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Japanese TV networks to begin online streaming to entice younger viewers

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More ways to watch talento screaming “Oishii” at whatever food is put in front of them? Such progress!

14 ( +15 / -1 )

Perhaps they're not watching as most of what is broadcast is pure drivel?

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Public broadcaster NHK has said it will begin streaming its programs online from April.

Good old NHK jumping in first. This will mean that anybody with access to the internet will be made to pay their extortion fees. How wonderful!

9 ( +10 / -1 )

As factchecker alluded to:

Streaming technology is easier to use than actually improving the content.

Who wants to watch the 15th program of the week where ‘comedian’ A hits ‘comedian’ B with a plastic hammer then rushes over to eat anything and scream ‘oishiiii,’ look at a product and scream ‘kawaiiiii,’ or learn anything about someplace not their hometown and scream ‘ehhhhh?!’

Plus,

some shows may be unavailable due to difficulty obtaining consent from the cast and therefore substituted with a freeze frame, the sources said.

So they’re just going to throw up their regular programming with 30 to 90 minute static pictures for ‘unstreamable’ shows? Sounds like the executives really have a handle on how streaming should work.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

The problem isn't the conduit, it's the content. Most Japanese TV is an insult to viewers' intelligence.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Other countries are already years ahead of this. Japan is playing catch-up and only in a half-hearted way.

Perhaps in a decade it'll be normal to stream radio.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Same boring programming that the youth is burned out of watching. The young want drama, action and comedy movies not boring talk shows that only talk amongst themselves and not to the audience.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

So, So out of date.

Johnnie-come-latelies scared of their own irrelevance, trying to put up a progressive cutting edge image.

These are the same networks - Nippon TV, Fuji, Asahi, TBS - who colluded to ban Panasonics Smart IPTV commercial from airing on their channels in 2013. It was illegal of course because the short CM showing a family enjoying internet tv, broke no rules for admissibility. In addition other than Sony's Bravia - no other Japanese built smart tv has been available for sale. Why? Probably because of Sonys tie up with Google - and No One chalenges Google. Only recently have brands like LG & Samsung smart tvs become available (ubiquitous globally) in limited supply.

Why? Because they were afraid of the future. They were afraid of losing control over their TV fiefdom. The offerings of Smart tv, internet, streaming, on demand etc represented the breakdown of their Galapagos Empires.

Now 7 years on, they're trying to get in on the act and present themselves as "modern" to grab hold of their dwindling audiences. So typical.

Every year over the past few years I ask my uni students if they watch tv or not and consistently the positive responses are in the low single digits %.

I hope these same students never turn back to the dinosaurs of media Inc.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Same boring programming that the youth is burned out of watching. The young want drama, action and comedy movies not boring talk shows that only talk amongst themselves and not to the audience.

Also don't forget that usually the entire program is a commercial, often for some type of food. This on top of the regular commercial breaks...

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I read something in a Chinese newspaper that people on the mainland gaze at their phones for 48 hours a week on average. That's two full days, but considerably more if you deduct time spent sleeping. The first message transmitted by telegraph inventor Samuel Morse asked "What hath God wrought?" I wonder what Morse would say about people today. Maybe "SOS --- humanity has gone completely nuts!"

2 ( +2 / -0 )

happy 2014 ya'll

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I love NHK radio!

NHK radio 1 - pop music

NHK radio 2 - classic pop music

NHK radio 3 - classical music

NHK radio 4 - news, drama, comedy

NHK radio 4 extra - classic drama and comedy

NHK radio 5 - sport

NHK radio 6 - rock music

Not to mention all the local NHK radio stations, one for each city in the country.

And all available via FM, DAB, and Internet.

Oh no, I've made a mistake - that's the BBC, who offers all that choice on just a fraction of the income of NHK.

And that's just radio, when it comes to TV the difference is even greater!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

There are so many alternatives to streaming Japanese TV.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I look forward to being charged for the gift of streaming Inka and bad Karaoke, pretty sure won't be watching it and pretty sure they will try to charge me for it. Next new phones with have the fee attached and automatic payment as part of the contract. Just another way to ripoff the public.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

> Do the hustleToday  06:51 am JST

Public broadcaster NHK has said it will begin streaming its programs online from April.

Good old NHK jumping in first. This will mean that anybody with access to the internet will be made to pay their extortion fees. How wonderful!

There's a chance that won't happen:

"NHK has indicated it doesn't intend to collect viewer fees from people who have an internet connection but no television once the new simultaneous service is launched."

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20191122/p2a/00m/0bu/013000c

But who knows, they may change their minds later when they feel they want more money from us.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Great I've been wondering when the TV executives here will recognize the opportunity live streaming of the Olympics presents and resolve the issue about showing commercials outside the licensed broadcast areas.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

We can already watch our TV channels on our smart phones from our Hikari TV when we are out or even around the house. But watching video using the Giga data unless on wifi.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Tokyo-m, that's all about to change since the BBC will soon no longer be able to charge a license fee to everyone.

Streaming online is a good idea for ensuring capture of revenue - you pay for what you watch. Sadly it's generally a monthly subscription basis first, so you have to subscribe to a service first, rather than cherry-pick what you want to watch.

And cross-border streaming is completely undemocratic - once this gets sorted out, then we will truly have a Global media revolution. Perhaps the next big thing - like the .com era... but for now, its held back by protectionism.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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