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Japan to ease language requirements for foreign nursing care trainees

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17 Comments
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Expects, expects, expects. The government is terribly slow, even snail-like, to react to reality on the ground, so they have little right to expect anything.

Always better to hope than to expect, as they will surely be disappointed once again otherwise.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Japan introduced the technical intern program for foreigners in 1993 with the aim of transferring skills to developing countries

Im quite sure these developing countries already have obtained the skills of changing adult diapers and cleaning bathrooms and toilets. These are pretty much the only duties these interns are given.

Lowering the language requirements shows pretty pretty clearly how desperate they are. They accepted 3,000 applications from Indonesia in 2012 and over 80% of them failed the language test. Of those who passed the test, 50% quit and returned home in the first six months due to unfair treatment and poor working conditions.

Its interesting how Japan promotes this as a big chance for people from developing countries to come to Japan and learn skills the only skill that they actually learn is Japanese (because they have to) and there treatment in the workplace amounts to a little more than house slaves.

If it smells like a lemon, looks like a lemon and tastes like a lemon. It is a lemon!

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Good comments & stats there, hustle.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Poor treatment and working conditions ensures no changes. Why would anyone come if they can use their English in another country instead and be treated like a normal person?

4 ( +7 / -3 )

When my father's second wife was dying, he checked around for caregivers and was recommended to hire a Tongan for two reasons: physical strength and great love of family. Her English was far from perfect, but I can't imagine a better caregiver. Language proficiency is often somewhat down on the list of priorities in these cases.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

They accept nursing trainee from 2-3 countries only. I asked them trainee visa for my wife who is working as qualified nurse in india, but immigration denied visa application.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Unlike most English teachers, these care givers are trained professionals in their field. THEY ARE IN DEMAND. Money talks, increase their pay.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Tony G:

Unless I'm wrong, being an English teacher requires a bachelors degree and certification in teaching or ESL, and another certification in English.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

A degree and certification are both present, just as in nursing or law. They are professionals.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Don't see any incentive for foreign workers in doing this. So after 3 years of internship, then right to obtain new visa? then what?? Many other Asian countries are or will be having huge graying population problem. Might as well go to other countries that offer workers to settle, raise families and seek secure life. Wake up and smell the coffee Japan!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Why shouldn't these people have been subject to a higher standard for Japanese language proficiency? We're talking critical care of native Japanese people, not working the rice fields. Some people need to stop with the automatic criticism of all things Japanese. After all, these people wouldn't tolerate one bit if a nurse in their home countries couldn't speak the language well.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

After all, these people wouldn't tolerate one bit if a nurse in their home countries couldn't speak the language well.

We don't have this problem

1 ( +1 / -0 )

From my earliers, I see a few people don't respect teachers

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In any working place a common language is of the utmost importance. If the Japanese staff don't speak English well and the foreign staff don't speak Japanese well there are bound to be complications. Then there are Japanese dialects which can be difficult for those who only know standard Japanese.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Good comments & stats there, hustle.

Just a bit out of date.

For the 2017 exam the passage rate was 48.8 percent for foreign nationals versus 70.8 percent overall. Vietnamese exam takers did better than Japanese nationals. Their passage rate was 93.7 percent.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2018/03/29/national/number-foreign-caregivers-passed-japans-certification-exam-doubled-2017-welfare-ministry/

Some people need to stop with the automatic criticism of all things Japanese.

Indeed!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Unless I'm wrong, being an English teacher requires a bachelors degree and certification in teaching or ESL, and another certification in English.

Reality is much different.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Back on topic please.

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