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Japanese WWII soldier who hid in Philippine jungle until 1974 dies

84 Comments
By Hiroshi Hiyama

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No doubt another candidate for the war shrine. Guy has the Japanese sprint: fight to the bitter end.

-5 ( +11 / -16 )

The adulation and cheering would be quite galling to the families of the dozens of innocent people he murdered during peacetime.

Onoda should have been held accountable and punished. Officials made numerous attempts to tell him the war was over but he ignored them. Some simple investigation could have revealed the truth, but he seems to have been in denial. He was an "information officer," after all.

2 ( +22 / -20 )

I don't think he ever wanted to come back to live Japan, on return he left Japan and went to live in South America after all.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I feel for the dozens of Philippine victims - mostly poor farmers - of this madman. It beggars belief some treated him as a hero.

19 ( +31 / -12 )

3 decades of loyalty. That's impressive. Got to admire the Japanese spirit to fight.

-6 ( +18 / -24 )

He did indeed kill innocent victims.

Yet he returned to Lubang at he invitation of the local government, where he made a donation towards scholarship.

1 ( +14 / -13 )

China and Korea need not afraid of Japan because we don't have people like him in today's Japan fortunately or unfortunately.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Love him or hate him the guy really had a survival mentality and that is something to be admired. Incredible.

6 ( +21 / -15 )

He was responsible for killings and other crimes after 1945. He was just lucky that he was pardoned by Marcos after he was caught.

11 ( +18 / -7 )

He'll be getting the hero treatment, because the Japanese establishment still have this fetish for imperialism and don't really believe that anything done in the war was wrong. Likewise when the efforts were being made to get him back; the Japanese media at the time were outraged when some Filipino policemen shot at him; apparently no regard for the fact that he had murdered several Filipino civilians, who apparently just didn't matter.

He should have been locked up to rot in a Filipino jail decades ago. Instead we get treated to this glorification of war. Yay.

11 ( +23 / -12 )

He's probably admired for both perseverance and nationalism. But which of these two attributes is more important is dependent on the individual.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

I wonder, did Hirohito let him visit or did the IHA keep him away. After all he was fighting for the Emperor and after the war they tried to remake Hirohito's image to that of just a bystander and not responsible.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

He was a fanatical mass murderer and should have been treated as such.

4 ( +16 / -12 )

He killed some 30 Filipino inhabitants of the island.....

16 ( +23 / -7 )

Gokurosamadeshta!

-4 ( +7 / -11 )

victors write history. although many have a distaste of this man because ultimately he fought on the "wrong" side, if japan won the war, he would've been a national hero with parades and gun salutes. it all depends on whose side you were on and who won in the end. as a japanese descendant, i remind people that most soldiers fighting were not fanatical racist imperialists bent on worldwide domination. the movie 'letters from iwo jima' portray this and although there were fanatics, they were a minority in the scheme of things. there were many uprooted from their families who had no desire to fight. (my family and friend's families included)

it seems after reading this board that people are condemning the war spirit of the japanese army. although i'm not a supporter of the imperialist army, the 1930-40's were a very different time. honor is a big part of japanese culture but indeed it was too bad that some in the militarist government took it too far.

it really is a sad dilemma asia is in now. i blame the japanese government for being particularly insensitive to historical events and because of this, the cycle of hate only continues. generations of koreans and chinese are still being taught of the horrible events of WWII caused by japan (as they should be, facts are facts) and japan continues to be, under the surface, xenophobic to a certain extent. it just creates a toxic mix that taints relations in asia to this day. as a young adult myself, its probably up to the younger generations to reverse this trend. its getting better as time passes so we can only hope. (i know this post will be censored for irrelevance but i just wanted to let people know not all japanese online are netouyo fanatics)

5 ( +15 / -10 )

You have to feel a bit sorry for him. He was 22 in 1945. His fanaticism meant that he didn't return to Japan until he was 49 years old. He was an intelligence officer too and still didn't realize or didn't want to believe that Japan lost. His fanaticism was in line with Japan of that era. The fact that Japan treated him as a hero is line with the story of the 47 ronin. I consider neither him nor the 47 ronin as heros. The 47 ronin didn't follow bushido and Onoda became a terrorist instead of facing reality. Of the 4, the smart one was the one who came out of the jungle in 1950. Hero, terrorist, both and neither, like the suicide bomber of today, he was a product of his times.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Apart from the elements of war and politics, this is a soldier worthy of respect.

2 ( +9 / -7 )

Last Samurai has just passed away.

I think I was still in Japan when he returned to Japan. I remember him wiping tears in returning flight when he saw Fujisan again. I remember him saluting to his commander at Haneda Airport upon arrival. This guy truly understood what it means to take an oath to serve for country.

Rest in Peace, Mr. Onoda. You are one of the most honorable and courageous men I knew. Thank you for serving.

-5 ( +9 / -14 )

Seems there was fruit in this guys cake.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Onoda later explained he had believed attempts to coax him out were the work of a puppet regime installed in Tokyo by the United States

The most terrible mistake and dishonesty was made in history by US was letting Japanese people believe that Emperor Hirohito is not guilty and any wrong doing. Post war Puppet regime installed by US has white washed and diluted the history with their own version. Since than Japan has never come clean about their unpleasant past.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/hirohito_emperor.shtml

He read about his home country in newspapers that searchers deliberately scattered in the jungle for him to find, but dismissed their content as propaganda.

That sentence has demonstrated even a matured and experienced solider believe that Japan defeat of WWII was a propaganda. Many die hard pro J posters have also fiercely defended J imperial army atrocities like that remaining soldier. No wonder new J generation will be sensitive, flip flopping and combative about their fore fathers sins and crimes.

He returned to Lubang in 1996 on a visit, reportedly at the invitation of the local government, despite his having been involved in the killing of dozens of Filipinos during his three-decade battle.

President Marcos was the most corrupted President for letting his for leaving Phillipines without any charges. Realtiy is many decedents of victims want him to be charged as war criminal. He has beheaded many poor Filipinos with his sword. He has been free as bird because Marcos has been bribed with huge Sum of money.

His funeral will be celebration for Lubang. Not for mourning in Yasukuni shrine.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

This man makes me think how a human can be a fanatic, and how deeply people were brainwashed by the Japanese imperial cultural education. I can not believe the international criminal court didn't put him on the war criminal list, and hunt him down. Once again, we should thank America dropped the "fat boy"s stopped the madness.

-4 ( +10 / -14 )

Kawaii ka chan, the Americans of that time did not like to take prisoners. So this young man and 3 others were separated from the other troops. Perhaps they saw what happened to the others that tried to surrender. It is also known the Philippine troops even over Americans hated the Japanese. It is all so easy to talk about the evil Japanese and good Americans. By the time he surrendered am sure he was out of his mind. Then again perhaps he was out of his mind all along. So you compare him with current day like that God awful Pacific movie. Turning Japanese troops into Taliban which they were not. So the teaching of hating Japanese continues to this day. This man attracted attention because it is never to late to redeem oneself. You know nothing about this man and his life after being returned. How about learning something about this man before you pass judgement. I view him not as a hero but a lost man finding his way home.

-9 ( +7 / -16 )

If I refused to believe that the police are police, or that my neighbours have not been body-snatched by aliens, can I kill them? Obviously not.

How my crime will be treated depends upon many factors but primarily upon the answer to 'was my misplaced lack of belief plausible?" Was Second Lieutenant Onoda's lack of belief in the end of the war plausible? Another possibility is that he feared being tried for murder. Which is more plausible?

I agree with Amekenji that victors write history. But by 1974 in some senses Japan had become a victor at least economically. Prior to this economic victory, in the early 1950's for instance, had Second Lieutenant Onoda given up his fight then, would his story have been accepted? How would he have been treated?

May they all rest in peace.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

"refusing to believe World War II was over"? Sounds like a nut case to me.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

A very sad reminder of how poisonous nationalism, blind faith in fellow mammals as 'divine' and propaganda can be. Let's hope this is never repeated. RIP the 30.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

Jimizo: "A very sad reminder of how poisonous nationalism, blind faith in fellow mammals as 'divine' and propaganda can be. Let's hope this is never repeated."

Sadly, it's being repeated as we speak. Agree with you completely about how sad it is, too. There are a lot of people who see this guy as a hero, but I see him as the sad result of exactly what you said. I AM glad he was able to use his skills to open up a youth camp, and able to get away to Brazil and start up a ranch. In any case, a rather sad waste of a good part of life -- and for nothing.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

Poor guy! He never figured out what he had stood for. Mercy on him.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

it seems after reading this board that people are condemning the war spirit of the japanese army.

I could care less what army that fool maniac fought for. I would be happy if ALL war spirit disappeared from this Earth of stupid people who will kill on orders, even when the orders are decades old and so obviously no longer relevant to anybody. For all the people he killed, how many told him the war was over? How many appeared to be on war alert? How many shot at him first, or at all?

No, there is no victor's justice here. All there is victim mentality from Japan...yet again. I spit on this man's grave, and I would spit in his face if he were still alive. I don't care for freak shows, and so his survival skills and "war spirit" would not impress me in the slightest despite some people's need to bow to those traits insignificant in the face of his three decades of murderous insanity.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

This guy is a perfect example of what was WRONG with the IJA & Japan back then, when you figure the many many 10s of thousands just like him savaging the landscape wherever the landed & you can easily see why Japan was responsible for 20-30million deaths in WWII, one of the most savage killing machines in history given the number killed on a per year basis.

And while many say the Nazi's were worst because the also singled out Jewish people for extermination & Japan didn't, in that case they are correct BUT you have to remember Japan simply didn't care WHO they killed etc, men, women or children, Japan killed them all.

Too bad most Japanese haven't learned what their country was really like, what it DID! And even with people like abe & ishihara hoping to back to those times, thankfully I don't think its possible BUT that lemming like trait still lurks below the surface & even like the 1930-40's the Japanese of today would most likely follow a maniac of a leader if he gained momentum EVEN if most Japanese DIDNT want too, they would follow, I mean that's what happened in the 1930's & this soldier is a poster for that fanaticism!

3 ( +6 / -3 )

The past is over and we should be looking towards the future. I still think the defeat made him insane.

-6 ( +6 / -12 )

"Onoda later explained he had believed attempts to coax him out were the work of a puppet regime installed in Tokyo by the United States."

He sure got that right...

2 ( +6 / -4 )

He just obeyed order.He just obeyed the military law of IJA. He might think "If I stop fighting and surrender , I have to go to Court-martial".

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

JeffLeeJan. 18, 2014 - 07:09AM JST

Onoda should have been held accountable and punished.

By who? The Tokyo Trial was completed in 1948. It was one of the most unfair trial in history and still a good legal study material in USA.

Officials made numerous attempts to tell him the war was over but he ignored them. Some simple investigation could have revealed the truth, but he seems to have been in denial.

He did not trust them because the order did not come from his direct commander. That's how he was trained to do as intelligent soldier, my dear.

He was an "information officer," after all.

He did passed the test. I want him in my camp.

You are losing older generation of Japan who truly understand a suffering in war.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

By who?

The Philippine government. For murder. Not complicated.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

funny carJan. 18, 2014 - 03:34PM JST

By who?

The Philippine government. For murder. Not complicated.

No trial was requested. Please come back and challenge me after reading the WW2 history. Thanks.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

What if his commanding officer had died? He wouldn't have given up?

Still, a medal for commitment and loyalty.

And the Philippines don't hark on about crimes to this day like China and Korea do. Imagine if he was stationed in one of these two countries.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I can understand how one might admire this guy's survival skills but not much else. He just seems like he was a fanatic who crossed a line. Loyalty and bravery are good things but take them too far and you have fanaticism and cruelty. No country should want blind loyalty. He seems to me like those who stalk people because they "love them or those who abuse their children in the name of discipline.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

i cannot even begin to understand him, he lived in a time when to surrender was to shame himself and his family in the eyes of his Emperor and his Country. when even to admit defeat was bring shame.

many blew themselves up with grenades rather than do that

This was a time when the Emperor was still considered tennō - before the USA told the country otherwise.

today we call them fanatics but at the time they were just men who went to fight a war and believed

1 ( +3 / -2 )

No trial was requested.

Global, that hardly has anything to do with the simple statement that he SHOULD have been held accountable. Jeff Lee was speaking of right and wrong, not of historical fact.

Please come back and challenge me after reading the WW2 history. Thanks.

Please come back and comment when you learn what the word "should" means. Thanks.

And the Philippines don't hark on about crimes to this day like China and Korea do.

tokyo-star, I was thinking the government just did not value human life very much.

But if you look on youtube you can find Filipinos protesting American semi-secret bases there under the title "Anti-US protest in Philippines" I bet a lot of them were protesting in memory of the Balangiga massacre of 1901.

But I think you are a bit wrong-headed to accuse people of harking on about crimes of the past. Its more like denial of those crimes in the present that has people upset.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

YuriOtani Onoda san was not insane. He succeeded in a business in Brazil after hardships with help of local people who trusted him, and also projects in Japan. I watched him talking and I could tell he had clear mind and strong will and seemed very kind and passionate.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

A puppet regime in Tokyo? Not exactly, but not too far off it either

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I wonder why some "Divine power" did not prevent him from killing these innocent people.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I wish I could have met him! Those whom have never served can not fully appreciate when a soldier says "the mission never ends".

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

The man was a coward. He stole. And he killed. He was afraid to go home. So he hid. Day, after day, after day. Pathetic.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Truly a very brave and stoic man, worthy of respect.

And yet when he wrote his autobiography, he did not mention the civilians whom he had killed or injured. I can understand why. He must have been afraid of damaging his image and livelihood, and scared of risking his freedom from prosecution.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

What a fool.

This has nothing to do with honor, pride (it is our proud) or any other positive connotatioms you feel like attaching to this. It has all the smell of what I can't stand about Japan - blind obedience to orders. Thankfully , this country has somewhat moved away from that but I feel they are slowly moving back there. Non-thinkers are the scariest people of all.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

He died missing his Filipina comfort women.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

He must have been afraid of damaging his image and livelihood, and scared of risking his freedom from prosecution.

Or you could say he wanted to avoid paying for his crimes.

Truly a very brave and stoic man, worthy of respect.

Manure. Sugar coated manure.

I swear, if I had enough medals on my chest, and ran roadkill up a flagpole and called it honor and courage, half you people would salute it. Take the red pill people!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I wonder if the chinese will pitch a bitch if Abe attends the funeral

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Totally and lost nut! Nothing to do with heroism!

His place should have been a psychiatric hospital.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

An 'Intelligence' Officer who took 30 years to realise he was beaten - no wonder Japan lost the war !!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Flash HarryJan. 18, 2014 - 11:24PM JST

An 'Intelligence' Officer who took 30 years to realise he was beaten - no wonder Japan lost the war !!

In contrary to your post, I was told he devoted himself for a new life in Brazil with the locals and found peace with God. Better than the rest of us.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

@funny car

Hook, line, sinker.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Add another cost of war. Imagine how different his life would have den if he had not kept fighting a war, and how different it would have been for those in the Philippines. Now I wonder where the money to buy the cattle ranch came from. I doubt a 40 something old man out of touch wight he modern wold could have worked and earned that on his own. So where did the money come from. As they say follow the money trail.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

That's some very effective brain-washing there.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Now I wonder where the money to buy the cattle ranch came from.

He did not buy a ranch straight after arriving. His brother was there before him and he originally worked on a ranching enclave in Brazil that dozens of other Japanese families.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

At least that is what I have seen so far

0 ( +0 / -0 )

globalwatcher: In contrary to your post, I was told he devoted himself for a new life in Brazil with the locals and found peace with God. Better than the rest of us.

Not better than me - i've never murdered anyone.

This man took 30 peoples lives for no good reason.

He was a mass murderer. End of.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I hope someone makes a movie

0 ( +2 / -2 )

If a normal civilian murdered a single person, he or she should go to court and justice should be prevailed. For that case, he was privileged and left from Philippines as tourist. He was never been investigated for his crime. He has as not only murdered others during the war time. He also murdered other with cold blood even in the peace time( according his thinking he was still at war).

For his hunger, he stole other property such as cow, chicken or fruits. The worst thing was he did not admit any wrong doing and fabricated his story. Biased posters have transformed him as decent and honest solider disregarding the blood and headless bodies of the victims.

Imagine one of the JT poster grandpa was beheaded by him during his robbery. When the grandson or grand daughter read his fantastic story for transforming as Heroric survivor, he or she should be offended and helplessly frustrated about the injustice. Reality is Japanese government by self guilty for changing criminal as saint.

The moral of that story is Japan should be constantly reminded about white washing history with their own version. If there is no one demanding from Japan, Japan will publish new text book as Japan did not participate in WWII. Japan is the land of Saints and Angles. Everything about Japan wrong doing was rubbish.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

War is about killing... not national building. Don't ever hate a soldier for being a soldier. No one has the right to punish a soldier for killing people. That is what war is. Believe it or not a lot of innocent people die in war. Killing people in a time of war is a lot like killing ants. One is taught to defend a nation's ideas for enemies both domestic and foreign. Anyone who feels differently still lives in a sheltered world in which both soldiers and Marines defend.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

@JeffLee But yet all them Nuclear bombs America scientist Amry / UK / AU tested on there own people, should not be?

First you need proof that he killed someone, then second that would have to be a civilian.

What your saying is that all west troops in Iraq should be locked up and tried for killing Iraq forces or any civilian in the cross fire? After all Intel was wrong and we invaded and killed them for know reason???

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"I’ve been where you are now and I know just how you feel. It’s entirely natural that there should beat in the breast of every one of you a hope and desire that some day you can use the skill you have acquired here. Suppress it! You don’t know the horrible aspects of war. I’ve been through two wars and I know. I’ve seen cities and homes in ashes. I’ve seen thousands of men lying on the ground, their dead faces looking up at the skies. I tell you, war is Hell! William Tecumseh Sherman 1879"

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Not better than me - i've never murdered anyone.

This man took 30 peoples lives for no good reason.

He was a mass murderer. End of.

Well put.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

No one has the right to punish a soldier for killing people

If soldier killed solider, it was not a crime. If soldier killed civilian. It is a war crime. For that case, he killed not only one. Multiple people without order from his commander. That solider should be indicted and severely punished according the local law. . However he went away without the scratch. The reason was the justice was blocked with sweet money.

Believe it or not a lot of innocent people die in war.

That sentence comes from the article despite his having been involved in the killing of dozens of Filipinos during his three-decade battle.

He murdered people not in War. During the peace time for his struggle for surviving. He may be solider however he is not killing soldiers. He is killing innocent rural people during peace time.

Killing people in a time of war is a lot like killing ants.

Obviously that poster did not read full article. He could kill ants for his meals. However it might not be sufficient for his diet. Therefore he robbed, stole and killed villagers. Therefore he was a disgusting criminal. His crime was not related to war. He should beg for food instead of committing the criminal activities.

One is taught to defend a nation's ideas for enemies both domestic and foreign.

He was not defending for his nation's ideas! He stole, rob and killed other for his surviving. It has nothing to proud. In fact he was lower than professional bandits or thieves. At least , later has moral ground for performing their profession. He was not in the same occupation as later and intruding foreign nation.

Anyone who feels differently still lives in a sheltered world

Anyone who feels differently for protecting the low life criminal may still lives in lawless and wild west fairy world.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I don't feel any sympathy for him. He was, at best a complete idiot and, at worst a mass murderer.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

What would you have done better to survive if you were in his postion believing the war hadn't been over?

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

As his name implies, he was and forever will be known as a HERO. RIP Onoda HIROO sensei, the story of your passing will allow a new generation learn of the values for which you fought.

I wish I could have met him. His words, that we should think calmly about the past, think about the 100s of years of oppression that came crashing down due to efforts of souls like his. Think calmly about why 2 previously introverted nations would so quickly and completely raise the flags of war; think about the power of the convictions, that allowed 2 nations to take on the World and emerge on top, even after 'defeat'.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

This man took 30 peoples lives for no good reason.

On his wikipedia page the only supporting reference to his having killed any Philippinas is a Philippine documentary (which I can not understand) on Youtube. But in the comments it suggests that he killed two people.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

TinaWatanabe, trust me I wouldn't be in that position in the first place. Neither would most sane people. As I said, at best an idiot and certainly no hero.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

StewartJG Don't forget he came back about 40 years ago. And the education he had was of some 80 years ago. As he said "people varies from era to era" His mentality certainly has some virtue from a different culture.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Murder is murder, was it not a crime 80 years ago?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

To constitue a crime, the accused has to have awareness of commiting the crime. In Onoda's case, he merely defending for the country in his mind, so it's not a murder in legal term. And since when's action of his do you consider murder? Entire his service? or after the end of war? He came back when convinced war was over.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

No one has the right to punish a soldier for killing people. That is what war is.

Oh no! Duh! I cannot believe that comment has so few negative votes!

Oh no duh killed and wounded innocent civilians, a criminal acts and murder for a soldier even when it is war time. Do you understand why Sgt. Robert Bales is in jail for life with no chance of parole?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

He just believed the validity of the emperor's decree of opening war on America and Britain until the end of his life. That may be why the emperor Showa kept silent about him and also why Onoda himself declined to meet the emperor. His ruthlessness and dedication as a soldier cannot be envisaged or cinematized as Francis Coppola depicted Kurtz.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

My last point on this subject, he killed unarmed civilians working in their farms apparently. He beheaded a farmer working in his field which could be argued to show a grossly passion for killing. I fail to see how these actions could be considered defending his country. He should have been brought to justice my the Philippine government.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

This one man is enough to see that Japan would never go to length in admitting defeat even with the threats of citizens being involved. Nationalists always seem to forget that conveniently.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I admire his determination and loyalty.

I pity his inability to be rational.

I condemn his murders.

0 ( +0 / -1 )

admire his determination and loyalty.

This exactly what create massive inter-country issues!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I have nothing but admiration for Mr. Odona. He was cut off from his command, and seriously did not know the war was over. Its's tragic that people suffered from his mistake. And it's also tragic that he lost 30 years of his life. His loyalty and dedication to his country that we should all learn something from. I'm American, my father fought in the Pacific . I remember his having nothing but respect for Mr. Onoda. Just yesterday I lost my uncle. He was in his nineties, too. My uncle John worked on the atomic bomb in Oak Ridge Tennessee. He later went to Los Alamos and setteled at the lab in Livermore, Ca. We were killing each other then. But both of these fine men gave their all for their Countries. I admire the fighting spirit of Mr. Onoda and the way he lived when his ordeal was over. May he rest in peace.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

To all the people expressing admiration or sympathy for this guy -- you should be ashamed of yourselves. This fanatic murdered dozens of innocent people in peacetime because he didn't want to accept the 'glory of the empire' was over. How do you think the families of the people he murdered feel?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

In respect to him, he endured a very bad time, to humble the idea that it was right. And, obviously, a very long time. He must have been one of the greatest fighters in the world.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

He must have killed people in Philippine, War is justification of murder. You think he should have been killed and not returned?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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