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Japanese destroyers start drill with U.S. carrier Carl Vinson

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excellent reporting

1 ( +2 / -1 )

That was very Quick

1 ( +1 / -0 )

War mongering, alive and well. I guess bush and his ilk taught us nothing.

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

War mongering, alive and well....

Pacifist Japan needs a bit of such thing to survive.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

War mongering, alive and well. I guess bush and his ilk taught us nothing.

So what do you suggest be done about NK? Keep on talking? More sanctions? My bad, neither have worked now for at least a generation, and they continue to develop nukes?

Well?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

More sanctions? Sanctions are like laws in the USA and maybe in Japan. They only work if businesses, banks, etc that are sanctioned by the USA government stop doing whatever the sanction is supposed to stop. If the Koreans living in Japan and the SKs would stop sending money to aid the relatives, then the sanction works. Maybe the money isn't flowing to NK, so this posting is wrong. One can only believe what is in the media.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Yubaru,So what do you suggest be done about NK? Keep on talking? More sanctions? My bad, neither have worked now for at least a generation, and they continue to develop nukes?

And do you know why they are the way they are...below from washington post.

The story dates to the early 1950s, when the U.S. Air Force, in response to the North Korean invasion that started the Korean War, bombed and napalmed cities, towns and villages across the North. It was mostly easy pickings for the Air Force, whose B-29s faced little or no opposition on many missions.

The bombing was long, leisurely and merciless, even by the assessment of America’s own leaders. “Over a period of three years or so, we killed off — what — 20 percent of the population,” Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, told the Office of Air Force History in 1984.Dean Rusk, a supporter of the war and later secretary of state, said the United States bombed “everything that moved in North Korea, every brick standing on top of another.”

After running low on urban targets, U.S. bombers destroyed hydroelectric and irrigation dams in the later stages of the war, flooding farmland and destroying crops.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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