A man cleans debris in the aftermath of Typhoon Hagibis in Date City, Fukushima Prefecture, on Wednesday. Photo: REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
national

Flood disaster frays resilience of elderly victims

7 Comments
By Tim Kelly

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Heard a heart-wrenching story of an elderly couple whose house was flooded with mud. The wife woken when water reached her futon. She woke her husband, but he can barely stand and requires holding on to something. She managed to get up, but could not help him. She had to watch him get slowly buried under the mud and just before his face was covered, he said, "Thanks for everything." The wife made it, but only just barely.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

the government has the responsibility to protect citizen.

japan has always been a typhoon passage. where is the disaster prevention???

by the way , it seems that foreigner are not welcome in shelter . Why???

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I actually really appreciated this article, because it actually highlights a real dilemma that Japan will increasingly struggle with in the coming decades.

So many of these rural / semi-rural communities are already nearing the breaking point in terms of the provision of social services for ordinary day-to-day life.

There is a dearth of young adults and even middle aged adults. Which means that the population of people that can assist, even in ordinary day-to-day matters, is limited.

What saddens me that, in the future, when natural disasters like this happen, it is going to be the elderly in rural / semi-rural communities that are going to be most at risk.

And the only way for this risk to be mitigated is for the central government to recognize it and recognize the need for rapid deployment forces to go to communities that are most at risk.

Surely the PM's emergency response function can make this happen!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The first picture shows how that person is a brave guy fighting for everyday life and the most in this moment of aftermath flood disaster to have a normal life back again. A right picture focusing a right person...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

We had a big earthquake in my neighbourhood and many homes ended up being demolished. The gomi rules now mean that all debris has to be sorted for disposal. This job was done exclusively by immigrant labour hired by whoever the subcontractor was. The workers I talked to were Chinese. All of the gomi in the photo with this article will similarly need to be sorted.

There is only so much volunteers can do, so if the deployment force zones2surf describes is to be set up, I guess immigrant labour is the most likely way. It would be good for the government to do it itself and not just pay extra for layer upon layer of subcontracting.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The thought of having lived a full life and then waking up in your own room to find yourself drowning in cold muddy water fills me with horror.

So many of the deaths were elderly people sleeping on the ground floor.

Then many who escaped lost everything...

5 ( +5 / -0 )

So many of these rural / semi-rural communities are already nearing the breaking point in terms of the provision of social services for ordinary day-to-day life.

[...]

And the only way for this risk to be mitigated is for the central government to recognize it and recognize the need for rapid deployment forces to go to communities that are most at risk.

Kick out some company and administration out of major city, Tokyo to begin with, to redinamize smaller ones. Thanks to bullet train and helicopter (in emergency situation), all ministry do not need to be in Tokyo and that is dangerous since if a major disaster hit Tokyo the country could end up with the whole government (and high level civil servant) in no state to rule (not commenting if they are good at it or not).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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