I did bother learning it, but there's more than a kernel of truth in what he said when I look at all my close Japanese friends.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Quite a few Japanese still think and hence un-intentionally use gaijin as just abbreviated term of Gaikokujin

Would those same Japanese accept it when a foreigner uses an abbreviated term of Japanese to describe them? Like I mentioned above, one british guy got sacked, and he wasn't EVEN using that term. So no. There is no excuse for use of that term. And if its so innocent, why don't they use it on TV?

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

I hope they also ask whether we have seen other foreigners behaving inconsiderately or condescendingly towards Japanese. Much of the dislike of foreigners by Japanese is due to an inability of foreigners to perceive Japanese sensibilities, or to think they matter.

That's something I've seen when I travel to Japan, the way some foreign people treat the locals Can you imagine the reaction if some Japanese people started dicking about on trains, making faces at kids and laughing at cultural displays? I've seen that a fair bit. Okay, it doesn't excuse the racism that some posters have witnessed or experienced, but can you imagine the impression these people leave on the locals?

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Should be interesting. I hope they are honest about the results. I've been asked if I've suffered racism and when I responded that I have I was literally told in a couple of cases, after being asked for my opinion, that "we don't need your opinion".

I can say that racism here is not usually the sort of outgoing, and definitely not often physical, racism you can experience elsewhere, but it exists, and it is deep, deep-rooted.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

@jonathan: I love my Japanese wife but I am still a full foreign guy to her eyes without consideration of my experience and knowledge acquired about that country and its wonderful people.

And what is wrong with that? You will never be an ethnic Japanese. Your "foreign" genes cannot be changed, not in your lifetime? If anything, knowing the language and culture but still being a foreigner gives you the advantage of being accepted while your Japanese relatives and friends do not burden you with their high expectations of you to be exactly like them. I think this is called tolerance, not discrimination, not racism.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Lawmakers need to define the borderline between freedom of speech and hate speech, and throw the law in the book for justice sake.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Quite a number of racist apologists here. Foreigners trying to be more Japanese than the Japanese.

I have numerous examples of discrimination I have experienced because I am not Japanese, as well as incidents of out right racism, It exists, it happens and pretending it's all down to sensitivity on the part of the victim or some kind of cultural misunderstanding is naive and disingenuous.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

And what is wrong with that? You will never be an ethnic Japanese. Your "foreign" genes cannot be changed, not in your lifetime? If anything, knowing the language and culture but still being a foreigner gives you the advantage of being accepted while your Japanese relatives and friends do not burden you with their high expectations of you to be exactly like them.

That's what I love about living here!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

JaneM: "I think this is called tolerance, not discrimination, not racism."

Depends. Can you vote, even with a permanent visa, and the fact that you pay taxes? No. Even if that somehow could be called "tolerance", how is it accepting? I mean, people who MAY have dual nationality are receiving all sorts of flak in the last little while as Japan goes full-gear into a retreat to the days of old. There are indeed good points, and I agree that for the most part people are tolerant, but being viewed as not 100% Yamato Japanese and 'never will be' is just as often used for bad as good. I bet you cannot deny there is exclusion beyond the example of voting I gave.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

What is particularly reprehensible about racism in Japan is that most of it is against Koreans whose families may have not only been there for generations but may have come over at a time when Japan was "administering" (which I take it means had militarily taken over) Korea. Surely also any resident even of late will be there with government permission. Personally I find it hard to tell the difference between them, so I don't see what the fuss is about.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

MyhumbletakeOCT. 31, 2016 - 04:55PM JST

Lawmakers need to define the borderline between freedom of speech and hate speech, and throw the law in the book for justice sake.

The definition in the new law enacted in this June is as follows.

本邦外出身者に対する不当な差別的言動の解消に向けた取組の推進に関する法律

第2条  この法律において「本邦外出身者に対する不当な差別的言動」とは、専ら本邦の域外にある国若しくは地域の出身である者又はその子孫であって適法に居住するもの(以下この条において「本邦外出身者」という。)に対する差別的意識を助長し又は誘発する目的で公然とその生命、身体、自由、名誉若しくは財産に危害を加える旨を告知し又は本邦外出身者を著しく侮蔑するなど、本邦の域外にある国又は地域の出身であることを理由として、本邦外出身者を地域社会から排除することを煽動する不当な差別的言動をいう。

Article 2. In this law, "inappropriate discriminatory speech against people whose origin is outside of Japan" is defined as an inappropriate discriminatory speech that instigates others to exclude people

whose origin is a country or an area that is outside of Japan, or the descendants of such people, and

who live in Japan legally,

(hereafter called "people whose origin is outside of Japan")

from local community based on the fact that their origin is outside of Japan,

by such means as openly informing them to harm their life, body, freedom, honor, or valuables, or

by severely insulting them

with an intention of aggravating or inducing discrimination.

The law says the people have the obligation to realize a society that is free from "inappropriate discriminatory speech against people whose origin is outside of Japan", but does not incriminate such speech.

I am against hate speech regulation, because it is simply impossible to draw a line between hate speech and free speech. In addition, threatening and insulting are punishable crimes already.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

CH3CHO: "I am against hate speech regulation, because it is simply impossible to draw a line between hate speech and free speech."

No, not at all. But I'm not really surprised you can't see the difference. Many Japanese can't, and that's a big part of the problem and why I said I hope they take the survey seriously and don't just ultimately say, "Hai hai, gaijin desukara ne."

You honestly can't see any problem with screaming death threats at children who were born and raised here but whose parents may be ethnic Korean? You think that's 'free speech'?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Quite a few Japanese still think and hence un-intentionally use gaijin as just abbreviated term of Gaikokujin

Sorry but from experience there is not one Japanese person that I know that has ever used the term gaijin as an abbreviated form of gaikokujin, never. Believe it or not the term gaikokujin is relatively new, Meiji era, and until schools start teaching the correct term and stop students from using gajin, along with society as well, better get used to hearing both for a while, like a few generations.

Go look up where gaijin was first used and you'll see that Japanese used the word themselves about themselves when talking about someone from a different area,gaijin.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I call my self Gaijin as thats what i am, the p.c police here wont like it though. As for the survey i doubt it will make or change anything, just window dressing. Like the millions of reports written here that never get read. Dont want to sound so negative but change needs to come from education and here it is more like indoctrination, the Us and Them thing is one of the corner stones of Japanese society. Hence i call myself a gaijin as thats what i am and always will be.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Hence i call myself a gaijin as thats what i am and always will be.

Believe me or not, but I do understand what you are saying here. I used to be bugged no end by being called that, but realized that the people using the word werent using it out of a sense of being discriminatory or racist, just out of ignorance that really isnt their fault.

Even being a citizen I still get called gaijin, and it no longer bugs me, as I can not change 120,000,000 plus people, only the ones around me and they just call me by by name.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I don't think it's racism as much as an ignorance from being a isolationist nation. This has led to a group and family security being more important than empathy and friendliness toward the unknown. They don't know what is outside their realm, and they don't want to, even among themselves to a large extent. That's why things seem very impersonal and people are very protective and secretive within Japan.

With the increase of foreigners, which is very recent in the scheme of history, it just added to the idea of people outside their own circle. Not as in their own groups and families, but as a nationalistic whole. The Japanese try to be fair, but it really isn't to outsiders because they always find the final thing they look for: 'yappari, gaijin da'.

It isn't racism and I don't take it to be. The Japanese limit themselves by protectionist ideals and non transparent behavior stemming from their island isolationist customs. It is natural to them, and I don't believe their discrimination is from anything truly racist, it's from just being different from their familiarity, and a belief they don't have to change their views because within their own society, they have a lot of bigotry, bullying and non adaptability, while trying to be accommodating at the same time. They're friendly as a custom, but within their private feelings, they aren't necessarily. When they deal with foreigners, that idea gets exacerbated because most societies are more transparent in their feelings and emotions, and demand greater clarity.

Simply, the Japanese have some emotional voids that are stifled by years of customs. They cannot express themselves clearly, and when foreigners question their grey areas, they have no answers because they've lived with them so long, it is second nature, and not really understandable to foreigners on a deep level. When the yes/no response comes up from foreigners, Japanese inevitably say, 'yappari gaijin', and ultimately, that saying eventually pops up when describing all foreigners, bar none.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Aly

Would those same Japanese accept it when a foreigner uses an abbreviated term of Japanese to describe them? Like I mentioned above, one british guy got sacked, and he wasn't EVEN using that term. So no. There is no excuse for use of that term. And if its so innocent, why don't they use it on TV?

More or less expected stereotyped respponse. But no , It is not the same at all . Come on. Be honest. Foreigners, espeacially white english speakers know how bad that abbreviation sounds to Japanese. That british guy didn't use exact term as he knew it did he.

And if its so innocent, why don't they use it on TV?

Innocent is not an appropriate adjective. It's not made well known yet especially to the people described for example, as a drunk oyaji at Izakaya who has zero language skills or chances to intereact with foreigners.

Which usually comes first? TV ceased to use particula specific expression as banned word s on the air or ordinary people eduacted not use them.

TV or Radio do not tell you Don't use the word warning as obviously as they do for earthquakes or Tunami warnings.

Seems quite a few posters here used to be or still are english teachers here. It's partly their faults not to emphasize Gaijin is darogatory

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

I still can't get over the comment about some poor old British teacher being sacked for greeting his students with "Hello Chaps".

I mean, really? I have to assume that he tried to explain what he'd said to his employer but to still be sacked suggests there's more to this story than we're being told.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Now this is funny, I would hate to see the results, because they will not look good!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

'Have you ever seen a swan using a cell phone? Have you seen a pigeon building a skyscraper? Have you seen an elephant adopt a child?'

@Strangerland

Good answer. Unfortunately we have yet to see humanity build a sustainable or decent level of peace.

They should make more places like American MURA in Osaka or places in Robbongi that are foreign friendly. I personally wouldn't mind going to places as such and not venture to the 'no gaijin' places and it wouldn't bother me, if the places weren't bombarded with drugs, and hoodlums, though. but that is all you ever found in such places in roppoingi and MURA. i have always wanted to meet some decent people and not trashiness. I remember when I was in japan all people ver asked me was 'do you have a gun?' 'America is dangerous, desho??' Minna gun aru daiyo, ne?' How has America and outside nations of that Island succumbed to that? Gone are the days that foreigner are looked at as doing things great. Maybe it is going into their favour and picture they want to paint for other things, mostly political agendas?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Socrates speaks again! He is never wrong he knows everything, maybe he should have been a philosopher!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Good answer. Unfortunately we have yet to see humanity build a sustainable or decent level of peace.

Give it time. I have hope.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The questions will include whether the respondents have experienced or seen racial discrimination in everyday life or workplace, and what action they want the government to take to eliminate discrimination, it added.

I lived in kansai for nearly a decade. I can count on my left hand the number of times I got crap just because I am a gaijin. I remember brushing up against a well-dressed middle aged women in a department store, and she literally jumped back and shook with disgust. That was interesting.

Another time while out on a pub craw in minami Osaka, one of those barkers for a strip club -- y'know, the old guy with the stupid sign -- tried to have a go at my date:

"Why you with that f&*^g guy? [sono yaroh] "What kind of girl are you anyway? If you were my daughter.."

She shut him down. Pretty darn fast. I should thank that racist dip for giving that gal the chance to show me the true cast of her character. BTW, that gal is my wife.

Aside from a few encounters like that, My experience with racism was largely positive along the lines how Dave Spector described it:

"...he described his work as "[d]oing things like the lowest Bozo, circus kind of stuff. But it doesn't bother me at all. A lot of times the foreigners on TV, models and what-not, are compared to pandas. They use that term here — pandas — because they're cuddly, you can go and have fun with them, and throw a marshmallow and that's about it. And you don't get involved any more deeper than that. But...since I'm making half a million dollars a year, I'm very happy to be a panda."

As was I. I could have even settled down as a panda but for one thing:

The kids.

I would never want my kids to have to go through that kind of crap while growing up.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Of course there is racism here as there is all over the world. I'm a white English speaking male from a Japanese ally. I have never had my social liberties denied and I've never felt threatened. I have a good life here. However, I don't know if the same exists for other people who are not white or don't speak English. As for me, I don't see being called gaijin, assumptions about my Japanese ability or not being allowed to vote as racist. Some say that the racism is thinly veiled. That kind of comment says more about the individual's sensibilities than it does about any racism that may be present.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

More or less expected stereotyped respponse. But no , It is not the same at all . Come on. Be honest. Foreigners, espeacially white english speakers know how bad that abbreviation sounds to Japanese.

Well if it sounds so bad to Japanese why do they still continue to use the word gaijin. Be honest, this is about we can call you names but you can't do the same.

Innocent is not an appropriate adjective. It's not made well known yet especially to the people described for example, as a drunk oyaji at Izakaya who has zero language skills or chances to intereact with foreigners.

That's no excuse.

Which usually comes first? TV ceased to use particula specific expression as banned word s on the air or ordinary people eduacted not use them. TV or Radio do not tell you Don't use the word warning as obviously as they do for earthquakes or Tunami warnings.

Typical apologist BS

Seems quite a few posters here used to be or still are english teachers here. It's partly their faults not to emphasize Gaijin is derogatory

Who told you that? All foreigners I know do. And why should we have to? Why don't the Japanese know this themselves seeing how they don't want to be called "chaps"

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

My comment should have read sensitivities and not sensibilities.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Strangerland: "My point was that animals live outdoors, and have never been able to overcome their limitations as individuals or small groups. We are humans, who have created huge megastructures, been to the moon, found ways to communicate nearly instantaneously with people on the other side of the planet. Saying we can't change because some animals do something that we do is ridiculous, we definitely have the power to change to become more than animals, and more than what we are now."

The problem of racism has been there for last thousands of years and you seriously hope that it will change for better in future. I admire your optimism and hallucination.

Don't tell me that building megastructures, going to the moon, advances in communication are all steps towards eliminating racism. Give me a break! Think before you fire your comments like a loose cannon here. Good luck!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The problem of racism has been there for last thousands of years and you seriously hope that it will change for better in future.

Wait, are you trying to say that we as a species haven't progressed even one bit in regards to racism in the past few thousand years, give me a break. How many of us here are married to Japanese people? Do you think we could have been able to do that in the past?

We've made significant progress towards eliminating racism. We still have a long way to go, but the direction we are moving is clear.

Don't tell me that building megastructures, going to the moon, advances in communication are all steps towards eliminating racism.

Why would I? What do those things have to do with eliminating racism?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@smithinjapan

Depends. Can you vote, even with a permanent visa, and the fact that you pay taxes? No

Care to name any first world countries where you are allowed to vote without citizenship? Thats not racism, thats just normal country laws.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Care to name any first world countries where you are allowed to vote without citizenship?

Most do allow you to vote in municipal elections if they ask you to pay municipal taxes. The UK is one example.

Thats not racism, thats just normal country laws.

Most normal countries don't make you revoke your citizenship to naturalize.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Aly

Hey. Stop BS anybody and his reply if you care how people feel offended by particular derogatory words.

Typical apologist BS

The Seventy dirty words (banned words) are not law, but are independently restrained at their sole discretion. Besides, some words are on the list not because they were discriminately but simply because they are vague and unclear. How do ordinary people know all of those? I wonder how many of you JT posters knew Half is one of those words when you were discussing topics about dual nationality a week ago?

Well if it sounds so bad to Japanese why do they still continue to use the word gaijin. Be honest, this is about we can call you names but you can't do the same.

All I said was it’s been not yet well known to every hole and corner of the society. What’s wrong with that? Do you read Japanese? This was originally for Yubaru (and mods deleted soon after) bur just go and read them up.

https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%A4%96%E5%9B%BD%E4%BA%BA

外国人(がいこくじん、alien=#英訳を参照)とは、居住または滞在している国家の国籍または市民権を有しない者のこと。外国人を省略した外人 (がいじん、gaijin) という呼称もある

Check the Foot note 1) and 2)

^ 「外人は、外国人を略した俗語」(類語研究会『似た言葉使い分け辞典』、創拓社出版、1991年、652 ページ より引用)

^ 「外人墓地」や「外人部隊」など公的な名称としても使われてる。

Also

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E5%A4%96%E4%BA%BA

outsider; an estranged, unfamiliar person  [quotations ▼] an abbreviation for 外国人; a person from a foreign country; an alien, a foreign national; a person who is not Japanese
-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Aly RustomNOV. 01, 2016 - 07:25AM JST

Why don't the Japanese know this themselves seeing how they don't want to be called "chaps"

It is only you who say Japanese do not want to be called "chaps". I have never heard of such things from someone other than you.

I think you do not know because you are new to Japan, but distinction between "ch" and "j" sounds is a mine field of discrimination in Japan and Korea. Japanese can distinguish "ch" and "j" whereas Koreans generally cannot, because both "ch" and "j" are written as ㅈ in Korean and are not distinguished in pronunciation. So, when a Japanese becomes very mean and ridicules Koreans, he ridicules Koreans' pronunciation by exchanging ch and j.

But you say Japanese get angry because of "chaps"? I do not believe it.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I remember brushing up against a well-dressed middle aged women in a department store, and she literally jumped back and shook with disgust. That was interesting.

You should shower more often. ;-)

I would never want my kids to have to go through that kind of crap while growing up.

I think kids have it easier. Growing up, they learn both cultures and know how to navigate all the bs.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I have a better idea than TV banned words list.

All the Gaikokujinposters here, when given chances to respond to this survey, don't forget to stress that Gaijin is offensive above anything, which would surely go in the air quickly.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Readers, the "gaijin vs "gaikokujin" debate will not be settled on this thread, so this ends discussion on this point.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Besides, some words are on the list not because they were discriminately but simply because they are vague and unclear.

Then just don't use them.

All I said was it’s been not yet well known to every hole and corner of the society. What’s wrong with that?

Well, the other word, which got the elder teacher fired is. When you feel that its ok to use gaijin but are aware of the sensitivies of the other word, its a double standard and it is racist.

I wonder how many of you JT posters knew Half is one of those words when you were discussing topics about dual nationality a week ago?

I did. And I find that word also disgusting as well as backward.

It is only you who say Japanese do not want to be called "chaps". I have never heard of such things from someone other than you.

So do you mind if I call you a "chap"? Ok by you? No it is not only me.

I think you do not know because you are new to Japan,

I am not new to Japan. I have been living here since before 9/11. When it happened, I was already here watching it on the news. Please don't make comments when you don't know what you are talking about.

but distinction between "ch" and "j" sounds is a mine field of discrimination in Japan and Korea. Japanese can distinguish "ch" and "j" whereas Koreans generally cannot, because both "ch" and "j" are written as ㅈ in Korean and are not distinguished in pronunciation. So, when a Japanese becomes very mean and ridicules Koreans, he ridicules Koreans' pronunciation by exchanging ch and j.

First of all, 日本語大丈夫です。説明しなくてもいいですよ。Second, this story happened. In front of my eyes. deal with it.

But you say Japanese get angry because of "chaps"? I do not believe it.

I don't care.

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I wonder what brainless new "etiquette" - and public information posters - the findings will spawn.

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Yes, JCitizen Racism, and Xenophobia, are alive and well in JLand.

When 2nd, 3rd, or even 4th generation Jland born Chinese or Koreans do not have the same rights or opportunities as someone who can trace their ancestry back over 1000 years, that is racism.

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@smithinjapan: Can you vote, even with a permanent visa, and the fact that you pay taxes? No. Even if that somehow could be called "tolerance", how is it accepting?

Smith, being allowed to vote or not has nothing to do with racism. If you so much want to have your voice heard naturalize, become a Japanese citizen and vote. Once you have your Japanese passport, your ethnic background will be irrelevant to your right to vote. I may be ignorant but I have not heard of a country which allows un-naturalized permanent residents to vote in national elections.

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Peter QinghaiNOV. 01, 2016 - 11:39AM JST

When 2nd, 3rd, or even 4th generation Jland born Chinese or Koreans do not have the same rights or opportunities as someone who can trace their ancestry back over 1000 years, that is racism.

Here comes the common misunderstanding by Americans. By showing the intention to be a Japanese citizen, he/she can naturalize into Japan. with all the rights of a Japanese citizen even with the right to be appointed as the Prime Minister of Japan. Actually, many Koreans refuse to naturalize because they do not want to be Japanese.

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Actually many Koreans refuse to naturalize because they do not want to change their birth-given Korean names for "acceptable" Japanese names.

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@Yubaru just being realistic and accepting to colloquial Japanese nothing more.

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Many years ago I was at a friends home, an American husband and Japanese wife. While the husband was out of the room the wife told me a story about some Japanese acquaintances that had shown her husband and her around a local shrine. She said that behind her husbands back, the Japanese had been complaining about having to guide this stupid gaijin around. She said to me, "The reality is, that Japanese don't consider foreigners human" I was shocked to hear that, but in a way relieved because it explained a lot of things.

After that dinner I went home and saw my Japanese girlfriend and told her that story. Her response, "Oh yeah, that's true." I was dumbfounded because I had said similar things to her many times and she had always denied it. But when it came from a Japanese persons mouth, she agreed immediately. I have told this story many times over the years. Universally the response from Japanese has been yes it is true. The response from foreigners has been denial or to say I am racist. If you want to do an experiment, tell one Japanese person that you heard that Japanese don't think foreigners are human. Tell them you heard it from a Japanese friend. See how they respond.

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@HaileyG

I heard the same thing. My ex-girlfriend from a looong time ago told me that the japanese (mainly during the ww2 era) always looked at foreigner as slaves for them. mere entertainers and people who made things for their enjoyment in this world. Has anyone else ever heard that? Honest to God true story. I actually heard that from several japanese when I lived there. I seriously have always thought that kind of mindset was dangerous.

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Universally the response from Japanese has been yes it is true. The response from foreigners has been denial

Put me in the denial camp. Someone else tried to tell me that a few years back, I asked around, and didn't find anyone who said that.

I just asked my wife though, as I never asked her back in the day. She said 大人は人間と思ってる.

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billyhelper_33: @HaileyG - I heard the same thing. My ex-girlfriend from a looong time ago told me that the japanese (mainly during the ww2 era) always looked at foreigner as slaves for them. mere entertainers and people who made things for their enjoyment in this world.

Having thrown off the feudal system, I guess they gradually replaced the ex-serfs with non-Japanese, and everybody (everybody Japanese) got used to the system.

Check the graph of Korean residents in Japan, 1910-2015 (under the right-hand sidebar at the wikipedia article):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koreans_in_Japan

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borschtNOV. 01, 2016 - 08:40PM JST

Actually many Koreans refuse to naturalize because they do not want to change their birth-given Korean names for "acceptable" Japanese names.

Here comes another misunderstanding. They do not need to change their names. There are many actual examples of naturalized Japanese whose origin is Korea and kept their names.

Only shortcoming is that there are sounds that do not exist in Japanese. Japanese language has 5 vowels, whereas Korean language has 8 vowels. They have 2 kinds of E, 2 kinds of I and 2 kinds of O. Some consonants such as ㅈ, ㅉ and ㅊ are indistinguishable in Japanese language (as well as in English). If the corresponding sound does not exist in Japanese phonetics, the nearest sound must be adopted. Other than that, they do not need to change their names in naturalizing, like changing Miguel into Michael.

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Here comes another misunderstanding. They do not need to change their names. There are many actual examples of naturalized Japanese whose origin is Korea and kept their names.

I know an ethnic korean, 3rd or 4th generation in Japan, but still holding a Korean passport, who has a Japanese and a Korean name. I don't know exactly how it works though, it may be the same sort of thing as with my kids where they are registered under one name in my home country, and another in Japan.

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HaileGNOV. 02, 2016 - 02:48AM JST

"The reality is, that Japanese don't consider foreigners human"

Universally the response from Japanese has been yes it is true.

I have been living in japan for more than 50 years. I have never ever heard such a statement. And I can easily find hundreds of Japanese who say no it is not true.

StrangerlandNOV. 02, 2016 - 10:49AM JST

I know an ethnic korean, 3rd or 4th generation in Japan, but still holding a Korean passport, who has a Japanese and a Korean name

The unofficial Japanese-sounding name is called 通称名 tsushoumei, (alias, nickname). A foreign resident can register tsushoumei at municipal government.

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I have been living in japan for more than 50 years. I have never ever heard such a statement. And I can easily find hundreds of Japanese who say no it is not true.

I I have been living here for 30 years and every Japanese I told this story to has said it was true. If I asked if they thought foreigners were sub-human ...they would say no of course not. But when I say my Japanese friend said it, they all acknowledge it is true. The fact that a Japanese admitted to it gives them an out, to admit it is indeed true. Ironically it is always non-Japanese who deny it. I think they can't accept the idea that their friends, wives etc. would think such a thing. I have had students say in class, in front of international students, that Japanese don't like foreigners. The Japanese in the class just nod in agreement.

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An official Japanese survey on racism?

Yeah, right.

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Great... not sure if it is as important as the need to stop harassment and intimidation from kindergarten to corporate levels. Or.., there may be a need to survey if all the required education that spends billions are actually benefiting the population or not.

Racism is extremely difficult to define and prepare a meaningful set of questions.

Much of racial discrimination existed from the beginning of humanity. A lot today depends on actual personal experience by individuals that actually have faced and confronted people of other races. For others it is much a matter of hearsay and gossip.

After the questions gather data.., how will they be analyzed?

Sounds good, especially before the 2020 Olympics, but there may be more pressing issues that need such comprehensive research and study nationally.

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Just curious: what is the difference between discrimination and singling out someone because of differences for Japanese people? Some say they are really brutal towards handicapped people and people of disabilities. but they also have a way of singling out people of difference in character or personality as well. So how can discrimination be surveyed in that country? In a way, it is ok in their world, and a part of life. I personally would like to think human beings can be more compassionate. but if you don't have a soul, i guess it doesnt matter, just as long as you are cool and trendy.

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JaneM: "Smith, being allowed to vote or not has nothing to do with racism."

You talked about inclusion, did you not? I gave you a specific example of where not being Japanese leads to exclusion. My point is that it's likely going to be like most surveys here -- questions geared to I've the answers the people giving the survey want or expect to hear, not one of free opinion. As an example, I was given a survey just three days ago by a university student who wanted to ask about, word for word here, "Japanese vs. foreigner bathing habits". Some questions were, "a what is your favorite part of Japanese baths?" "Do you take a bath at night and go to bed clean and refreshed, or just shower in morning time?" "Do you like bathing and talking with other people and strengthening relationships, or are you afraid to be naked in front of others?" Here we're more like it, and when I said to the student, who is the child of a friend, that the questions are slanted and he should alter the wording so the questions are at least neutral, I got a disappointed look and my opinion was dismissed -- he didn't change a thing, of course. So, as I said in my initial comment, I hope the questions are honest and any opinions comments, good AND bad, are taken seriously and not just dismissed.

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Some questions were, "a what is your favorite part of Japanese baths?" "Do you take a bath at night and go to bed clean and refreshed, or just shower in morning time?" "Do you like bathing and talking with other people and strengthening relationships, or are you afraid to be naked in front of others?"

Hilarious, and so Japanese. OK, I know that this question list comes from a youngster, but the attitude that persists throughout society. I am sure that if it had been about going out drinking it would have been "Do you like drinking beer with a selection of delicious Japanese food to complement the drink or do you just drink beer?"

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Picked 8 pieces of ceramics, really nice work that pleased my eye. Me: "These, please...". Shop keeper: "Sorry, cannot sell this because it is sample." Me: "Oh, that's a shame. Well, I would like the rest, please." Shop keeper; "Unfortunately this is also sample." (there were several dozens of them and none of them were marked in anyway special - first suspicions rose here) Me: "Oh, sorry. I will go and change this into another cup." Shop keeper: "They are all samples." Rude as it may have been, I did not bother to return the 8 pieces to their places, but left them to the counter; "Perhaps I will come again, when you have restocked sellable items" ...and walked out of the shop.

I have spent decent amount of time in Japan, and situations like this are very rare. When I am denied service or access, it has always been done politely, with quasi-believable excuses - the kind that clearly let you understand that you are not welcomed, but allow the pretence of acting as if the excuse was real.

Then there is the question what constitutes as discrimination. I feel that my cases, being denied something based on my appearance that is available to others, are clearly a form of discrimination. Some would place the bar lower, some might put it higher. Some might "decide" case by case based on how they felt about it (my notes above on polite refusal). In addition, foreigners race, sex and appearance is likely to affect the attitudes one encounters.

I hope to see the whole study, the questions, answers and their interpretation, once it has been completed. I hope the results will also try to probe in some way to the attributes of the participants. I will try to remember this when the end of march comes.

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