national

Japan voters seen boosting Abe in parliament vote

37 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© 2016 AFP

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

37 Comments
Login to comment

Goodbye Japanese "democracy". Saturday will be its swan song.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

“My salary has been cut because of the economy,” said a 31-year-old construction worker, who declined to give his name and doesn’t plan to vote.

It's idiots like this, and this......

“They are opposing the government for the sake of opposing it,” he added. “I don’t have a choice other than to vote for the LDP.”

.... And this, which will doom us all.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

But where are the OTHER candidates??? All im hearing is "Abe this and that. " I dont see ANY opposition? Here at my station they are ONLY promoting ABE and his party, I haven't seen ANYTHING else being promoted.

I feel the voting sheet will be like: [ ] Abe [ ] Abe [ ] Abe [ ] Some other dude ( in tiny letters)

11 ( +11 / -0 )

The LDP has all those new, brainwashed automatons voting for them now.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

“I don’t have a choice other than to vote for the LDP.”

What? Of course everyone has a choice. If you don't agree with the LDP then please do not vote for the LDP but the closest opposition. The LDP can be controlled if the opposition is strong!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Problem is even if Japan elect the oppositions to the majority, he/she will be cast out for vote of non-confidence when the slightest problem arise or if he/she went against the wishes of Uncle Sam.

So at the end of the day, LDP rules because its the devil everyone knows.

This isn't about democracy, its about maintaining stability and control.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

"Japan is safe."

For the next few days at least.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

I think that since I pay taxes, pay into the pension fund have a family and have been here 23 years, I should have the right to vote. As well as many others like myself here in the archipelago.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

I think some would even be OK with fascism if they believed that it promoted "stability"...

6 ( +7 / -1 )

@redfender

If you want to vote, citizenship is very easy to get - especially if you've bern here for 23 years.

-10 ( +0 / -10 )

It's actually a really sad reality. The people know that Abe and his LDP are frauds with their own agenda, but they feel that it's better to stay with the devil you know than to vote for a change. Alas, I can't be too hard on them for the defeatist attitude because politics in Japan is just this miasma of doublespeak and duplicity. Heck! I'd be disheartened too.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I remember the time after WW2, people were poor.

If your point of reference against which you measure Abe,s performance are the immediate post WW2 years, then heaven help us all. Nothing will ever change. Most of Europe was devastated and poor after WW2 but somehow the Europeans have the capacity to judge candidates on their current performance, policies and ideas, not comparing them to what was 70 years ago. Aim a little higher than the post war years comparisons for h sake.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Vote in a load of Osaka Initiatives reformers and Japan will certainly not be any worse off, and may just start to get better.

They are the only hope.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm not sure whether to laugh or cry after reading this ludicrousness. You've got half of the population that won't vote because they don't like the LDP and the other half that vote for the LDP because they don't like or know anything about the opposition party. No doubt this has been the norm for the past 60 odd years keeping the LDP in power. It seems that, apathy and stupidity are one in the same.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

It never ceases to amaze me.....Then again, in the US, people are opting for either Clinton or Trump. Maybe this is the problem with democracy. People are just too stupid.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

fxgaiJUL. 07, 2016 - 10:07PM JST

Vote in a load of Osaka Initiatives reformers and Japan will certainly not be any worse off, and may just start to get better.

They are the only hope.

That bunch that Hashimoto used to lead? They've been around for a while and don't seem to have achieved a whole lot. I'd pin my hopes on someone else.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Wow, that's a lot of downvotes. Why are people so opposed to the idea of becoming a citizen and voting?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Simon, who would be better?

I'm for reforms, I believe reforms are what has been missing in Japan for decades, and I believe the Osaka Initiatives party did well enough in Osaka to inspirer hope for the rest of the nation.

That they only attract between 2 and 10% of the vote tells me I may be right on this one!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The others are horrible,” said Tokyo resident Akira Hachinohe, 52, who plans to vote for Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party

What? And Abe and the LDP aren't???

“I don’t think the election will change anything for me,” he added.

If article 9 is reinterpreted by Abe then the election will change anything for you jackass- and not for the better.

In a recent poll by the top-selling Yomiuri Shimbun daily, 45 percent disapproved of Abe’s economic policies. Some 74 percent said they did not “feel” the recovery Abe touts. But the same survey indicated a 49-percent approval rating for his government.

Sigh. Japanese Sheeple.

Anybody who can hang on and provide stability and predictability is good”

Well then vote for the opposition as they don't want to change the constitution that's been there for 70 years. How's that for stability and predictability?

“The economy and other things were horrible before” he came to power, said a 72-year-old real estate agent, who declined to give his name.

The economy is even more horrible now sir.

“Japan is safe. People are comfortable,” he added.

(Twilight Zone Theme playing in my head now)

Goodbye Japanese "democracy". Saturday will be its swan song.

Yep.

I think that since I pay taxes, pay into the pension fund have a family and have been here 23 years, I should have the right to vote. As well as many others like myself here in the archipelago

Agree 100%.

If you want to vote, citizenship is very easy to get -

No its not.

Wow, that's a lot of downvotes. Why are people so opposed to the idea of becoming a citizen and voting?

People are opposed to the idea that they have to pay the same taxes as the Japanese do even if they are not citizens, but only get the vote if they become citizens. People are also opposed to the idea that they have to give up their citizenship to get Japanese citizenship to be able to vote.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

If you want to vote, citizenship is very easy to get -

No its not.

It's really not that hard. Not much difference from applying for Permanent Residence.

People are opposed to the idea that they have to pay the same taxes as the Japanese do even if they are not citizens, but only get the vote if they become citizens.

It's their choice not to become citizens. Japan gives them an avenue to get the vote. Not Japan's fault if they don't want to use that avenue.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Strangerland.

It's really not that hard. Not much difference from applying for Permanent Residence.

You obviously haven't applied for citizenship or know closely anyone who has applied for it.

Permanent residence is just a glorified spouse visa in 98% of the cases. Citizenship is not and the difference in privileges is reflected in the difference in requirements.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

You obviously haven't applied for citizenship or know closely anyone who has applied for it.

I do know someone, my comments are pretty much directly his comments.

Permanent residence is just a glorified spouse visa in 98% of the cases. Citizenship is not and the difference in privileges is reflected in the difference in requirements.

Ok? And?

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

StrangerlandJul. 08, 2016 - 09:24AM JST

I do know someone, my comments are pretty much directly his comments.

Your comment is pretty much wrong, but why let the truth get in the way?

The requirements, when applying for Japanese citizenship include... oh forget it , why bother?... you go and check it out but ultimately be willing to relinquish the citizenship of your native country once Japanese citizenship is granted

The requirements, when applying for Japanese PR is paying some lawyer Y100,000 and he/she will do all the leg work.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

“I don’t have a choice other than to vote for the LDP.”

Once Dishonest Abe gets his grubby hands on the constitution you won't have a choice: the LDP will be the only party allowed on the ballot.

“Japan is safe. People are comfortable,” he added. “I remember the time after World War II. People were poor.”

Japan is getting poorer by the day. Still, it's not as bad as when people lived in caves and were ravaged by bubonic plague. What better reason could there be to vote LDP?

I was talking with a naturalised Japanese recently. He didn't have any problems with the process even though his Japanese language ability is dismal. Apparently they even told him he could keep his other passport as long as he didn't use it to enter or leave Japan.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@gary Raynor

I got PR years ago, it was simple. I lived here for 10 years on work visas, paid my taxes and didn't get arrested. It cost less than 10,000. No lawyer needed to fill out a couple of forms.

Citizenship is way easier. Live here for 5 years. Cost a couple thousand yen for paperwork from city hall. Have an interview with immigration - that took 10 minutes, tops. The biggest cost I incurred was getting copies of things from overseas. All in all its still cost less than PR.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

hokkaidoguy

Citizenship is way easier.

OK, I’ll bite

Naturalization Permission Application Form (with picture)

Outline of your overseas relatives (shinzoku no gaiyou). This includes names and addresses of all members of your immediate family

A list of all your addresses since birth (rireki sho)

Japanese documents: ward registration forms for all members of your Japanese family as far as the parents stage.

Proof of Residence Form (juumin hyou) for your spouse…Your gaijin card with history of where you've lived for the past five years in Japan.

An outline of your livelihood (seikei no gaiyou).

Proof of your employment (zaikin shoumeisho)

Proof of your earnings (gensen choushuu hyou)…Tax records from the local tax office for your family and business (to show you've paid)

Records, contracts showing your land ownership and house ownership

Snapshots of your family, home, and workplace.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Back on topic please.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's really not that hard. Not much difference from applying for Permanent Residence.

Oh yes it is. I've looked into it. There are ALOT of documents you have to get from your home country which you don't need for PR

You obviously haven't applied for citizenship or know closely anyone who has applied for it. I do know someone,

meaning you yourself don't know cause you've never looked into it. I have, and its not easy, believe me.

Just needed to respond to that. Anyway,...

Analysts predict the ageing and conservative electorate will back Abe as the only viable choice faced with an opposition widely criticised as ineffectual.

This is the problem. Too many old people voting to steer the country in a way the country doesn't need to be going as these old people aren't going to be here 20-30 years from now. The policies might benefit them now, but what about the future generations.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

“They are opposing the government for the sake of opposing it,” he added. “I don’t have a choice other than to vote for the LDP.”

Ahhh, the sheepish voter. A voice from the silent majority.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

First of all, 242 Upper House seats is WAY too many. Or does it take this many of them to change a light bulb?

And I seriously don't understand the Japanese when it comes to politics. Thinking along the lines of "We think the LDP is horrible, but the opposition is horrible too so I will vote for LDP" makes no sense. There's enough parties out there to find out which one fits your beliefs the best, but they just don't care to research. Not to mention, if they're both horrible, isn't it preferable not to give the one party overwhelming power, everyone single elections except for two years?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

And I seriously don't understand the Japanese when it comes to politics.

I don't think anyone does, including the Japanese themselves.

Not to mention, if they're both horrible, isn't it preferable not to give the one party overwhelming power,

Exactly. If the LDP can run amok its going to be a disaster.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Let the people pay for their mistakes. Foolish, foolish nation.

The only country to ever be hit with two atomic bombs and they're letting a maniac undo 80 years of pacifism that's kept this country one of the most peaceful places on earth all this time.

Idiots deserve what they get.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

People voting for Brexit

People voting for LDP

People are wise

Why have a democracy

1 ( +1 / -0 )

“My salary has been cut because of the economy,” said a 31-year-old construction worker, who declined to give his name and doesn’t plan to vote.

Odd because thanks to Abe's pork barrel spending and Fukushima, there is a construction boom.

“Anybody who can hang on and provide stability and predictability is good” in the eyes of most voters, said Saori Katada, who teaches international relations at the University of Southern California.

Amazing the efforts foreign news agencies (AFP in this case) make to get real expertise on Japan. They go all the way to southern California. I'm far too lazy to be a real foreign correspondent. I would have asked the opinion of the many Japanese academics specializing in political science at universities here in Tokyo.

Goodbye Japanese "democracy". Saturday will be its swan song.

Indeed. We need someone like Donald Trump to lead us to true democracy.

I feel the voting sheet will be like: [ ] Abe [ ] Abe [ ] Abe [ ] Some other dude ( in tiny letters)

A real expert on Japanese elections speaks out. As in Britain, people do not elect the PM. The only time his name will appear on a ballot is in a general election for the lower house and his name will only be on the ballot for the district he represents (Yamaguchi 4th district). If you are sufficiently concerned about what it going on in Japanese politics, you should study how the system is structured.

This isn't about democracy, its about maintaining stability and control.

If the voters vote for stability, that's democracy in my book. How do you define democracy? If it's the opposite of stability and control, Syria, Iraq, and Libya represent democracy at its finest.

I think that since I pay taxes, pay into the pension fund have a family and have been here 23 years, I should have the right to vote. As well as many others like myself here in the archipelago.

I think you should naturalize. I've been taxes in Britain since 1989. I am still paying taxes in Britain. This does not get me the right to vote in national elections.

The requirements, when applying for Japanese citizenship include... oh forget it , why bother?... you go and check it out but ultimately be willing to relinquish the citizenship of your native country once Japanese citizenship is granted

The paperwork for getting citizenship in Japan is comparable to doing an application to get a Japanese national a Green Card for the US. I was naturalized in 2014. I speak from direct experience. I did it all without outside legal assistance.

First of all, 242 Upper House seats is WAY too many. Or does it take this many of them to change a light bulb?

The ratio of Diet members to population is actually low when compared to other countries with elected parliaments.

And I seriously don't understand the Japanese when it comes to politics. Thinking along the lines of "We think the LDP is horrible, but the opposition is horrible too so I will vote for LDP" makes no sense.

From what I have read, a large fraction of American voters are disgusted by both Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump but they will still vote for one of them. Is that psychology so different from what one sees in Japan?

The only country to ever be hit with two atomic bombs and they're letting a maniac undo 80 years of pacifism that's kept this country one of the most peaceful places on earth all this time. Idiots deserve what they get.

Many will not vote for the LDP and not a single Japanese will be voting directly for or against Abe in this election. Article 9, what Abe would probably like to do away with, is part of the American-written constitution that came into effect on 3 May 1947.

My calculator says that it is 69 years since Japan became “pacifist.” Eighty years ago (1936) Japan was one year away from all out war in China and was fighting regular skirmishes with “bandits” in Manchuria.

If you are sufficiently concerned about what is going on in Japan to want to comment on our domestic politics, you should educate yourself before blowing off.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Indeed. We need someone like Donald Trump to lead us to true democracy.

We already do. His name is Shinzo Abe.

I've been taxes in Britain since 1989. I am still paying taxes in Britain. This does not get me the right to vote in national elections.

BS. You can vote. IN FACT, foreign residents WERE elligible to vote in the Brexit referendum while British Citizens like mysefl living outside of the UK COULDN'T.

The paperwork for getting citizenship in Japan is comparable to doing an application to get a Japanese national a Green Card for the US.

So what?

From what I have read, a large fraction of American voters are disgusted by both Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump but they will still vote for one of them. Is that psychology so different from what one sees in Japan?

Very different. There will be debates between Clinton and Trump. Abe has dodged debating Okada inspite of Okada trying to get him to do so.

Eighty years ago (1936) Japan was one year away from all out war in China and was fighting regular skirmishes with “bandits” in Manchuria.

You invaded THEIR country and they were the bandits???

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Aly RustomJUL. 09, 2016 - 10:37AM JST

BS. You can vote. IN FACT, foreign residents WERE elligible to vote in the Brexit referendum while British Citizens like mysefl living outside of the UK COULDN'T.

Actually, non-EU and non-Commonwealth citizens resident in the UK can't vote in any national elections. UK, Irish and Commonwealth citizens can vote in any election, residents from other EU countries can vote in any elections except general elections. For a referendum the rules are a bit different.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Your comment is pretty much wrong, but why let the truth get in the way?

You say that, but are unable to show how my comment is wrong.

The requirements, when applying for Japanese citizenship include... oh forget it , why bother?... you go and check it out but ultimately be willing to relinquish the citizenship of your native country once Japanese citizenship is granted

I have zero interest in giving up my citizenship, which is why I've never applied for Japanese citizenship. And since it is my decision not to get citizenship, I don't complain about not being able to vote.

The requirements, when applying for Japanese PR is paying some lawyer Y100,000 and he/she will do all the leg work.

I used a notary (行政書士) myself. But that wasn't a requirement, it was just cheaper than if I had used that time to apply myself.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites