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Whalers return from Antarctic; no protest activities reported

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Excellent and that is the way it should be.

-5 ( +20 / -25 )

More whale meat for the freezers.

If it was really about research, they wouldn't then turn around and sell / distribute the whale meat.

Research, my a$$!

-2 ( +19 / -21 )

Sea Shepherd already stated last year they gave up their Antarctic campaign which it just became too expensive and difficult to keep up with the faster whaling fleet.

¥100 million "study" on replacing the whaling factory ship.

Without the enormous government subsidies the whaling industry which does not employ many would be sunk and unable to support itself commercially.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hope their research will be published for the Japanese consumer, or maybe they could publish an article like this one from the Faroe Islands traditional whale catch, something the Faroe islanders did themselves. :https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16159-faroe-islanders-told-to-stop-eating-toxic-whales/

5 ( +13 / -8 )

Hope their research will be published

To be fair more than 100 peer-to-peer science papers have been published at something like a cost of about ¥100 million a paper. Most are also available in English as well as Japanese. Some of the findings were dismissed by other peer scientists.

Many of those papers were rejected by the international court and dismissed Japan's claim of 666 papers and only accepted two papers. Founded on faulty data according to the IC

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/18/the-truth-about-the-peer-reviewed-science-produced-by-japans-whaling

But we know its about consumption and not really about research.

0 ( +16 / -16 )

"Three Japanese whaling vessels returned to the southwestern port of Shimonoseki on Saturday after slaughtering 333 minke whales in the Antarctic Ocean as planned." There, fixed that for you.

-10 ( +9 / -19 )

This is the stupidity of the Japanese whaling "uhum" research. They are researching the viability of a return to commercial whaling with a view of slaughtering up to and beyond 10,000 whales every year and not just minke whales. They have their eyes on humpbacks and southern right whales as well. What the heck are they gonna do with all the whale meat? They can't even sell the meat from the 333 whales they are taking for "uhum" research. No matter how many whales there are, there will never be a large enough market for the meat to make it commercially viable. This means, both their research and reason for whaling are both BS. They seem to be doing it just for some cultural defiance of "Don't tell us what to do!" - Japan does not need to hunt whales commercially and they know how strongly the rest of the world objects to their southern ocean hunts. Therefore, it can only be a case of "Don't tell us what to do gaijin!" - I think the Southpark episode of "Whale Whores" summed up the Japanese stance pretty well.

-6 ( +13 / -19 )

Where does the figure of Japan wanting to kill 10,000 whales every year come from?

15 ( +18 / -3 )

@Disilusioned...excellent comment and spot on mate!

-8 ( +9 / -17 )

They are just proving that Japanese don’t respect international laws that they themselves committed to thereby showing to the world that they have no ethics and no honor.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Precisely

-15 ( +1 / -16 )

Seems a lot of Japanese peer reviewed articles has made up data.

-7 ( +9 / -16 )

I strongly oppose to the whaling under the name of scientific research. Actually it's an overt lie. Japan need to cooperate with other whaling countries and create a new framework of commercial whaling and then go hunt whales fair and square.

-9 ( +7 / -16 )

They are just proving that Japanese don’t respect international laws that they themselves committed to thereby showing to the world that they have no ethics and no honor.

They are operating within the rules that have been set.

I can understand you don't like it, and I don't think they should do it myself. But rhetoric and yelling isn't going to fix it, and doesn't help any.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

If stocks are sustainable then I see no issue with it? If stocks are low then yes stop and wait for them to replenish!

Having actually spent time with whalers you would find that those that embark on these voyages are men of solid morals and have a very high sense of tradition! They are it ruthless murderes, as some people would have you think, and fully understand what they are doing and how best to do it with the upmost regard for their prey! To brand people without knowing them or their beliefs shows a missive disreaged for them also a severe misunderstanding of their culture!

Everyone is entitled to their view of course but if you want to go down the route of accusing people of being criminals then Sea Shepard would be prime candidates! A so called environmental organisation that operates under false pretences with questionable legalities and highly suspectable members or questionable history and morals! They are nothing but nautical terrorists and pirates that put ships and sailors in danger with no thought for theirs or others safety, blatantly disregarding the rules of the sea!

4 ( +17 / -13 )

his means, both their research and reason for whaling are both BS. They seem to be doing it just for some cultural defiance of "Don't tell us what to do!" - Japan does not need to hunt whales commercially and they know how strongly the rest of the world objects to their southern ocean hunts. Therefore, it can only be a case of "Don't tell us what to do gaijin!" -

I agree, this can,t really be about either reseach or commercial whaling resumption as there is nowhere near the demand for it. I think the reason for the continued whaling is dual...one as you say its the oyaji pride " gaikoku will not tell us what to do, its our " tradition " even as its painfully obvious that Japan,s tradition of Antarctic hunts only goes back a few decades. The other part of the reason is the scourge of Japan...the amakudari and corrupt connections between current and retired bureaucrats, politicians and inefficient J business. Obviously this " research institute" oyajis are well enough connected to be sucking up our tax money for their inefficient, dinosaur age industry.

-9 ( +8 / -17 )

Hope their research will be published for the Japanese consumer,

It's published in selected supermarkets.

To brand people without knowing them or their beliefs shows a missive disreaged for them also a severe misunderstanding of their culture!

What is there to understand? They make a living out of killing sentient beings and as such are no better than people who work in slaughterhouses in the Western world, or in the dogmeat markets of China and Korea, or in the cat meat markets of Thailand.

"Three Japanese whaling vessels returned to the southwestern port of Shimonoseki on Saturday after slaughtering 333 minke whales in the Antarctic Ocean as planned." There, fixed that for you.

You omitted the fact that they left the greater part of the carcasses in the Southern Ocean, and brought back only the 'tastier' (most 'researchable'?) bits. The days of 'every bit of the whale is put to use' are long gone, unless you include feeding Southern Ocean scavengers as 'putting the whale to use'.

the amakudari and corrupt connections 

This is what keeps it going.

-7 ( +10 / -17 )

@zichi - Where does the figure of Japan wanting to kill 10,000 whales every year come from?

Yeah, fair call Zichi. Nowhere does it state that number. However, Japan was catching (or attempting to) 1,000 whales per year before the international court ruled it a farce. During the 90's and early 2,000's they were catching 800-1,000 whales every year, but the resale of the meat only covered around 10% of the cost of sending their fleet to the southern oceans. This means, if Japan intends to make whaling a commercially viable industry they will have to catch 10 times more whales. This is where the figure of 10,000 whales per year comes from, even though, there is no market for the meat to support a commercial quantity catch quota.

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

Japan, single handedly managing the Whale stocks within the Antarctic.... hmm...

-13 ( +2 / -15 )

If it was really about research, they wouldn't then turn around and sell / distribute the whale meat.

The same regulations that allow research whaling REQUIRE the meat to be processed.

with a view of slaughtering up to and beyond 10,000 whales every year and not just minke whales

What? Where does this idea come from? Any sources?

This means, if Japan intends to make whaling a commercially viable industry they will have to catch 10 times more whales. This is where the figure of 10,000 whales per year comes from, even though, there is no market for the meat to support a commercial quantity catch quota.

Producing more of a product that has a limited demand does not magically make it economical. In fact the law od supply and demand says the exact opposite. Putting out more product will drive the price even lower while production costs go up. The logic leading to a claim of wanting to hunt 10,000 whales a year is seriously flawed.

Also, if commercial whaling is allowed (the moratorium on some species is lifted) then the IWC will issue quotas which undoubtedly would not be anywhere near 10,000 whales per year.

0 ( +12 / -12 )

This topic is surprising, for a country that in many many areas is world leading and introduces worlds best practice, yet in this area they show that some in Japan are still both uncivilised and barbaric.

Uncivilised as the whale slaughter for meat is unnecessary and unwanted even in Japan.

Barbaric in that they slaughter such majestic creatures just to prove that they dont have to answer to anyone else. Many Japanese object to this practice and the expense of keeping it going.

The few overriding the wishes of the many in Japan.

-11 ( +7 / -18 )

Whale harvesting is an excellent form of farming. Whale meat provides extremely delicious meat for Japanese families. Various biproducts from whale harvests provide numerous profitable and useful products for Japanese families.

Whaling is a deeply entrenched cultural tradition in Japanese society and history. The harvesting of mammals is a very common and popular way that societies provide protein and nutritional meals for families.

Whale harvests are The settled law of the land in Japan and thankfully will be around forever because it’s a highly sustainable form of animal farming.

-3 ( +11 / -14 )

Good for Japan.

Their country, their culture.

4 ( +15 / -11 )

Whale harvests are The settled law of the land in Japan and thankfully will be around forever...

Yes, so thankful that all natural resources are limitless and therefore will be around forever. ...Except for those that aren't and won't be...

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

Good for Japan. Their country, their culture.

Yes, the seas on Antarctica are a part of Japan's country and culture... except they aren't. I sense a pattern developing here...

-6 ( +9 / -15 )

Ironically, I saw on TV news last week, abundance of whales on Australian seashore, most dead or going to die, many injured and few survived. I want to know what was that, any news from anti-whaling group Sea Shepherd?

-6 ( +10 / -16 )

Whale harvests are The settled law of the land in Japan and thankfully will be around forever because it’s a highly sustainable form of animal farming.

It won't be around forever, as international pressure will hopefully see this barbaric practice outlawed.

-5 ( +8 / -13 )

Whale harvesting is an excellent form of farming. Whale meat provides extremely delicious meat for Japanese families. Various biproducts from whale harvests provide numerous profitable and useful products for Japanese families.

Seems the majority of the Japanese nation no longer agree with you since the majority no longer eats whale meat. About 10 years ago the annual consumption was about 5,000 tons but today its down to 2,500 tons. That works out at 0.01785 kg/person/year. Or about 18 grams.

Traditionally, when the whale was hunted the entire whale was used. That is no longer the case and only the belly is used for whale bacon and the fin. The rest is ditched over board.

-4 ( +10 / -14 )

@oldman_13 - Good for Japan. Their country, their culture.

Yeah! It's just inconvenient that the oceans and the whales belong to the world, isn't it?

-8 ( +7 / -15 )

...and thinking about it, the high levels of mercury and other toxins found in whale meat, that's just another argument to "protect innocent humans" by ending this farce of a whale hunt.

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Southpark++%22Whale+Whores%22+

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRXZPAoz-04

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Whales are not in danger of extinction. Those who wan to hunt hunt. Those who do not want to hunt do not hunt. Everybody is happy unless you want to dictate what should be or should not be on neighbor’s table.

2 ( +12 / -10 )

The vessels did not meet any protest by anti-whaling group Sea Shepherd, according to the Fisheries Agency. The group said in August it would not try to stop what Japan calls "research whaling" this time.

It appears that the eco-terrorist group SS is running out of other peoples money. Probably a result of those court cases decided against the eco-terrorist SS in the U.S.. Plus, Watson's brain damage limits his fund raising, and there are only a few nations left who will register the eco-terrorist's garbage scows. It appears that the eco-terrorist's history of violence, propaganda, and racism have finally caught up with them. RIP eco-terrorist SS.

1 ( +10 / -9 )

 It appears that the eco-terrorist's history of violence, propaganda, and racism have finally caught up with them. RIP eco-terrorist SS. no not really they still protest a number of other endevours around the world. You cant really compete against a government that continually throws endless taxpayer money at whaling just because of recalcitrant pride . Japans end game is to get commercial whaling back on the card so they can profit from petfood, since people will never consume the amount that they want to hunt. People cant see it now but in the end itll be the J taxpayer that is the loser in the end.

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

A lot of ignorance about figures and bringing up numbers with the thumb as source:

https://iwc.int/total-catches

http://time.com/4370478/norway-whaling-report/

5 ( +8 / -3 )

The same regulations that allow research whaling REQUIRE the meat to be processed.

The regulations require that the whales be processed, not just the meat. Most of the whale is simply chucked overboard in the Antarctic. One more aspect in which Japan does not abide by either the letter or the spirit of Article 8.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

One more aspect in which Japan does not abide by either the letter or the spirit of Article 8.

The regulation says to the extent practicable. So is there some proof they aren't doing so, actual proof not opinion?

4 ( +7 / -3 )

is there some proof they aren't doing so, actual proof not opinion?

The fact that they aren't doing it is surely proof enough. Add to that the fact that the ICR and their pro-whaler fanboys here on JT warble on about how the meat (the icr calls it 'byproducts'; a rose by any other name, since all they have to hand is the meat) must be processed, and totally ignore the rest of the animal which is discarded before the 'research' even begins, is pretty solid evidence that there is no intention of even considering what could practically be done with the bones, guts, blood, skin and less tasty cuts of meat.

The bones, guts, blood could be made into fertiliser. I personally wouldn't buy it, but then I wouldn't buy anything they handle. I'm not their target market. Surely all the Japanese people who (we are assured) support whaling would buy it if only to show their patriotism. Not to mention all those expats eagerly downvoting any anti-whaling opinion on this thread.

The less tasty bits of meat could be used in animal feed. I wouldn't buy it as pet food for my critters, but again, I'm never going to be the target. It could be used in zoos or fed to farm animals, which as we know are already fed any rubbish that caresses the bottom line. Including each other until that started causing problems that couldn't be pushed under the carpet.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

Talking about japanese culture : there are lots of abandoned shrines, temples, and parks in Shimonoseki. So the money the city receive to promote the "culture" of hunting whales could be used to repair and promote real culture and history.

People should do their research before talking about "culture" : search for abandoned shinto shrines, deserted tea ceremony or calligraphy classes, struggling swordsmiths or martial arts teachers etc... Things that have a real cultural value and could use more help from the government.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Whaling provides seasonal work to a small number of people. The company which owns the whaling ships is based in Tokyo. The crews of the whalers are not always 100% Japanese and also have foreigners because the wages are cheaper. The port of Shimonoseki won't earn much from the whaling. The actual whale meat belongs to the Institute of Cetacean Research (ICR), a semi-governmental organization of the Japan Fisheries Agency, established in 1987. They are Tokyo based and sell it at auction.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

he fact that they aren't doing it is surely proof enough.

Aren't do what?

Practicable does not mean every possible bit no matter the cost and effort involved.

 is pretty solid evidence that there is no intention of even considering what could practically be done

No, it isn't proof. It is an opinion.

The bones, guts, blood could be made into fertiliser.

> The less tasty bits of meat could be used in animal feed.

Maybe. But is it practicable? Just because something could be done doesn't make it practicable.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Maybe. But is it practicable? Just because something could be done doesn't make it practicable.

You mean like storing meat in freezers for years and years because they can't sell it, even at auction at rock-bottom prices? Is it practicable to force-feed it to kids in school lunches and to the sick in hospital meals, because the government sells it off at a loss?

If 'research' means the greater part of the animal has to be dumped into the ocean because it isn't 'practicable' to bring it back and make fuller use of it, and even the 'good' bits have to be dumped into school dinners, maybe that's a clear sign that the hunt sorry I mean the 'research' itself isn't practicable.

You're quite right, of course; just because something (like steaming to the other side of the world and slaughtering hundreds of animals slowly, painfully and agonisingly) can be done (at huge cost to the taxpayer) doesn't mean it should be done. Especially when it isn't practicable.

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

Inefficient, last century " industry " only surviving due to J govt oyaji intransingence and endless " tradition" of wasting taxpayer money propping up what should be left to market forces. All that taxpayer money would have been better spent subsiding new industry /retraining and job opportunities for the whaling communities. Everyone would have been a winner. Look at eg. the huge money spinner whale watching industry Australia built up after it abandoned whaling decades ago.

Alas oyajis and envelopes rule here.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

You mean like storing meat in freezers for years and years because they can't sell it, even at auction at rock-bottom prices?

Well, that would seem to indicate that they process it BEYOND what is practicable. It isn't practicable to process whale that won't be used. Thank you for proving that they at least process as far as practicable.

maybe that's a clear sign that the hunt sorry I mean the 'research' itself isn't practicable.

Very possibly. But the regulations don't put a practicable requirement on the research hunting itself, just the processing.

All that taxpayer money would have been better spent

Almost every area of government spending has some people who feel that taxpayer money could have been better spent in some other area.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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