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Japanese journalist happy after 3-year hostage ordeal ends in Syria

28 Comments
By Mari Yamaguchi

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28 Comments
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Doesn't look to happy in the picture. He looks more like a guy getting carted off to incarceration than freedom!

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Oh and he and we too had better get ready for the crush of "news" about him and his ordeal on all the wide shows. Not to mention he is going to get offers from all media outlets here in Japan, and probably other countries as well, to be interviewed about it too.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

A biggest question people may ask him is: "Are you going back to the war zone?"

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I bet he is! All the money he's going to get from the interviews, tv appearances etc. could even make the three years worth it

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

I have no sympathy at all for guys like this he knew what he was getting into.

-5 ( +7 / -12 )

maybe think twice before poking your camera around in a war zone

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

Police best keep a stern eye on him.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Doesn't look to happy in the picture. He looks more like a guy getting carted off to incarceration than freedom!

Pictures are always misleading. It has been days since his release, and I am sure he has run through the gamut of facial expressions since then, from silly grins to to tears to smirks. His slouch and expression are of the moment, he might be digging in his hand luggage when he looks up and notices a camera pointed at him.

This picture was probably the only one they were able to get, but media constantly misleads by snapping pictures of people smiling at funerals (as people do), or celebrity couples making dour faces for a moment (maybe they just dropped their keys). I could take a picture of you on the happiest day of your life during the moment you mimic a frown after somebody makes a bad joke, or a photo on the worst day of your life when you crack a smile at a black joke, or smile at someone who just held a door for you.

Can't imagine what's going through his mind after 3 years in captivity, knowing he us headed back to his family in Japan. Probably going through a mixture of elation, disorientation, fear and anticipation. Or he may just be trying to tie his shoe.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

When he returns he will be locked up and interogated by a number of countries 24 hours a day.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Govt could've at least got him first class. Coach is warzone lite.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

GoodlucktoyouToday  08:18 am JST

When he returns he will be locked up and interogated by a number of countries 24 hours a day.

Returns to Japan? Why on earth would you presume that will happen?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I felt disgusted seeing Japanese media interrogating him at his plane seat on the morning news. He surely might have PTSD or some other mental trauma and should talk to doctors first.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I have no sympathy at all for guys like this he knew what he was getting into.

maybe think twice before poking your camera around in a war zone

That didn't take long at all. Who else is going to report what is going on there?

Yeah he knew what he was getting into, so people like you can actually find out what is happening in places that no one wants to go to. Where do you think that news from war zones comes from? Dudes like this that have the courage to put their lives on the line armed with nothing but a camera to make sure the truth gets out without a government filter applied to it. I applaud him.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

I’m very happy that Yasuda has been freed and is apparently in good physical condition.

On the news they showed a sheet of answers he’d written in English to questions provided by his wife to someone negotiating for his release to help establish his identity. Questions that only he could answer such as where did they meet, where did he purchase his office chair, etc. To the question about his favorite liquor brand, he wrote several names, only the first of which was an actual brand name. The others were coded messages that would appear to be brand names to his captors but were instructing her to refuse to pay any ransom (using the Japanese readings of numerals) and to reassure her he would return safely (i.e. “Bujifrog” which used a pun involving the Japanese for frog, kaeru, which sounds the same as the word for return, with buji meaning safely). Very clever and intelligent of him.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Where do you think that news from war zones comes from? 

Why, certainly the CIA and Pentagon will tell us all we need to know!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm not sure why people are lamenting that we'll be seeing him on the news and hearing his stories nonstop, I'm sure he has a lot of of interesting things to say which is far more valuable then the typical crap on the talk shows.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

commanteer:

Dudes like this that have the courage to put their lives on the line armed with nothing but a camera to make sure the truth gets out without a government filter applied to it. I applaud him.

Agree absolutely. I'm appalled at the lack of sympathy and understanding for Yasuda shown by some of the commenters on this page, and the lack of respect for what he does.

Poor guy looks like he's been through hell, is what I think he looks like.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Whoops, sorry, last comment should have been for extanker.

But I like commanteer's comments also.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I hope the Po-Pos keep an eye on him. It wouldn't surprise me if I learnt that he had been turned.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Michael JacksonToday  07:24 am JST

I have no sympathy at all for guys like this he knew what he was getting into

It is because of guys like him that we have the news.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I'm sure he's been through a lot. My guess that he's happy to get home, but at the same time, tired.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

he is going to get offers from all media outlets here in Japan, and probably other countries as well, to be interviewed about it too.

If it were up to me, I wouldn't give interviews to the weird and nerdy looking talento. Just the main and to the point media.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It is because of guys like him that we have the news.

1 Rule of journalism:

You're supposed to report the news, not be it.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Who released him and how much money they got from him?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

How about a post that says...Thankfully he is going home...Breathing...and with his HEAD!!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

1 Rule of journalism: You're supposed to report the news, not be it.

No that is not the rule of journalism. Global journalism is to investigate both sides of the story in a fair and unbiased view. The fact that this fellow is still alive and released tells me he convinced the other side about the importance of global journalism!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Who has paid huge ransom money to secure release of Jumpei Yasuda ?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

That was his second time to be kidnapped and held hostage in the Middle East.

"There was a time when he was not allowed to bathe for eight months"

Talk about being degraded...

Glad he has been released and able to return home in one piece, physically at least.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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