Photo: Pakutaso
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Japanese woman finds wallet with ¥1 mil, does right thing, then something even better

105 Comments
By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

A lot of passengers on the last train of the night are too tired to notice much of their surroundings, but not Japanese Twitter user Mikan (@mikakawa1). After she plopped herself down on a seat, she noticed there was something under her foot, and it turned out to be a wallet.

Since there was no one else in the train car, the owner must have dropped it when they got off at a previous station. Mikan picked it up to check its contents, and found money inside, which, of course, isn’t unusual. What was unusual, though, was how much money was in it, and after counting all the bills, it came to a cool one million yen.

Figuring that one million yen is an amount of money most people would want back, Mikan decided to take the wallet to the lost and found when she got off at her station. Unfortunately, because of the late hour, there was no attendant at the automated ticket gate. Her next plan was to hand the wallet off to a police officer, but she didn’t see any in the immediate vicinity either.

However, along with the cash the wallet contained a driver’s license with a home address written on it. After a quick call to the phone company’s information service, Mikan had the owner’s home phone number, and so she called them up and explained what had happened. “You found my wallet?” asked the owner through tears of relief, unable to believe how lucky they’d been.

In Japan, it’s not unusual for people to take the train to work or into the big city but still own a car that they use for other outings, and that’s the case for Mikan. Now that she’d made contact with the owner, she got in her car and drove over to their house to return it. The owner, extremely grateful for Mikan’s honesty and kindness, wanted to give her a portion of the money as a thank-you, and insisted she accept 300,000 yen.

Mikan agreed, and the two said good-bye, but that’s not where the story ends. While she was grateful for the generous offer, she hadn’t returned the wallet, and all of the money it had contained, because she wanted a reward, but because it was the right thing to do. So after the owner had closed the door to the house, Mikan pulled out a pen and a piece of paper, wrote “Your appreciation is reward enough,” and left both the note and the 300,000 yen in the owner’s mailbox.

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In addition to the owner’s thanks, Mikan has also earned a round of applause from other Twitter users, who have reacted with:

“So much respect for you.”

“They offered you 300,000 yen as a reward? That would have made my head spin.”

“Both you and the owner are people of outstanding character.”

“A long time ago, I lost a wallet that someone had given me as a present, and I was so happy when a high school student found it and turned it in.”

You could make the argument, and Mikan herself likely would too, that there’s nothing extraordinary about making sure something that doesn’t belong to you gets back to its rightful owner. That much money, though, is a temptation not everyone would be able to resist, and it only would have taken one less honest person to ruin the owner’s day. Then again, in this case it also only took one honest person to cause tears of joy, and Mikan’s story is an example that there’s a surprising amount of good we can do just by keeping our eyes open and our hearts kind.

Source: Twitter/@mikakawa1 via Jin

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© SoraNews24

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

105 Comments
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If a foreigner return lost item to koban they'll be interrogated for almost one hour while they'll be asking to fill many form of papers. Lucky enough if they don't accuse you stole that in the beginning.

13 ( +42 / -29 )

the wallet owner is a nut job. Firstly, you’ve gotta be some weirdo to be carrying around exactly one million yen in a wallet. And even weirder to lose it. Finally , to offer up 300,000 yen as a reward is also really weird.

so we have a saint and a weirdo here.

-26 ( +20 / -46 )

The chances of that happening in the US is exactly 0.

12 ( +31 / -19 )

Once I did take a left bag with bank books to the Koban. Never again. I was not interrogated but it did take a couple of hours of form filling. A reward of 15% is usual unless you decline which I did.

26 ( +34 / -8 )

Many years ago as a child out shopping with my mother I found a lady's wallet...it must have had her name and address in there, so my mother phoned her. There was a lot of money in it (2 weeks wages as she had just been paid) and I can still remember here relief when she came and got the purse from us. I was happy with the reward she gave me.

23 ( +27 / -4 )

A couple of years ago my wife found about ¥70万 in an envelope at a bank machine.

She also turned it in to the police and the owner was ultra grateful. She was rewarded as well and tried to refuse but the owner insisted.

25 ( +26 / -1 )

Seems like Mikan has some self-esteem issues. I returned a lost wallet recently. But I didn’t seek out public praise afterward by posting all over Twitter about what a great a person I am for my action. (Moreover, there are absolutely no sources confirming the veracity of this story.)

8 ( +29 / -21 )

the wallet owner is a nut job. Firstly, you’ve gotta be some weirdo to be carrying around exactly one million yen in a wallet. And even weirder to lose it. Finally , to offer up 300,000 yen as a reward is also really weird.so we have a saint and a weirdo here.

I don't think that this story is unusual for Nihonjin or at least for those I know and have known because the "what if it were me" sense and the accompanying altruism seem very strong in Japan albeit the refusal of the 'reward' may describe an added depth of character. Mostly, I suspect, it is from a very healthy sense of SELF-RESPECT which Nihonjin are blessed with . But, as we see, NOT everyone living in Japan is so fortunate to have the same sense of self respect nor altruism which would call such a behavior 'saintly' when most reading it would just be happy to know that there are other people like themselves in this sometimes overwhelmingly cynical world...

8 ( +17 / -9 )

But, what kind of lunatic loses his wallet with a million yen it?

-9 ( +11 / -20 )

Moving forward and ‘focusing on the positive’, seems that was an equally virtuous thing to do:

*- @zichi 7:02am: “Once I did take a left bag with bank books to the Koban. Never again. I was not interrogated but it did take a couple of hours of form filling. A reward of 15% is usual unless you decline which I did.” -*

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

Certain things in Japan require cash payment. Carrying around very large sums of cash is not uncommon at all.

for those who are astonished at this, your judgment is misplaced and should be against the organizations who require it and not the customers who carry the cash.

I put it up there with companies that still require the use of fax machines…

15 ( +21 / -6 )

snowymountainhell

Moving forward

Forward from what?

and ‘focusing on the positive’,

What are you talking about?

seems that was an equally virtuous thing to do:

I would not consider it virtuous to hand in a lost bag or wallet. Just what normal people do.

10 ( +14 / -4 )

I would not consider it virtuous to hand in a lost bag or wallet. Just what normal people do.

I disagree and think that it is virtuous. But the moment that you brag about it, it would not be.

I do also think that it is something that normal people “should” do.

7 ( +14 / -7 )

I've lost my wallet twice in 25 years in Japan. Both times I had around 30,000yen in it. Someone turned the wallet in to the police, but the 30,000yen was gone. They did leave the yen coins in the wallet along with the credit cards, bank cards, and ID. I have no problem losing the cash because it's too troublesome to get those cards again.

18 ( +19 / -1 )

Japanese people really are the most amazing people in the world. I wish everyone could learn from this and be more like the Japanese

-17 ( +14 / -31 )

Well done Mikan. Gotta love Japan!

-15 ( +9 / -24 )

I found a wallet full of money and credit card, on a street, I returned the money to someone, too locate the owner, finding money not in a wallet is a different thing

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Man, I would have buried it in my garden for a year, then used it to pay off some debts.

-11 ( +14 / -25 )

As it is a hassle to return the wallet to a police booth as I have experienced, now, If I find one, I drop it in a mail box & let JPost take care of it.

16 ( +20 / -4 )

Japanese children often learn moral things home/in school such as "Think if you were his/her situation and Don't trouble people" She must sympathetically have thought of the person who lost that money. That's why she returned that all money to the person. This kind of things happen sometimes in Japan.

-7 ( +6 / -13 )

good for you....although I definitely would've taken the 300k :D

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

When I returned objects left in the train, the station master did not ask anything. I just told him which train it was in, and that’s it

11 ( +12 / -1 )

good for you....although I definitely would've taken the 300k :D

Why? Its not yours.

Do you not believe in being part of a community and doing the right thing?

2 ( +14 / -12 )

Why? Its not yours. Do you not believe in being part of a community and doing the right thing?

It is when the owner gives it to me.....I did do the right thing, I handed back 1 million. The owner wants to give me 300k? Great

9 ( +10 / -1 )

> runner3Today  07:01 am JST

The chances of that happening in the US is exactly 0.

Of course, it happens all the time, you just don't read about it in the news.

Humans are mostly very kind and good no matter where you go in the world.

18 ( +24 / -6 )

the wallet owner is a nut job.

I share this sentiment, but personally, I think the subject of the story, Mikan, is the fruit.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

It's a good story and has a happy ending. Glad for both side.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Very believable story in Japan. I have fond memories of the Honesty of the public in regard to returning lost property. Sadly a little lacking in many western countries these days but there are still plenty of honest people around

3 ( +10 / -7 )

Have turned in two wallets and three phones to kobans. I tell them where I found it and leave. Don’t want to fill out forms and do not want rewards.

10 ( +14 / -4 )

Letsberealistic, name me just one time.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

I once found a couple of passports, US and South Korean, in a bag with, a moderate amount of cash and a small wallet containing credit and debit cards.

Turned it in to the local police station, took about maybe 10 minutes to tell the the details of where, and how I found it, filled out the forms, refused the "finder's fee" and went on my way.

It's just the right thing to do!

9 ( +12 / -3 )

Perhaps this is why Japanese People are welcome in most parts of the World but others who shall not be named are not...

-8 ( +8 / -16 )

Why? Its not yours.

If the someone decides to give you a present of money, for no matter the situation, it's definitely yours to keep.

I suppose if someone gives you a present of money for your birthday, or whatever occasion, you are going to say the same thing! The money was given in good faith, accepted, and them returned.

It's also up to you to decide what to do with it.

Upon accepting the money, it was hers, and it was her choice what to do with it as well.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

William BjornsonToday  09:15 am JST

Perhaps this is why Japanese People are welcome in most parts of the World but others who shall not be named are not...

Why are they 'accepted' again?

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Good story. I understand it is a crime in Japan to keep such found items.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

> runner3Today  09:12 am JST

Letsberealistic, name me just one time.

Please.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

I would never refuse the reward unless it looked like it was coming from someone struggling.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

If I found a wallet, the last place I'd go would be to the police. After the hassle they gave me when I handed in a driving licence I'd found, I daren't think of what they'd do if it was a million yen!

4 ( +8 / -4 )

I once found a couple of passports, US and South Korean, in a bag with, a moderate amount of cash and a small wallet containing credit and debit cards.

What are you? CIA?

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

I definitely would have done exactly as she had, except probably kept the 300K reward (at first insisting it is too much, but if pressed to take it). I've found at least 10 wallets or coin purses since I've been here, and twice just found bills lying on the ground (one 5000, one 10,000), and turned every one in despite the process that comes afterward, and yes, on two occasions being suspected of perhaps taking it. Each time I was asked if I wanted the receiver to know who found and turned it in, I said no. A couple of times I was asked if I wanted the receiver to know it was a foreigner who found and turned it in, I asked, "Why would that matter? No." And each time I said I did not expect nor want any reward.

Only once did I ever call the police to ask if the item had been claimed and they said that yes, the person had come the next day and gotten it back, and was thankful.

I once also lost my wallet after an enkai, with my "gaijin card" and more in it, and about ¥8000 cash. Went to police the next day and someone had handed it in. Money was gone, which was disappointing, but no biggie. Was thankful it was found.

This is not just a Japanese thing, and people everywhere do it. Granted, in a country with a poorer lower class, the "finders keepers" rule might apply a little more, but I know people here, too, who don't return things the find, or if they do, flat out declare they expect a reward or will never be the good Samaritan again. I try to see it as others have posted above; what if it were me? That person probably is panicking now, and I want to help. That's all. It's not a Japanese trait, it is the better part of human nature.

8 ( +13 / -5 )

It's a crime to keep found property. If you turn it in at the Koban and no one claims it after six months it becomes your property. If a large sum is involved then the 15% reward will cover you for your troubles.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

SanjinosebleedToday  09:06 am JST

Very believable story in Japan. I have fond memories of the Honesty of the public in regard to returning lost property. Sadly a little lacking in many western countries these days but there are still plenty of honest people around

People often project 'honesty' onto Japanese for a variety of reasons, but from what I saw living in Japan for 15 years and living in various western nations, (NZ, AU, UK) there is nothing between them to say one culture is more honest than another.

Humans are honest and kind by nature no matter where they are, at least that's what I project. :)

16 ( +18 / -2 )

We need more news like this. Nice heartwarming story Japan Today. :)

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Maybe I would tell myself that this wallet probably belongs to a 1%er, and a million yen is just pocket change to him/her. So maybe I'd just keep it.

-11 ( +1 / -12 )

Japanese people really are the most amazing people in the world.

My smartphone fell out of my pocket while in a taxi. The car was long gone by the time I discovered this. Outside my hotel were several cab drivers. I told one of them, but I had no information about the driver, but this guy promised to track down one of his colleagues.

Next day, the driver appears in the lobby with my smartphone. I offer him reward, he refuses. This was in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, where the cab drivers tend to be working class and poorly paid.

Malaysians really are the most amazing people in the world.

14 ( +16 / -2 )

If you a foreigner and hand over a lost wallet full of money to a koban the police keep the money and return the wallet to the rightful owner! The police are not the same when it’s someone Japanese returning something—I know this because I later met the person who lost something I found and I’ll never do that again! In fact, i looked like a thief…Middle up to the middle man!

5 ( +9 / -4 )

I mean yeah 1 million yen could fit in a wallet, but be realistic, its pretty thick. Don't wanna sit down on that wallet, it would mess up your back.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I can't believe she went on Twitter to signal how virtuous she is. It's so immodest and crass.

8 ( +16 / -8 )

I can't believe she went on Twitter to signal how virtuous she is. It's so immodest and crass.

I'd do it to - if you don't get the million yen, you at least get praise for giving it back. Doesn't cost anyone anything, and she actually did do something good.

But yeah, be angry at her, because that makes sense.

-4 ( +8 / -12 )

Never had a problem handing items to the police in Japan.

They fill in the form with the pertinent information-simple really…

3 ( +6 / -3 )

She's rich.

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

If a foreigner return lost item to koban they'll be interrogated for almost one hour while they'll be asking to fill many form of papers. Lucky enough if they don't accuse you stole that in the beginning.

Oh come on, is this just you trying to make up stuff or

I have returned wallets, house keys, car keys/fabs, etc... No different treatment than anyone else same as my Japanese wife when she has done the same.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Found a few wallets in train and gave them at the station personal where I got off. Always went away before they could dish our the forms. Amounts were peanuts.

In the neighborhood I guess there are lots of joggers as on Saturday and Sunday mornings I happen to find a lot of smartphones on the ground. Sorry, but I just put them on a wall or something for the owner to find them when walking back his way. (I found a lot of these and frankly have better things than running each time an errand to the Koban which is not exactly close by...)

I also occasionally go to take a copy at a convenience store and am never disappointed. Copies, originals, prints or pretty much everything, you name it. As far as originals go: one passport, several bank books, tons of juminhyo and koseki tohon, one set of divorce papers (only one sign lol), photos (mostly family pics but one set of kinky ones did stand out with the cash register girl went scarlet when I gave them to her LOL) and not later than last week did I find the original of a 2-shot COVID vaccination certificate. The convenience staff get everything, I want nothing to do with that.

On 2 occasions did I go to a Koban to report I picked up...a cat (you have to know that cats are to be reported as "lost property"). One because I had reasons to believe she had been abandoned (nobody claimed her and a friend took her in) and one with a serious case of cancer in her mouth (her owner was so happy to get her back and told me she passed away at home 2 months later). In the second case, I refused any reward but the owner literally put a 10,000 JPY bill in the pocket of my jacket when I went to give her the cat and was given a cup to tea. I used the money for our stray cat volunteer work.

Essentially, I have not problem handing in the stuff, just don't want the paperwork or reward for that matters.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

I have returned wallets, house keys, car keys/fabs, etc... No different treatment than anyone else same as my Japanese wife when she has done the same.

I agree. I've turned in wallets and the like, and didn't have to do anything more than the standard paperwork.

I also forgot my bag on a bench one day, and had to go pick it up at the koban. It was easy enough.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

If a foreigner return lost item to koban they'll be interrogated for almost one hour while they'll be asking to fill many form of papers.

This is untrue, based on personal experience. It only took a few minutes and the paperwork I filled out allowed me to keep the 20,000 yen I found after it was unclaimed.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Lost my wallet once containing 40,000 yen a debit card, work id card, and a debit card. Got an email from my work place the next day informing to go to the police to pick up my wallet. It was sans money. Also found 3,000 yen on the street and a japanese guy saw me pick me up and he marched me to the nearest koban box and he made me hand it in. I had to fill out a form and refused the money if not claimed within 6-months. I have subsequently seen wallets left on trains and just ignored them, as there were others on the train, lest be thought a thief.

15 ( +16 / -1 )

Does 100 bills fit in a wallet ??

and if so this is so heavy you will know if you lost it..

very strange story ????????????

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

She’s a real saint! Or bored..or both

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Does 100 bills fit in a wallet ??

It would fit in one of those long, carry-wallets that Japanese dudes sometimes... carry.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

If a foreigner return lost item to koban they'll be interrogated for almost one hour while they'll be asking to fill many form of papers.

Yep, found an open unmarked envelope on the ground with a wad of 10,000yen bills on my way to work. Knowing the the process it would take to take it to the police and possibly missing much work time, I didn't touch it and left it there. The 1000yen bill I found years ago on the riverside though, I kept. Sue me!

3 ( +8 / -5 )

I can't believe she went on Twitter to signal how virtuous she is. It's so immodest and crass.

Moreover, just minutes after this article about her Tweets was posted this morning, she was retweeting it.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Maybe I would tell myself that this wallet probably belongs to a 1%er,

On pubic transport? Ya think?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

In pre-social media days, an unsubstantiated personal story like this would not have been made into a news article.

So I wonder why these days, when someone writes something on social media, it is sometimes reported as gospel truth even without evidence that it actually happened. Surely we all know that anyone can write anything they like on Twitter, including things they have made up?

Why publish it in an article that assumes the story is 100% true? I'm not sure that is good journalistic practice. How can we distinguish truth and fiction in news if news organizations simply regurgitate unsubstantiated claims which the writer may be posting to boost their social media account following?

Realistically, absent journalistic research, surely there is no way to confirm that this tale actually happened.

There are no specific names or places or train lines mentioned in the story. Even the poster "mikan" is anonymous. So what possible steps can you take to confirm the story is true before publishing it? Relaying anonymous accounts pollutes the field of online information and muddies the ground between truth and reality. How can you vouch for content lacking detail in this way?

The story reads like an entry in a "write a story in a single tweet" competition. Admittedly, the tweet is very well put together and packs a lot into 140 characters. It's pretty skillful writing, even it may well be fiction.

We simply cannot tell if this is true or not and the article should acknowledge that.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

@Fighto!Today 08:43 am JST

Why? Its not yours.

From a commentary concerning similar provisions:

The right to remuneration is a special subjective right arising in the legal relationship between the person who found the thing and the person who lost it. The basis for the emergence of this right is the factual composition, which includes the very fact of the discovery of the thing (find), the fulfillment of the duties of the finder, as well as the return of the thing to the person entitled to receive it. As already noted, the right to a reward does not arise if the finder of the thing did not declare the find or tried to conceal it.

Does that help?

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

I can't believe she went on Twitter to signal how virtuous she is. It's so immodest and crass.

I'd do it to - if you don't get the million yen, you at least get praise for giving it back. Doesn't cost anyone anything, and she actually did do something good.

You want to be praised for doing something a normal person should do?

Wow. What a world we live in now.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Seems like a bs story. I once had 400,000¥ in a big long wallet in order to pay my taxes, and let me tell you, could barely fitt inside all those 10k bills. No way 1 million could fitt into one. And she had to brag on social media. Common!

6 ( +12 / -6 )

@eurodude

Seems like a bs story

I just looked up the writer's twitter bio.

She writes "all my tweets are non-fiction". "Sometimes the truth is stranger than a novel".

Must be true then mate, she said so!

11 ( +11 / -0 )

OK, please someone calculates how tick is 1M is cash.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Got my answer, a bill is roughly 0.1 mm, so I assume the thinnest is 1cm. Doable in a wallet but seems tough to fold.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Finally a pleasant story with a happy ending .

What a nice lady

0 ( +3 / -3 )

What are you? CIA?

No it was in a public parking lot near the airport!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I lost my wallet here in Japan 3 times (yeah I know hahaha). Every time it comes back to me intact. First I left it in the UR office (with ~500k yen inside), the office called me the next day. Next I left it in Ichiran ramen shop, the waiter set it aside. Then I dropped it while entering the car at a convenience store parking, few hours later the police called. This is one of the best thing in Japan. Now I don't bring the usual wallet anymore and take advantage of digital payment.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Seems like a bs story. I once had 400,000¥ in a big long wallet in order to pay my taxes, and let me tell you, could barely fitt inside all those 10k bills. No way 1 million could fitt into one. And she had to brag on social media. Common!

Depends on the wallet. If you're wallet is not the folding type. Then it will fit. I just withdraw 1million yen and manage to put it all in the wallet. Although it is already too bulky, and way pass the limit.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Everyone here seems to have loads of cash on their hands.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

runner3Today  07:01 am JST

The chances of that happening in the US is exactly 0.

W R O N G! You don't know he U.S. or Japan.

https://edition.cnn.com/2016/07/05/us/boston-taxi-driver-finds-and-returns-cash-trnd/index.html

2 ( +5 / -3 )

handed in a wallet that was on the floor at kichijoji station on a busy night. koban cops opened it and it had no notes in it, but everything else was there. didnt have to fill out anything. it was peak evening time and the place was bustling so maybe they didnt have time--i didnt either.

dropped my phone in a ski gondola in hokkaido....called it up half an hour later and the lady at the ticket desk answered, someone had handed it in. very grateful.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Kindness is priceless.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

£6500 in a wallet? wow, and they got it back! that is honesty at its best, some people are not driven by money or greed, this person who returned the wallet could have quite easily put it in there pocket and had a good time with it, but no they returned it and the reward. I have 100% respect for them.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

This woman did the person a huge favor by returning the wallet herself. Having lost my wallet and cellphone in Japan before, its a major ordeal trying to locate it. Police tend to wait until YOU call in asking for it which sometimes takes a few days, especially on a weekend. Then, you have to fill out a few different forms and take time off work. Maybe even cancel a few credit cards in the process.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@Brian WhewayToday  03:25 pm JST

Respectfully, I am curious why you would take this story at face value.

It was posted on Twitter by an anonymous use with a made-up handle name. The story does not mention a date, a time, a train line or even a city. Although (for whatever reason) it has become the basis of a news article, it is completely impossible to verify from the information we've been given.

I am not sure why we have such a low bar for believing that someone voluntarily gave up nearly 3000 dollars - money which the owner was encouraging them to take - by walking away from the interaction with the money and then deciding to put the money unsecured in a mailbox.

Life is not a movie.

If someone - particularly someone anonymous - is going to post online fantastic stories (particularly stories that do not even mention the city they took place in or any other verifiable details) then, as the saying goes, "pictures or it didn't happen".

I wish, on those rare occasions when I need someone to believe a tall tale, everyone were just as credulous as the readers of this board.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Euro DudeToday  01:04 pm JST

Seems like a bs story. I once had 400,000¥ in a big long wallet in order to pay my taxes, and let me tell you, could barely fitt inside all those 10k bills. No way 1 million could fitt into one. And she had to brag on social media. Common!

What are you talking about! Did you check his wallet yourself? As owner distribution business in japan i usually carry over 1 million to 2 million with no issue inside special pouch wallet which i use daily but with many distraction at the market am myself include can sometime forget about the wallet my colleague always remind me.I dont see anything wrong about this story.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

@David Brent

Man, I would have buried it in my garden for a year, then used it to pay off some debts.

Lol… you’ve said what many were thinking of doing themselves but didn’t want to say it!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Trying not to be a cynic here.... but... the good samaritan is the one posting about this on twitter? If it had been the person who lost the wallet recounting the tale that would make a lot of sense and be believable. But the person who did the good deed bragging about their actions.... Seems odd. Could be someone looking for a little attention.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

I lost my wallet a couple of years ago in Osaka with about 120,000 yen inside. I had just picked up baby-present money from my folks from western union. This being Japan, I was sure I would get it right back. No such luck.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

A paltry million yen are incommensurable with the riches of a good heart. The lucky lady found something more important than a fat wad of cash: the wisdom to do the right thing in living her life.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

There's honest and dishonest people in all countries. It just depends on the person who finds the money. I have been in situation where I saw a women pull money out of her pocket and a fold $100 bill fell out she kept going I picked it up and walked into the store to give it to her. She had no idea she dropped it. I kindly tapped her on the shoulder and said you dropped this. She looked at me as if to say yes, not knowing she dropped it all she knew was she was being given the opportunity to get money that she thought didn't belong to her. Instead of shopping for what she went into the store to get she hurried out, I guess thinking she got more than what she wanted.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Very happy that there are still kind and honest people.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Letsberealistic, I told you!

@David Brent

Man, I would have buried it in my garden for a year, then used it to pay off some debts.

Lol… you’ve said what many were thinking of doing themselves but didn’t want to say it!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

If she returned the money out of unconditional love and kindness then she wouldn't need to announce her actions or receive recognition.

Clearly returning the money wasn't enough.

The reward was to make her look good.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Good for both of them, we need more like them for sure, and there are many.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

OK, please someone calculates how tick is 1M is cash.

That wallet is not a regular folding wallet. That must be a long wide thick wallet that some business people are carrying personally. It looks like a case wallet.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

My wife caught my father in law carrying the same amount around in his little fishing village thought it gave him status.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

It would be nice to see an official recognition of her honesty. Japan is so fortunate to be, generally speaking, a very honest society. That is a huge asset.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

While it routinely appears this author’s intent is always to depict current Japan in the most positive manner, we must keep in mind, he routinely & selectively gleans most his stories from his Twitter “bubble”.

From reading some of these comments, it appears most were also, NOT necessarily interested in a reward either (nor accolades) but just attempting to do what was legally, ethically & morally “right” in their current country of residence. As a result, may have felt under undue scrutiny, or extraneous inconvenience.

*- @zichi Oct.19 7:02am: “Once I did take a left bag with bank books to the Koban. Never again …”*

*- @Asiaman7 Oct. 19 7:17am: “I returned a lost wallet recently. But I didn’t seek out public praise afterward by posting all over Twitter about what a great a person I am for my action. (Moreover, there are absolutely no sources confirming the veracity of this story.)” *

*@Asiaman7 12:17pm **“Moreover, just minutes after this article about her Tweets was posted this morning, she was retweeting it.*

Perhaps this editor will now consider the counterbalance of feedback from some of JT’s ‘in-country’ readers, that may have had ‘a less than favorable experience’ dealing with police, paperwork, etc to deliver found property? Their accounts may not warrant the “National” section but may be interesting to read of a weekend “Have Your Say”?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

sakurasuki

If a foreigner return lost item to koban they'll be interrogated for almost one hour while they'll be asking to fill many form of papers. Lucky enough if they don't accuse you stole that in the beginning.

Are you sure? Yesterday night I picked up a smartphone that some drunkard had dropped on the street and took it to the koban at Shinjuku station. They asked if I wanted to give my name so that the owner can say thank you, and I declined. Said goodby and left. That was it. Where did your hour long interrogation happen?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

kwatt

That wallet is not a regular folding wallet. That must be a long wide thick wallet that some business people are carrying personally. It looks like a case wallet.

Agree. You can not stuff a 1 mio yen brick into a folding wallet.

What keeps to amaze me is that some guys carry their wallets in their back pocket, which is the easiest place to get lost or stolen.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Went to a casino with a police friend, and he was amazed that I turned in a wallet that I found in the bar. Years later, I dropped a credit card on the floor, and it was returned to me. Maybe it was karma.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Sat down at a mall to do some reading while my wife was busy. Found a cell phone on a chair nearby. Was able to call #1 in the memory, and asked them to come and pick it up. They treated me like a criminal. After that, I have found two other cell phones that people had dropped, but now I turn them into the store manager, rather than have to explain to people how I found it.

I developed the habit as a youth to try to be aware of my surroundings, and it has resulted in finding all sorts of things.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

What keeps to amaze me is that some guys carry their wallets in their back pocket, which is the easiest place to get lost or stolen.

Business people never carry such thick wallets in their back pocket or any other pockets. No doubt the thick wallet fell out of the bag somehow. The its owner he/she must have been so tired or so busy about something on crowded train and then he/she opened the bag to look for something needed, then the wallet fell out of the bag unnoticed. That I can imagine.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

If a foreigner return lost item to koban they'll be interrogated for almost one hour while they'll be asking to fill many form of papers. 

Typical gaikokujin playing the victim card.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Why is it every time there's a story like this, people are so quick to generalize entire groups of people? There are honest and dishonest people everywhere you go.

That being said, if this story is true, then it's great she's honest. But modest? She is definitely not. Nobody puts out a story like this without wanting to receive some recognition, praise or brownie points.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I usually carry my wads of cash in a backpack.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

i once left my fanny bag in the toilet of a MacD's in Shinjuku. I discovered my carelessness and returned to find it several hours later. It had been taken to the counter of the shop and so I got it back. It contained money and other valuable items like credit cards, driver license, etc. I was so grateful, but could not locate the honest person who did me the kindness. I thanked him/her in my prayers.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This must have been a huge wallet. A million yen is a really thick wad of notes and wouldn't fit in an average wallet, that's assuming they were all ¥10,000 notes. If ones and fives were included, you'd need a bag.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

haha fanny bag

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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