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Japanese airlines to offer discount to people with mental disorders

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There are gonna be some 'eventful' flights.

-5 ( +16 / -21 )

Good to hear indeed. A good start to my day.

14 ( +20 / -6 )

Perhaps this will help in getting rid of the stigma of mental health issues that plagues Japan. (And, to be fair, the rest of the world.)

Imagine how many fewer crimes would be committed if people with mental health issues had appropriate access to professionals.

9 ( +17 / -8 )

I applaud the airline for doing this and I hope that people who need it, take advantage of the discounts and get to see more of their own country!

10 ( +16 / -6 )

YubaruToday 06:43 am JSTI applaud the airline for doing this and I hope that people who need it, take advantage of the discounts and get to see more of their own country!

And I'd like to see this benefit in America too. KUDOS!

6 ( +12 / -6 )

And what happens when a mentally ill person tries to open the door during flight?

-6 ( +14 / -20 )

I don't think they thought this through!!

3 ( +17 / -14 )

While their intent is good, increased security measures on board will be a must. If one of them freaks out and starts assaulting the cabin crew they'd need to have the means to protect themselves and other passengers. Pepper spray or tasers would be a good idea

-10 ( +5 / -15 )

I am trying to understand the logic here.

Why should people with mental disorders get a discount?

I can see the airlines introducing measures to make their flying experience less stressful.

Such as:

-- Use of a lounge before boarding.

-- Priority boarding to avoid the stress of general boarding.

-- Expedited check-in and baggage claim handing.

And so forth.

But giving them up to a 50% discount just because they have a mental disorder?

One of the advocates said that this would help them travel more widely and integrate into society?

Well, by that logic, a 50% discount for low income people would help them travel more widely too.

I applaud efforts to support those with mental disorders, but this just seems.... misplaced and even discriminatory against the general population.

15 ( +24 / -9 )

Chip Star, or access to the cockpit.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

And what happens when a mentally ill person tries to open the door during flight?

They'll be stopped.

8 ( +13 / -5 )

Well, by that logic, a 50% discount for low income people would help them travel more widely too.

It seems to me the counter argument here Katharine low income people, in theory, can improve their situation far easier than people with mental health issues.

I applaud efforts to support those with mental disorders, but this just seems.... misplaced and even discriminatory against the general population.

The issue with this is that the general population doesn't face widespread discrimination like those with mental health issues.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

The issue with this is that the general population doesn't face widespread discrimination like those with mental health issues.

OK, that may be true.

But the answer to widespread discrimination is not huge discounts on airfare.

What does a discount have to do with addressing discrimination?!

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Does it include schizophrenia?

0 ( +5 / -5 )

What does a discount have to do with addressing discrimination?!

An argument would be that it is levelling the playing field for those that have been discriminated against. Typically those that face widespread discrimination don't enjo the same level of economic success as those that don't face discrimination.

Discounting airfare is a way to recognize this. It also allows those that couldn't have afforded to travel via plane because of discrimination to do so.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

But the answer to widespread discrimination is not huge discounts on airfare.

> What does a discount have to do with addressing discrimination?!

Excellent point. I'm a foreigner. We suffer discrimination. Where's OUR discount??

3 ( +12 / -9 )

The issue with this is that the general population doesn't face widespread discrimination like those with mental health issues.

Very true. There's a lot of people who suffer from depression but can't talk about it because of the stigma. A few brave souls have come forward here and discussed it in the past but overall it's still seen as a kind of taboo.

Japan needs more mental health care and facilities - and whilst this is only a gesture, it's a decent one.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Yuji Nishizawa suffers from Aspergers and depression and has undergone psychiatric treatment for much of his life. On July 3, 1999, he broke into the cockpit of ANA flight 61, stabbed the pilot, killing him, and took control of the craft with 503 people aboard as it flew over Tokyo.  

Nishizawa attempted to fly the 747 under the Rainbow Bridge in Tokyo, and the plane dropped down to around 300 meters, before crew members managed to subdue him and very narrowly avert disaster.

Some of the people with the conditions mentioned in the article do pose a threat to civil aviation, and so this policy seems, well, crazy.

7 ( +14 / -7 )

Depression is difficult to diagnose. People all become depression. We are living in the world full of sufferings.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

It also allows those that couldn't have afforded to travel via plane because of discrimination to do so.

I doubt the discounts themselves will be enough to have a widespread effect but at least they are bringing the issue into the open and attempting a measure of redress.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Discounting airfare is a way to recognize this. It also allows those that couldn't have afforded to travel via plane because of discrimination to do so.

The moment one goes down this path, there is no end to it.

Everyone can claim discrimination for something and argue that they, too, deserve discounts on pricing.

I am not trying to be argumentative and I do believe that those with mental disorders have faced discrimination or face difficulties in society.

However, the right approach is to develop remedies that specifically address the discrimination or the difficulties one faces.

I would tell you that many ordinary Japanese would resent the heck out of those with mental disorders if they were to a get a 50% discount on airfare because they have a mental disorder. It could actually generate widespread resentment.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

There are a lot of things wrong with this plan. I also highly doubt the flight attendants are or were trained to handle a situation if a passenger(s) with a disability becomes too much to handle.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

Aly RustomToday 07:57 am JST

But the answer to widespread discrimination is not huge discounts on airfare.

What does a discount have to do with addressing discrimination?!*

Excellent point. I'm a foreigner. We suffer discrimination. Where's OUR discount??

You have the option to go back to your own country. No more discrimination. The vast majority of people who suffer from disorders as described in the article don't have such an option.

-2 ( +12 / -14 )

Samit BasuToday  07:04 am JST

And what happens when a mentally ill person tries to open the door during flight?

Christ, the article says people with mental disorders are going to get discounts, not that they're being allowed to board planes for the first time ever. You've been flying with people who have mental disorders your entire life. Not one of them has tried to open the door during flight. That zero isn't going to change just because their ticket now costs slightly less than it did before.

It's amazing the lengths some people will go to drum up hysteria against innocent people.

13 ( +17 / -4 )

Will documentation be needed, or may I self assess? :)

5 ( +10 / -5 )

I also highly doubt the flight attendants are or were trained to handle a situation if a passenger(s) with a disability becomes too much to handle.

If this was this a plan put in place with input from these various disability communities it may do some good. If it was a handout to make airlines and legislators feel better or wash their hands of the problem that isn't an approach I could support.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Folks, just an idea but I think the 50% discount would then ALLOW a person with a mental problem to have someone accompany them, together, the price is the same as a single person, mystery solved!

8 ( +11 / -3 )

It's amazing the lengths some people will go to drum up hysteria against innocent people.

Sadly, it's not amazing. It's predictable. Some people even think mental illness is a laugh, a bit of a jape.

As you correctly point out - mentally ill passengers fly every day - I'd be more worried about the boozed-up passengers who cause mayhem on flights and assault staff etc.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

I'l still trying to get my head around this.

I can understand offering to fly a disabled person (mental or physical) and a support person and split the cost of a single fare. This makes sense to me, as it opens a pathway for those with disabilities to travel who were previously discouraged from doing to by the cost of having to purchase an airfare for their respective support person as well.

Where a support person is not required, why would a discount still be applicable?

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Well, people with depression could use some time away so good initiative but I wonder how waterproof this plan is.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

All these people stating it will be dangerous have failed to realise that many of these mentally ill people are already using these airlines without discounts.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

katsu

Christ, the article says people with mental disorders are going to get discounts, not that they're being allowed to board planes for the first time ever. You've been flying with people who have mental disorders your entire life.

Precisely.... the only thing that changes is their ticket will be a bit cheaper. Fair enough...their life is not as easy as most of us here , I,d rather see them getting a discount than say ( already overpaid ) politicians for example .

10 ( +10 / -0 )

I am not trying to be argumentative and I do believe that those with mental disorders have faced discrimination or face difficulties in society.

I appreciate that you verbalized that you aren't trying to be argumentative. It was obvious by you not attacking me, but I still appreciate you saying it. I hope you understand that I'm also not trying to be argumentative, just engage in critical discourse.

The moment one goes down this path, there is no end to it.

Everyone can claim discrimination for something and argue that they, too, deserve discounts on pricing.

Yes, everyone can claim discrimination, but not everyone so claiming will have evidence that demonstrates they are part of a class of people that is discriminated against. This prevents the slippery slope you mentioned.

However, the right approach is to develop remedies that specifically address the discrimination or the difficulties one faces.

Agreed. That is what is being done here in relation to the discrimination mentally ill people face in getting well paying employment, which is key to having enough money to travel by air.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Where a support person is not required, why would a discount still be applicable?

One argument is that mentally ill people often times are limited to extremely low paying jobs and cannot afford the entire fare.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Not one of them has tried to open the door during flight. That zero isn't going to change just because their ticket now costs slightly less than it did before.

I agree that we've been flying with mentally ill people. However, I respectfully disagree that there isn't a possibility that more mentally ill people flying because of a discount won't increase the probability that one may try to open a door.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Where a support person is not required, why would a discount still be applicable?

I'm sure it would. Most emotional disorders don't require a support person What is the difference to the airline between one passenger flying at a discounted rate and two ?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

'Mental Disorder' is a very broad term.

If my girlfriend breaks up and I get depressed, should I qualify for a discount?

Me thinks not.

Epilepsy and Autism are definitely understandable, they should qualify as handicaps.

This needs to be regulated and implemented properly, otherwise we will have similar issues with that of emotional support animals and airlines in the US.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I don't get what the fuss is about if the airlines (a private company)  offer to reduce the price they charge for people with mental disabilities. They are not charging abled-bodies more, they are voluntarily reducing their income to provide something good to persons with disabilities. Crab mentality?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Imagine how many fewer crimes would be committed if people with mental health issues had appropriate access to professionals.

Or the ability to purchase airfare at a discount!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If my girlfriend breaks up and I get depressed, should I qualify for a discount?

Depends on whether or not it affects your entire existence. If you can bear to get up in the morning and face the world, if you become suicidal or self-harming.

Epilepsy and Autism are definitely understandable, they should qualify as handicaps.

We prefer the term "disability". I have a medical book from the mid 19th century where the "remedies" suggested for epilepsy included castration, incarceration in an institution or lobotomy. I like to think we've moved on since then. Epilepsy can be as mild as one seizure a year or several seizures every day of your life. And autism can be severe or barely discernible - all depending on the individual. How much it affects one's daily existence is down to the severity of the disability.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Do they need a doctors note certifying a mental disorder?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Chip StarToday 09:10 am JSTNot one of them has tried to open the door during flight. That zero isn't going to change just because their ticket now costs slightly less than it did before.

I agree that we've been flying with mentally ill people. However, I respectfully disagree that there isn't a possibility that more mentally ill people flying because of a discount won't increase the probability that one may try to open a door.

What is all this -uh, crazy hysteria about? Mental illness IS NOT what you've seen on TV during your life. It's MUCH more common than you think and it is a disability just like being in a wheelchair or diabetes is.

As for 'opening the door', the skyjacker D.B. Cooper did just that in late 1971 after he stole thousands of dollars in cash, and he parachuted somewhere over in Washington state. He was never found, he's a criminal 'legend' and only some money was found but nothing else. He was very calm and probably not 'mentally ill'. 

And what if someone gets drunk ('blitzed on the bird') or just plain bellicose on a flight and starts up a fight? Mental illness or not, these things happen. I've witnessed it myself on a cross-continental flight from California to Illinois.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

ulysses, that depends how do you love your girl. If she broke your heart, yes, you are qualified.

There is better ways than discount. To improve the services needed is the best of all. Discount should be for those who can't afford for a flight but really need it.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

talaraedokkoToday  09:44 am JST

“Do they need a doctors note certifying a mental disorder?”

The answer is in the article.

“a person in possession of an official welfare document certifying their condition.”

This has got me wondering about how they currently handle cases for physical disabilities involving travelers from overseas who wouldn’t have the Japanese shougaisha techo booklet for disabled that entitles them to various discounts. And how this new discount will (or perhaps not) be extended to non-residents.

DisillusionedToday  08:57 am JST

“All these people stating it will be dangerous have failed to realise that many of these mentally ill people are already using these airlines without discounts.”

Exactly. It’s not like they’ve all been locked away and are suddenly going to be unleashed onto the planes to cause havoc. And flight crews already have training for suddenly ill passengers, drunks, terroists, etc. There shouldn’t be any particularly noticeable difference.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

looks like I will be heading to the doctor for a certificate so I can get the discounts.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

 If you can bear to get up in the morning and face the world, if you become suicidal or self-harming.

If I do the above, should I be getting on a plane?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

However, the right approach is to develop remedies that specifically address the discrimination or the difficulties one faces.

I would tell you that many ordinary Japanese would resent the heck out of those with mental disorders if they were to a get a 50% discount on airfare because they have a mental disorder. It could actually generate widespread resentment.

Thanks zones2surf. That's what I would have wanted to say.

If I or a family member ever become physically disabled, I can tell you that the last thing I would want would be higher profile broadcasting or more events in the Paraolympics. Or more "look at these poor people" type segments on the 24hour charity marathons on tv. What I would want is the government to listen to advocacy groups for the disabled and do things that help disabled people in their everyday lives. For the mentally ill, more social workers and counsellors perhaps. Not things that look like PR exercises.

Since this is mandated, my suspicion is that the airlines will bill the government for the other 50% of the fares. Fairly recently, one of the airlines made the news due to a disabled man crawling up the stairs to the plane in Okinawa, after a standoff where airport staff told his companions they couldn't carry him. I hope this new policy will be accompanied with a more sensible application of the rules.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

What is all this -uh, crazy hysteria about? Mental illness IS NOT what you've seen on TV during your life. It's MUCH more common than you think and it is a disability just like being in a wheelchair or diabetes is.

Agreed 100%. That doesn't change the fact that people with mental illnesses act out in ways that people without mental illnesses do. It also does not change the fact that the probability of someone with a mental illness acting out goes up as the number of people with mental illnesses on a plane increases.

This is not hysteria on my part. Read my previous posts on this thread.

Regarding the D.B. Cooper false equivalency, he acted in a premeditated manner. People with mental illnesses typically act on impulse.

As I said previously, I am not trying to be argumentative, just engaging in critical discourse. I appreciate being challenged in a respectful manner because it forces me to consider points I may not have previously. Please remember that when/of you respond to my posts. Thanks.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

To clarify, I do not think this will be dangerous. Read my post in response to someone asking, "What happens if someone tries to open the door." My response, "They'll be stopped."

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I don't understand this new policy. How can I prove that I'm bored, lonely and depressed which could qualify as possibly mental disorder?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The issue can't be resolved by a simple discount. It is a logistic problem, a supply chain of services. Chip Star is wrong by assuming that there is only one someone who is trying to open the door.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

You have the option to go back to your own country.

Stupid comment. The people here with family DON'T have that option

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

 Chip Star Please remember that when/of you respond to my posts. Thanks.

The 'crazy hysteria' mentioning has nothing to do with what you said. We have people with mental illness who can fly on jets without major problems, as long as the staff know beforehand about some traits and conditions. Something as simple as wind turbulence from the Bay Area can frighten the Kool-Aid from anyone - mentally ill or not. Knowledge and information about these disabilities can make things much easier for everyone aboard. You don't need to strap a bipolar person down.

With all the wars our Armed Forces have been in for the past 17 years straight, more veterans are getting PTSD and that needs to be looked at even more. All these people need help. Often trauma has triggers too and that must be noted. That doesn't mean that the mentally sick are violent - it usually doesn't get that far unless it's been going on for a long time. We have had mentally/emotionally ill people on flights every day and most people don't even know it. It's not really much to worry about. It's the same deal with certain ethnic groups. I've flown on flights with various people, incl. Middle Eastern (Arabic) and India subcontinent people and I was never scared of them. That's the big word here - some people have a problem with people they know nothing about but have been stereotyped on TV because they are scared. I'm not trying to be argumentative with anyone here, either.

There are rules about boarding, at least on American flights. If someone is too drunk or stoned already or is behaving in a suspicious manner that person can be denied a pass. Human sex trafficking/child sex for perverts is a major issue for airlines today and I think that in itself is a bigger problem than mentally ill passengers ever will be. Pervert sex peddlers are scum.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

'Mental disorders'. Then goes on to list epilepsy and autism. What ignorance.

Some of the conditions descibed are physical illnesses, some are mental health illnesses and some are learning dificulties. Labelling them all as 'mental disorders' is disgusting. What year is this?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

ulyssesToday  09:27 am JST

'Mental Disorder' is a very broad term.

If my girlfriend breaks up and I get depressed, should I qualify for a discount?

No, because no psychologist worth their license would ever misdiagnose a temporary mood as a mental disorder. It's not actually a "broad term"- the psychological field even writes whole manuals defining it.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

If I do the above, should I be getting on a plane?

I refer you to katsu78's reply above. Only a professional can properly diagnose any disorder you may or may not have.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Chip Star is wrong by assuming that there is only one someone who is trying to open the door.

I was not assuming anyone is, or will try to open the door.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

let's not lose sight of the fact that the airlines (apparently) are legally bound to do this, and so not necessarily worthy of kudos.... (though please don't jump down my throat, because I'm not passing judgement on the new polciy)

and.... I have to wonder how airlines will confirm eligibility.... not a lot of salient info in the article....

also, as others have touched on, it may well be that some with 'mental disorders', and/or their relatives, might feel somewhat bashful about this....

anyway, tricky all round, and only time will tell.....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Something as simple as wind turbulence from the Bay Area can frighten the Kool-Aid from anyone - mentally ill or not. Knowledge and information about these disabilities can make things much easier for everyone aboard. You don't need to strap a bipolar person down

Agreed.

I've flown on flights with various people, incl. Middle Eastern (Arabic) and India subcontinent people and I was never scared of them. That's the big word here - some people have a problem with people they know nothing about but have been stereotyped on TV because they are scared.

Agreed.

I'm not trying to be argumentative with anyone here, either.

Your posts support this assertion. I definitely appreciate being able to engage in civil critical discourse as it's a rarity online.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It's not actually a "broad term"- the psychological field even writes whole manuals defining it.

Its a broad term when you are offering passengers a discount.

Do you think a suicidal , self-harming person should be encouraged to get on a plane?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I definitely appreciate being able to engage in civil critical discourse as it's a rarity online.

It is especially rare on this site.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Re: aircraft doors

Given that most modern aircraft have plug-in doors, and that the aircraft is pressurised while in flight, I say good luck to anyone trying to open one.

Furthermore, I suspect it's the undiagnosed crazies we have to be concerned about rather than those individuals being medically treated or supervised.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Aly Ruston:

I will gladly change my son's Autism for you full domestic airfare. SMH

You say you have a family, I hope none of them develop any of the mentioned problems.

To everyone wondering: you need to be diagnosed by a specialist, but not only that.... you also need documents from the doctor, the clinic, and the government to be able to apply for the "discount card" and it takes a lot of work and time.

To the people "advocating" for people with disabilities you may know, the airlines are not going to have a Huge banner with a "disabled" sign and an arrow down.... nobody is going to be yelling "here comes the discounted-ticket passenger"

To the other people worried about somebody with a disability opening the door or something like that..... don't worry, because of people like you, families like mine prefer to travel by car...

Insensitivity is very common in this site, but hopefully with the access to information, we can grow as a better society...

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I will gladly change my son's Autism for you full domestic airfare. SMH

That has NOTHING to do with my above comment which is talking about addressing discrimination

But the answer to widespread discrimination is not huge discounts on airfare.

What does a discount have to do with addressing discrimination?!

Excellent point. I'm a foreigner. We suffer discrimination. Where's OUR discount?

The point being that the powers that be are offering discounts INSTEAD OF addressing the discrimination. What we are addressing is the washing of hands by offering discounts INSTEAD OF helping those who are in need. Buying off people so as not to deal with the problem.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A similar discount program has already been introduced by some railway, bus and ferry companies following the enforcement of the 2016 law for eliminating discrimination against people with disabilities.

This is what we are disputing: giving ANYONE a discount will eliminate discrimination against them. This is stupid. This is not to say that we against the notion of giving these people discounts. I'm not. I think its a good thing.

But saying that giving discounts will eliminate discrimination? Well then, we can eliminate discrimination against foreigners by giving them discounts too. But it doesn't work that way.

Anyone else?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

ulyssesToday  12:48 pm JST

It's not actually a "broad term"- the psychological field even writes whole manuals defining it.

Its a broad term when you are offering passengers a discount.

Erm.... nooooo.... that's not how words work. You don't get to pretend a word defined by medical manuals means something different just because you'd really like it to.

Do you think a suicidal , self-harming person should be encouraged to get on a plane?

Absolutely. Unless they have been ruled by experts to be so unable to control their actions that they are an imminent danger to themselves or others that they need to be institutionalized, there is no reason not to let them. Are you so uninformed about mental illness that you think someone who has suicidal thoughts or impulses or who uses self-harm as a coping strategy just constantly acts on them no matter where they are? That's not how it works.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

You don't get to pretend a word defined by medical manuals means something different just because you'd really like it to.

Sometimes you need to understand what words mean before trying to comment based on whatever basic knowledge you have about medical terminology.

Unless they have been ruled by experts to be so unable to control their actions that they are an imminent danger to themselves or others that they need to be institutionalized, there is no reason not to let them.

So how many different types of documents do you think JAL requires so that one can avail of these discounts?

Certificate proving that you have 'Disability' and qualify for a discount.

Certificate proving that you have disability but are not a danger to your fellow beings.

That's not how it works.

I am sure you will enlighten us.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Why should people with mental disorders get a discount?

As a father of a pre-teen daughter who is autistic, I am frightened for her future. My daughter can seem normal about 70% of the day and does well in school when she goes... mostly all A's.. But there are times that she gets all stressed out and her anxieties take over. I wonder what job she can handle a job when she gets to working age, Don't you think people with mental disorders have a harder time find good paying jobs??

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Provided they are properly restrained ,the dangerous ones, for the duration of the entire flight, it won't be a problem.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Vince - The problem is, a whole lotta dangerous people with mental disorders walk among us, undiagnosed.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

How are the Japanese airlines going to check for mental disorders? Will you need a note from a physician or will a note from your employer or an authoritative figure work? I'm sure Halloween will be interesting.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Many people with the above-mentioned mental disorders live on a meager disability pension, so they can't afford to travel by plane without thinking twice, so I welcome the measure.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Thank you for reporting on this recent development which I applaud.

A shift away from segregation to the integration and inclusion of persons with special needs is a defining feature of our postmodern societies. Many reform-minded countries have taken steps to encourage not just tolerance but - acceptance - of our uniqueness as individuals. Such is evidenced by not only token legislative reforms but changes in policies in both the public and private sectors as well as their respective institutions. Already, most airlines offer special fares to customers for a variety of well-considered reasons.

Several of the comments noted above reflect that understanding while others, however, demonstrate that we leaders and educators have yet considerably greater work to do!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I'm glad this is happening. I'm one who has suffered many years with PTSD (Vietnam combat vet, frequent dreams still, etc.), depression, and some severe physiological issues, none of which are externally visible! I've worked very hard all my life to be healthy, and at 70, look very physically fit and healthy. But...but, unfortunately, I'm not. Yes, some of my problems are mental, for whatever reason. Other than my doctors and wife, very few people know how I've suffered. My point is, you cannot tell how a person is getting along by outside appearance. I also know of a person who has a doctoral degree and he has autism. There's this thing called the autism spectrum... Again, point being that psycholigical and other mental disorders are not detected by appearance of a person. I was trained to be very disciplined and dignified. Hard for people to tell I have these issues.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

What a progressive and Inclusive policy to have. Well done Japanese Airlines. Best thing I've heard in ages for disability services.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

For everyone that is complaining about this. They are talking about every day citizen that get on the planes now with their carers but making it a bit more affordable, as they have to buy 2 tickets. It's not like anyone can grab 2 tickets and board, to granted a carer there is a lot of hoops to jump through. Also why is everyone so predudice against mental illness, it's only a minute amount that are violent, most are a threat to themselves. This policy is covers all mental and neurological impairments such as epilepsy and autism, which are most likely what this policy is going to be primarily used for.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Some of the people with the conditions mentioned in the article do pose a threat to civil aviation, 

All people pose a threat. Most of those that melt a fuse onboard were never diagnosed. It's not a bad idea to discount so a carer can be there, get sure medication is taken, the person is in conditions to fly safely, etc.

How are the Japanese airlines going to check for mental disorders?

Disability card. If you have not received it yet, a doctor's letter.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I am sure regular flyers in America will say this was introduced years agi

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Insensitivity is very common in this site, but hopefully with the access to information, we can grow as a better society...

GyGeneSep. 26 10:55 pm JSTI'm glad this is happening. I'm one who has suffered many years with PTSD (Vietnam combat vet, frequent dreams still, etc.), depression, and some severe physiological issues, none of which are externally visible! I've worked very hard all my life to be healthy, and at 70, look very physically fit and healthy. But...but, unfortunately, I'm not. Yes, some of my problems are mental, for whatever reason. Other than my doctors and wife, very few people know how I've suffered. My point is, you cannot tell how a person is getting along by outside appearance. I also know of a person who has a doctoral degree and he has autism. There's this thing called the autism spectrum... Again, point being that psycholigical and other mental disorders are not detected by appearance of a person. I was trained to be very disciplined and dignified. Hard for people to tell I have these issues.

I agree with all this. If the airline crews on these and other conditions like diabetes, epilepsy, etc. then the crew can act and the problem will be resolved with no fuss. The stigma of mental illness can also be erased too because it's not really as bad as many make it out to be.  A little bit know-how can go a long way. That and some common sense.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I'm sure this is going to fly! (sarcasm)

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If one of them freaks out and starts assaulting the cabin crew they'd need to have the means to protect themselves and other passengers. Pepper spray or tasers would be a good idea

Sure. Pepper spray or tasers in the confined space of an aircraft cabin.

What could possibly go wrong?

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Under the new system, the discount fare is also available to a caregiver traveling on the same flight as a person in possession of an official welfare document certifying their condition.

Where does one obtain an 'official welfare document' certifying their condition? I have PTSD as certified by a 'shindansho' written by my psycho therapist physician, will that suffice?

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Where does one obtain an 'official welfare document' certifying their condition? I have PTSD as certified by a 'shindansho' written by my psycho therapist physician, will that suffice?

I am rather surprised by the number of people here who do not know about the Disability Handbook (精神障害福祉手帳). Well, maybe I am not that surprised, as I only found out about it (or bothered to check about it) five years after I come to Japan.

I suffered from depression and schizophrenia. I got a shindansho by my doctor, got an application letter for the Disability Handbook and went to the city ward to apply for it. It has three levels depending on the seriousness of your so-called disability (depends on what your doctor writes). I got level 3, the lowest. With that Disability Handbook in hand, you get tax breaks, 50% ride on buses, and this (the plane tickets).

There is also this 自立支援医療費制度(精神通院医療) which makes your doctor visits and pharmacy visit only 10% of the full fee (instead of the usual 30%).

I would encourage those eligible to apply for it. It helps me a lot because even though I have a full-time job, the costly visits to the hospitals and my medication was so much, I was glad the government tried to help in some small ways

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My apologies, my first time posting. I made a mistake. The second paragraph onwards is my comment, not the quote

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