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Japan’s demand for seafood declines, especially among young generation: report

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Japan’s seafood consumption has declined drastically, especially among the younger generation, according to a government report released this week.

The report reveals that the total per-capita marine food consumption in the year through March 2016 had declined to 27.3 kilograms, 30% down from a peak of 40.2 kilograms in fiscal 2001, Sankei Shimbun reported.

The decreasing seafood consumption is especially prevalent among people younger than 40, who are increasingly replacing the country’s once most common food with meat, the report reveals.

Meanwhile, with the overall seafood consumption in most developing countries increasing, the report further suggests that Japan may profit from expanding its export market in the future, as a means to compensate for domestic sales decline.

A successful example, specifically mentioned in the report, was the cooperation of six seafood companies based in Ishinomaki, Miyagi Prefecture, an area that was severely damaged by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in 2001. The alignment resulted in producing a new seafood brand, which is successfully expanding export sales globally and contributing to sustaining the Sanriku area’s overall financial growth.

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Meanwhile, with the overall seafood consumption in most developing countries increasing, the report further suggests that Japan may profit from expanding its export market in the future, as a means to compensate for domestic sales decline.

Why? Japan's seafood is nothing special and at best would only be a niche market. Viet Nam and other SE Asian countries already are exporting literally tons and tons of fish-farmed products all over the world. Also who would want to pay $10.00 (US) for a single small sized scallop anyway?

Wishful thinking I do believe.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

This young generation seems well aware of Fukushima nuclear power plant's contaminated water leakage into sea of Japan...

11 ( +15 / -4 )

Good. Surprised there are any fish left the way they harvest them.

15 ( +18 / -3 )

Well, possibly the younger generation are starting to believe all the international reports about all the poisons, heavy metals and plastics in seafood, especially in smaller fish and cetaceans. Or, possibly they are starting to believe how the constant rape of the oceans will eventually destroy the planet and they are accepting the responsibility for being one of the main culprits.

11 ( +15 / -4 )

Maybe they just like meat.

14 ( +16 / -2 )

who are increasingly replacing the country’s once most common food with meat

It is hard to say if changing to meat will have much effect on the overall health of planet or body or sentient beings. Fish might be healthier in their uncontaminated state but they are not uncontaminated and meat certainly is not. The oceans may get some tiny respite from the rapacious predations but producing meat is an environmental disaster.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

Fish takes time to prepare and a bit skill to cook. Fast food, coffee and cigarettes are quick and easy, especially if you are single. Won't mention Fukushima.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

They're moving on to Yakiniku and Burgers, which taste better

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

Viet Nam and other SE Asian countries already are exporting literally tons and tons of fish-farmed products all over the world

Oh, the lovely fish farms of Southeast Asia. You get what you pay for. https://youtu.be/IdoVgveiZO0

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I love yakizakana. My wife makes it for breakfast every morning. Japanese seafood is very delicious. However, when we traveled to Massachusetts last summer and bought Atlantic Salmon and cod, my wife was blown away with the superior flavor, and the fact that the fish is de-boned. If you are a fan of seafood, eat from the Atlantic 0 the quality is far superior.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Wasn't there an article about increase up cupnoodle purchases, maybe the cause of this.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Well, in a way this is good news for Atlantic bluefin tuna...Might have a chance at not being extincted.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Mac Donaldo is gobbling up once a rich food and diet culture...a pity.

The change is also good to see at an average 'all you can eat' kaiten sushi...less fish, more chocolate - vanilla cups passing by in front of you :-)

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Japan’s demand for seafood declines,

Well, the population is declining.. might have something to do with it...

especially among young generation

probably because of what others said.. Fukushima is a major ( and legitimate) concern.

Anyway, the number of fishermen is also declining, so maybe it'll all work out.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Yeh, the world is just straining at the leash to gobble up some Fukishima seafood.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Viet Nam and other SE Asian countries already are exporting literally tons and tons of fish-farmed products all over the world. Also who would want to pay $10.00 (US) for a single small sized scallop anyway?

SE Asian fish products are so cheap because they're often caught by slaves. Not workers that are paid wages so low that they might as well be slaves, but actual slaves.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

poisons, heavy metals and plastics in seafood, especially in smaller fish and cetaceans.

That would be "larger fish and cetaceans" (biomagnification).

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I would says the combination of Fukushima + TEPCO constant water discharge + Labeling falsification + Recent trait of Japanese Corp to deceive and cheat their customers for quick yen, I guess the young are taking precaution which is rather good.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This young generation seems well aware of Fukushima nuclear power plant's contaminated water leakage into sea of Japan...

Do you mean "sea off Japan" or "Sea of Japan"? The "Sea of Japan" is the disputed name for the body of water between Japan and Korea. It's on the other side of the country from Fukushima.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

That would be "larger fish and cetaceans" (biomagnification).

There are plenty of small edible fish that are also ingesting plastic crumbs.

I'm personally quite pleased to know about these declining sales. A large amount of ocean pollution is contributed by seafood vessels, and regardless of the pollution, there is reality of a shrinking population in marine wildlife. I am not an environmentalist, I am a regular guy - but I know there is a very real problem.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Wasn't there an article about increase up cupnoodle purchases, maybe the cause of this

Papi,

You beat me to it LOL!! I was going to say the only seafood most young people can afford these days is the SEAFOOD cup o noodle!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

There are plenty of small edible fish that are also ingesting plastic crumbs.

Yes, except I didn't say otherwise; bioaccumulation starts with the smallest fish--or in the case of heavy metals, with what the smallest fish are eating (algae, plankton, etc.).

What I pointed out is that toxins are not "especially" present in smaller fish--the opposite is true. The higher up on the food chain an animal is, the higher the concentration of fat-soluble toxins in them. That's how biomagnification works.

Small fish eat a little toxin, bigger fish eat a lot of those small fish, even bigger fish eat a lot of those fish, and so on.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Just food and flavor diversification imo. The french drink less wine, eat less bread and i assume the italians also eat less pasta than before. Still their staple food but not as it used to be. We acquire new taste and are exposed to different foods these days.

So not surprising J new generations also eat less 'shea food' and more bread, meats, junk food etc.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I personally have reduced my seafood consumption since 2011, so I am guessing others might do the same, this is enlightenment, one must take self precaution since the govt is not doing it.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@ Sioux Chef

I understand.

However, it would seem that your correction of Disillusioned's comment would imply that there was something wrong in the first place. There is nothing incorrect about his statement.

Furthermore, I would like to inform you that many small fish found on the sea food market have contained enough plastic to warrant press attention. Generalization or not, there is an undeniable catastrophe that is effecting all levels of marine life. Whether you find it easier or not to find it in a big fish, or a small fish, does not change the facts that plastic is consumed by all sizes of fish.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Great! That just means better fish at lower prices for yours truly. Japanese marine cuisine is the best in the world, and it has gotten a lot better since 3 11. Unless you are planning on eating muck suckers, radiation is not a factor at all. Heavy metals have been a concern, but safe levels have been set extremely low, and we don't have leaded gas, leaded paint, leaded dental fillings, or leaded anything anymore. I am not concerned that my overall intake is a problem.

But if everyone else wants to go on believing what some environmental NGO says to guarantee their funding, go right ahead.

Besides, aren't we supposed to be worried about mad cow, avian flu, steroids, animal cruelty, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in meat and poultry? Oh. Sorry. That was LAST week. This week we are supposed to fear fish.

tl/dr meh.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Could also be that fish and seafood cost a ton and on the average salary meat and poultry are more affordable.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

However, it would seem that your correction of Disillusioned's comment would imply that there was something wrong in the first place. There is nothing incorrect about his statement.

Yes, there is something wrong. Toxins are not found "especially" in small fish and cetaceans. They are found especially in large fish and cetaceans.

Whether you find it easier or not to find it in a big fish, or a small fish, does not change the facts that plastic is consumed by all sizes of fish.

Not sure why you are repeating this straw man once more, but it looks like you're still not getting it. I'm not going to explain it a third time.

Cheers.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

With more people working part time, even meat is expensive. Some have no choice but to eat more of cup-a-noodle.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Toxins are not found "especially" in small fish and cetaceans. They are found especially in large fish and cetaceans.

As a matter of fact, there was no mention of toxins in the first place. Please read the post that you attempted to correct. The user, Disillusioned, makes no mention of toxins. He mentions the consumption of metallic and plastic materials.

I will also point out that you are generalizing your use of the word "especially". Although a larger fish has more body mass and thus more cargo room to store toxins, this does not allow you to generalize larger fish as "especially" toxic. There are many factors, particularly regional factors that play a bigger part. In some regions, depending on the particular source of pollution, you may find that the smaller fish are the ones most infected.

I was willing to listen to any viable points you had to offer, but now I understand that you are only intent on defending your false correction. That is a shame.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The decreasing seafood consumption is especially prevalent among people younger than 40, who are increasingly replacing the country’s once most common food with meat, the report reveals.

Eating more meat will lead to serious deforestation.

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/beef-production-is-killing-the-amazon-rainforest/

0 ( +2 / -2 )

As a matter of fact, there was no mention of toxins in the first place.

As a matter of fact, this is completely false.

Please read the post that you attempted to correct.

Ok. Let's:

" the poisons, heavy metals and plastics in seafood, especially in smaller fish and cetaceans"

These are toxins. Do you understand now?

I will also point out that you are generalizing your use of the word "especially". Although a larger fish has more body mass and thus more cargo room to store toxins, this does not allow you to generalize larger fish as "especially" toxic.

I can't figure out if you're just trolling me at this point; it is fact that larger fish and cetaceans are especially toxic. If you can't understand the explanation I gave you about bioaccumulation and biomagnification, please try another source as I can't make it any simpler. It isn't a matter of having more body mass "to store toxins"--it is a matter of being at a higher trophic level, thereby consuming exponentially greater amounts of toxins than animals lower in the food chain.

I was willing to listen to any viable points you had to offer, but now I understand that you are only intent on defending your false correction. That is a shame.

The shame is that you are clearly projecting here.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

These are toxins. Do you understand now?

They are responsible for releasing toxins, but they are not toxins themselves.. Please stop. You are making the scientific community cringe.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

They are responsible for releasing toxins, but they are not toxins themselves

You think "poison" isn't a toxin? These words are synonymous. You think heavy metals are not toxins? If so, you are very, very confused. I'll grant you that toxins are leeched from plastics but you are just trying (and failing) to play word games at this point because you are simply wrong.

The irony of you saying someone is "making the scientific community cringe" is incredible. Also, the dictionary is your friend, friend.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Toxins are actually a type of poison, not the other way around. It is one that is generated within an organic living property. It can be a bi-product of other poisons that are ingested by the host.

I think you have confused "toxin" with "toxic".

In any case, you don't need a dictionary. I implore anybody that questions this debate to use Google.

Please Google "toxin". Thanks.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Then "toxicant".

I'm still right. Large fish and cetaceans are especially toxic--not small fish.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

If you must correct yourself, you aren't right.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

A CupNoodle in every home

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Disillusioned - riiiight, like that could possibly happen with japanese youth!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Or could it be that seafood is ridiculously expensive in Japan and all this fake Chinese meat that is labeled American, Australian, and even Japanese is just more affordable?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

More saba for me!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It's spring maybe ppl are just more prone to allergy. I know I am

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Or could it be that seafood is ridiculously expensive in Japan...

Not that I have noticed. Have you actually compared prices with other developed countries?

and all this fake Chinese meat that is labeled American, Australian, and even Japanese is just more affordable?

Do you have evidence of this, or are you just making stuff up? There are a lot of fake origin labels in China, on garlic, clothes and other products, but meat would not be a common one.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japanese old pensioners and retiree which make up the majority of populations, should stop eating fish. They shud start working and eat meat. Fish will be sustainable this way.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I don't know about beef, I see the university kids mostly eating sweet bread. And for the single workers, it's 7-11 or the like or fast food.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Wow. What is all the fuss? Fish is good food. More fish please.

This is a pretty worn-out pattern by now in the media. I think PINK SLIME rants were all the rage at one time. Get people thinking and wondering about what is in their food, and you can herd them like cattle.

Come on. If you are going to gross out someone about some food, it is hugely easy to do. There are insects in our cabbage, rat hairs in our milk, and fish poo in ocean. Let's all grow up and acknowledge that all foods cause cancer because eating food keeps us alive, which gives cancer a chance. Does anyone here even bother to grow their own? Anyone? People who have no idea where their food comes from complaining about what someone tells them about their food. It is a tornado of fear and ignorance.

When you buy fresh fish, nobody has salted it or injected it with saline or adulterated it. I love that. It is a fish. A lot of times with beef and pork, you can't identify the cut. Country of origin? Good luck. Fish is WYSIWYG.

And it is very very difficult to pull a fast one on some customer with sashimi and sushi. No fancy sauces or cooking method can take bad fish to good sushi. I think that is great.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Are they being frugal (price) eco-friendly ( over fishing) or cautious (radioactivity, Mercury, toxins, plastics finiding their way into the seafood that is served)?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"Meanwhile, with the overall seafood consumption in most developing countries increasing, the report further suggests that Japan may profit from expanding its export market in the future, as a means to compensate for domestic sales decline."

Or, they could just stop overfishing and relying on failed methods of bolstering the economy -- especially given how protectionist Japan is when it comes to importing, but still wanting everyone else to have its exports.

5Speedracer5: "Great! That just means better fish at lower prices for yours truly. Japanese marine cuisine is the best in the world, and it has gotten a lot better since 3 11."

I love how people think a fish caught in the ocean near Japan somehow tastes better as a result! Fish caught in Japanese waters that are the same type of fish caught elsewhere taste no different. It's how food is prepared that makes one nationalities food contrastable to others, not where a fish is caught. So, you have the same fish being caught, and suddenly these people think they can enter poor developing nations' markets when the same fish are available and much cheaper elsewhere? That's putting a whole lot of faith in the 'made in Japan' label, especially when nothing was actually 'made', and given Japan's propensity to mislabel and pad the numbers on how good their products are.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I don't trust the government's report. Think this is a head's up report to get in front of seafood shortage caused by over consumption by the Japanese. Several years from now, when the world wakes up to the fact that over fishing and consumption by the Japanese lead to shortages, the can site this report and states that they didn't eat all the tuna.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Huh, This article didn't calculate about a Conveyor Belt Sushi which can eat for 100 yen.

You had better not write such an article without background knowledge.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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