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Just 16% of Japan assembly heads open to foreigners voting in referendums

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Assembly chiefs who expressed reservations offered reasons including that many foreign nationals living in Japan are technical intern trainees or holders of other residence categories that mean they are likely to stay for a limited period before ultimately returning home.

am I right in thinking that 'trainees' and the like are granted only limited stays? if so.....

the other day there was an article about 'encouraging' highly-skilled foreign talent to Japan (those earning 20 ~ 40 m yen pa) and even they would only be granted short-term 'opportunities' (2, or 5 years I think it was).....

-9 ( +7 / -16 )

Just 16 percent of prefectural and municipal assembly leaders in Japan believe there should be further debate

But no debate when it comes foreigners need to pay multiple tax and mandatory pension scheme in Japan.

7 ( +46 / -39 )

Japan is the same as a majority of nations - you need to become a citizen in order to vote at any level.

Long term residents should absolutely take up citizenship if they wish to vote.

12 ( +46 / -34 )

Japan?

Come and give the best years of your life, pay taxes and be quiet and go home.

There are plenty of countries out there that offer so much more than Japan and they are the countries receiving foreign workers

-8 ( +37 / -45 )

If resident foreigners are always made to feel excluded then don't be surprised if they feel and act excluded. Only the most ardent can continue with their unrequited 'love' for Japan.

-10 ( +34 / -44 )

What is the problem here? Why should foreign residents be allowed to vote?

-16 ( +28 / -44 )

I have permanent residence, been in Japan almost 15 years, have a wife and child and pay all my taxes, national healthcare and pension premiums yet I have zero political rights in this country. No right to vote in elections or referendums. No right to have any influence the welfare or wellbeing of myself or my family.

I think dogs would get the vote before they allow foreigners to vote in Japan. Something that makes me regret deciding to put down roots here.

-6 ( +44 / -50 )

Bad especially for permanent resident. But I think this is the same in the vast majority of countries.

21 ( +30 / -9 )

You may be a permanent resident, pay all your taxes and contribute to the local community, but the Japanese will never look upon you as a member of "their" society.

 'encouraging' highly-skilled foreign talent to Japan....Hahaha!

-14 ( +26 / -40 )

@Capuchin

You have the right to vote in Japan not because you pay taxes and pension premiums but because you’re a Japanese citizen. If you want to vote here so badly, just naturalize. It’s that simple. Many long term residents choose to do this.

6 ( +28 / -22 )

I have permanent residence, been in Japan almost 15 years, have a wife and child and pay all my taxes, national healthcare and pension premiums yet I have zero political rights in this country. No right to vote in elections or referendums. No right to have any influence the welfare or wellbeing of myself or my family.

And why haven't you taken the next step and become a naturalized citizen here if these things bother you so much?

There are not many countries, as far as I know, that allow people to vote, that are not citizens. Why should Japan be any different? Particularly when it comes to people, like you, who have made the choice to become a permanent resident, and seem to think that you should have that "right", even though you are part of a really tiny minority.

For referendums I would agree that permanent residents, should be allowed to have a voice, but for elections, no. If you truly want to stay here, take citizenship and get involved in the "process" and get the "right" to influence or be a part of the electoral process!

10 ( +30 / -20 )

They have to pay tax right?

What is the problem here? Why should foreign residents be allowed to vote?

2 ( +20 / -18 )

They have to pay tax right?

No they don't, they are welcome to choose to live in their home country instead. There is zero obligation for them to live in Japan and therefore pay taxes.

-18 ( +13 / -31 )

Assembly chiefs who expressed reservations offered reasons including that many foreign nationals living in Japan are technical intern trainees or holders of other residence categories that mean they are likely to stay for a limited period before ultimately returning home.

Is there data to support this claim?

6 ( +10 / -4 )

You may be a permanent resident, pay all your taxes and contribute to the local community, but the Japanese will never look upon you as a member of "their" society.

In my experience, that's incorrect. I was included in the neighborhood events, from barbeques to cleaning the community center, along with my neighbors. My clients sign our company on and hire us the same as Japanese companies. I am allowed to live here indefinitely.

The big difference I suspect is I actually speak Japanese, and make an effort to be part of my community. For those who don't really speak Japanese and don't try to participate in their communities, it may seem like they don't want you here.

10 ( +25 / -15 )

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-citizen_suffrage

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Tax liability should equal voting right. Simple as that.

You don't want me to vote in how your country is run, then don't make me pay for the running of it.

"Hey, you can't come to my party, but you have to pay for the cake, because reasons."

-1 ( +18 / -19 )

I think permanent residents should be allowed to vote, but the others are just temporary visitors.

7 ( +16 / -9 )

And why haven't you taken the next step and become a naturalized citizen here if these things bother you so much?

Yubaru

Because that would require me to surrender the citizenship of my own birth country as Japan doesn't allow for dual nationality like most developed nations.

I agree with Strangerland. I don't think the xenophobia exists in a majority of the population it's more the dinosaur political elites who are more concerned about protecting their grift than acting in the interests of the nation.

Japan is the most rapidly aging country on the planet and whether they like it or not the only realistic way to offset that is through immigration. They also need foreign talent to remain internationally competitive and foreign labour to plug the gaps rapidly being depleted by Japan's plunging population.

6 ( +20 / -14 )

Because that would require me to surrender the citizenship of my own birth country as Japan doesn't allow for dual nationality like most developed nations.

Then, like it or not, you will not have the right to participate in the electoral process. If you plan on staying here for the rest of your life, it is something to seriously consider getting done.

1 ( +19 / -18 )

I'd never give up my citizenship just to be able to vote here.

No way !

-1 ( +28 / -29 )

This must be the Japanese law makers worst nightmare.

They just can't comprehend the idea that a Resident and Tax Paying foreigner can have a say in his daily life affairs.

So typical with everything else Japan does, always a ONE WAY STREET relations, take, take, take only.

-8 ( +20 / -28 )

But no debate when it comes foreigners need to pay multiple tax and mandatory pension scheme in Japan.

Yep

You may be a permanent resident, pay all your taxes and contribute to the local community, but the Japanese will never look upon you as a member of "their" society.

 'encouraging' highly-skilled foreign talent to Japan....Hahaha!

well said.

I think dogs would get the vote before they allow foreigners to vote in Japan. Something that makes me regret deciding to put down roots here.

same here

-18 ( +17 / -35 )

16%? I am surprised its that high.

-19 ( +9 / -28 )

You don't want me to vote in how your country is run, then don't make me pay for the running of it.

If you don't want to pay for it, leave. You chose to live here, they didn't make you, and you have citizenship and therefore the right to live somewhere else. Why would they let foreign interests determine how their country is run?

-12 ( +9 / -21 )

The big difference I suspect is I actually speak Japanese, and make an effort to be part of my community. For those who don't really speak Japanese and don't try to participate in their communities, it may seem like they don't want you here.

Participating in the community is major! Everyone, in my area, who pay the local "ward/ku" fee's has a right to vote in the local "ku-cho" election, held every two years, no matter if they are foreign or domestic, as the "setai nushi" or home owner.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Even if established, those votings or referendums would be on unimportant or senseless topics only. So, of course excluded somehow now, nothing would change with allowed participation in local referendums. For example it doesn’t interest me at all if the new playground with almost no children nowadays is painted in blue or in pink, and the 79 th senior Hula dance club allowed training and performances at the local citizens’ hall or not, that’s also something I wouldn’t feel a need to vote for or against.

-10 ( +6 / -16 )

Even if established, those votings or referendums would be on unimportant or senseless topics only.

exactly. they are designed to give the illusion of democracy.

In a country where the political party which was established with the help of the CIA, has deep ties to a south korean cult as well as a nationalistic one, has lorded over the populace for longer than many middle eastern dicatorships, and at the same time nurtures racism and xenophobia, why anyone would naturalize and vote is beyond me.

Japanese or not, your vote don't mean squat.

-9 ( +11 / -20 )

It was a hard decision. I love Japan,

the issue isn't about love or hate. Its about what's good for our children. That's the lens through which I'm looking.

. If I am going to be in any other country than Japan however, Canada is it.

I hear you. We are trying desperately to get there, but I don't think its going to happen.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

I'm impressed it's 16% to be honest I thought it will be between 0-0.1%

Beside if there are many "foreigners with temporary stay" then why not to limit voting rights to those with permanent residency and up?

You don't have to be genius to come with that solution.

-4 ( +7 / -11 )

What is the problem here? Why should foreign residents be allowed to vote

Forget legal residents, in the US, especially the blue states illegals are allowed to vote in mass, no id check required..

Forgive me if "because somewhere in America does that" doesn't come across as a valid reason for why the Japanese should do it.

8 ( +20 / -12 )

Foreign residents do not enjoy political rights in Japan because the ruling class, as in many countries, want to keep the "joker" card of toxic 20th century nationalism up their sleeve, that shameless shibboleth which they can always play to enhance their power by cajoling and scaring the electorate with tales of "outsiders and their ilk". "Can you use chopsticks?" is a question that won't go away any time soon if Japanese politicians have anything to do with it.

0 ( +10 / -10 )

If a permanent resident, of six years living, paying taxes, integrating into their community, learning the language etc.

Then they have earned the right to citizenship, a passport, retaining there current passport and nationally.

However they must swear a oath of allegiance without fear or favour.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Higher than I expected. Work , pay your taxes and be quiet.

-4 ( +9 / -13 )

So typical with everything else Japan does, always a ONE WAY STREET relations, take, take, take only.

So so true.

-8 ( +11 / -19 )

No surprise at all. I always know where I stand in Japan, just by where Japanese people choose not to sit.

-9 ( +7 / -16 )

These little stories always pop up and give some glimmer of hope that change is coming. Unfortunately, it's not. So, rather than be negative about the lack there of, I just live my life and take part in what I need to be an active community member. When the wife votes she always asks me for input on how I would vote - that's enough for me. I do agree, that citizenship would be one way to rememdy a lot fo the ills people feel toward Japan, but for some reason I won't do it. It's like I'd feel trapped or something, and I'm not sure people's perception of me would change either. I'm pretty sure if I lived in my home country I would be paying taxes and pension and probably not voting as much anyway. So, in the end just live and be happy.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

But no debate when it comes foreigners need to pay multiple tax and mandatory pension scheme in Japan.

Good point!

-7 ( +7 / -14 )

we are allowed to pay taxes as japanese citizens do.

we are not allowed to vote and discuss how and who will manage our taxes sent.

naisu.

-3 ( +12 / -15 )

we are allowed to pay taxes as japanese citizens do.

we are not allowed to vote

Yes you are, there is a path to citizenship that will let you vote. You just choose not to take it.

-1 ( +10 / -11 )

The solution is for Japan to follow the lead of more advanced and forward-thinking countries (such as South Korea) and allow for dual citizenship.

That would require Japan to become a more advanced and forward-thinking country...

I'm not holding my breath.

-13 ( +6 / -19 )

Comments here are laughable.

Remember, when they say "foreigners" they are not talking about the average American/French teacher, Vietnamese crop assistant, Filipino/Brazilian worker, etc. they are refering to the millions of Chinese/North Korean living in Japan plotting to implode it within inside everyday, Japan's geopolitic is way more complicated to understand than you can imagine (goes beyond relations with Imperial Japan/WW2).

Yes, let "foreigners" (aka Chinese and North Korean) vote, very wise decision.

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

Makes sense to me. Sometimes I get the feeling that a lot of foreigners are completely disengaged from their local communities. Really, how many ever join their local community association or participate in local event?

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Ha ha! Words fail me! 3 people as of now have thumbed down a post with a link that just provides information giving a global perspective!!!!!

-7 ( +5 / -12 )

Considering foreigners are second class citizens here it's not surprising. But the reality is with the declining birth rate and the massive loss to the workforce which is incoming, the Japanese government won't have a choice but to incentivize foreign residents to live here and have families here. In that scenario there is no option but to allow those people to vote or change the law that refuses dual citizenship.

-2 ( +8 / -10 )

Fighto!

Japan is the same as a majority of nations - you need to become a citizen in order to vote at any level.

Long term residents should absolutely take up citizenship if they wish to vote.

This is the argument many defenders of this system make. And, all things being equal, it would make perfect sense. However, all things are not equal concerning citizenship in Japan, as they require you to give up your current citizenship to acquire/ retain a Japan citizenship. Most non-Japanese are not willing to do that, nor should they be, as the majority of nations do not have such an antiquated and repressive rule.

Allowing permanent resident foreigners (not all foreigners) to vote only on local referendums is a reasonable compromise. Those referendums directly affect daily quality of life issues, without affecting the larger national policies of defense and diplomacy. So, no worry about foreigners from hostile nations voting against the interests of Japan in general.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

... but they take our tax money every year. Japan is such a modern country. Wow!

-8 ( +6 / -14 )

Long term residents should absolutely take up citizenship if they wish to vote.

why so they have to forfeit their current citizenship, sorry i dont even remotely see the valve of a J citizenship over the citizenship I currently have. my permanent J residency suits me just fine

-2 ( +9 / -11 )

why so they have to forfeit their current citizenship, sorry i dont even remotely see the valve of a J citizenship over the citizenship I currently have.

So your loyalty is higher towards another country than Japan.

This is exactly why they require citizenship to be able to vote. They want people who are making decisions for Japan, and only for Japan.

0 ( +9 / -9 )

actually, the foreigners (Koreans mainly) have already upped one on the Japanese. They just have a church that is tied to the ruling party in which a majority of the 1 party dictators have connections, so

who needs elections or the right to vote? what's the point?

-12 ( +5 / -17 )

The solution is for Japan to follow the lead of more advanced and forward-thinking countries (such as South Korea) and allow for dual citizenship.

Korea shouldn't want that to happen, as if the status quo remains, no foreigners would go to Japan, and they'd all go to Korea.

Why do you suppose foreigners still want to go to Japan when Korea is an option, and in your eyes, clearly superior?

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Personally don't think Im missing out that much by not being able to vote in the colour-coded extension of a school sports festival-style democracy that they play here, but the sentiment of only 16% does sting a little. Stay, pay, have families, help our youth internationalize and gain language skills, a more global mindset, but we are not interested in anything you personally may have to say about the direction society chooses to take. You don't have any skin in our game. So sorry. (not so deep bow) The concept and utility of 'reciprocity' needs to be checked and understood by everyone that wants to move forward.

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

Individuals without Japanese citizenship are not permitted to vote in elections,

As it should be..

If you are a foreigner and want to vote in Japan, get your citizenship, like the rest of the world.

-8 ( +5 / -13 )

Japan to allow "foreigners" (great majority mainland chinese and koreans, many loyal to Kim Jong Un) is akin to pre-war Ukraine to allow russian nationals to vote in their elections.

"But but...I pay my taxes!"

For god's sake, no wonder many people spend a decade here without even learning the language, hence having no idea of what kind of place they actually live in...mistaking Japan to other countries like Canada, Australia or US just because they are part of the same group of "First World" nations is laughable.

Breaking news: Japan is a very small asian nation surrounded by 1 billion people brainwashed everyday into hating and seeking its demise.

9 ( +17 / -8 )

The article is about the level of local referendums which are supposedly held for more critical/serious issues than subjects discussed by local assemblies. As actual examples of local referendums, Regarding construction of nuclear power plants in Niigata prefecture, Amendment on US-Japan Status of Force Agreement and relocation of US Base in Okinawa Prefecture、Osaka Capital transformation...Some legal binding and some other not (but must be respected under local politics). Technically speaking, legally binding local referendum could easily affect national level issues and even able to transform that local prefecture/municipality completely foreign, as a satellite city of some authoritarian nations nearby.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

So... One cannot blame any and all international people for the lack of of a good economy, increased crime rates, high suicide rates, bad educational systems, corrupt politicians, poor healthcare systems, and misguided military decisions among other issues [in Japan] since we are not enabled or granted the right to vote in anyway shape or form.

Understood.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

 but they take our tax money every year. Japan is such a modern country. Wow!

You're funny, paying taxes is the price of living in a country, just like in the modern USA, foreigners pay taxes but cannot vote without citizenship.. Wow!!.

Get it??..

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

Moonraker

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-citizen_suffrage

a ha! Words fail me! 3 people as of now have thumbed down a post with a link that just provides information giving a global perspective!!!!!

A very informative article. It's interesting that the US, which was founded on the presumption that "taxation without representation" is an injustice, is one of the worst offenders, granting permanent resident non-citizens voting rights in only a small handful of municipalities limited to school boards and local councils.

It's also interesting that, in Japan, the opposition parties, including LDP partner Komeito, wanted to allow PR's the right to vote in local elections, while LDP opposed it. As many have so often said, there is nothing liberal nor democratic about the Liberal Democratic Party.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Tax liability should equal voting right. Simple as that.

Why? Do you not use the roads, airports, public transport, hospitals, schools, police, courts etc? Most taxpayers get back more in government services than they pay in. You have to be quite wealthy to be a net contributor.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

I don't care, I pay more tax than most people but I don't think that gives me a right, as a non citizen, to vote. My J wife and I are on the same page when it comes to politics anyway.

6 ( +13 / -7 )

Long term residents should have the option for at least local elections since they contribute and are affected by the decisions more immediately. It only makes sense. That or they could wave foreigners for more things like taxes cause, why pay into a system that actively won’t let you be a part of it

4 ( +8 / -4 )

No country allows foreigners to vote.

-9 ( +6 / -15 )

The politicians who shut down foreign earnings and killed foreign livelihoods are now asking themselves whether foreigners should be considered to re-elect them so they can keep their jobs. - Never forget what they've done to good stand-up foreigners. -

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

The taxes you pay and whether that gives you a right to vote is a red herring. The fact is that 84% of these leaders either have no opinion or refuse to even think about your political participation. No matter how much you 'love' Japan, it is indifferent to you, except to extract your praise to fuel its cultural narcissism.

-6 ( +9 / -15 )

So long as reciprocity is not the guiding principle, Japan will continue to freeload on the privileges extended to resident foreigners elsewhere, while denying foreigners resident here the exact same rights. An antediluvian mindset that will not change so long as indulgent foreign governments continue to mollycoddle it and look the other way.

-6 ( +6 / -12 )

Your vote in Japan has 0 value, so who cares?

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

wallaceToday  12:48 pm JST

No country allows foreigners to vote.

Wrong.

Many countries do.

Start with Chile.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Give them an inch, they will try to get a mile!

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

It's the same in the US. If you're not a citizen, you can't vote - at any level.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

wallace

No country allows foreigners to vote.

Incorrect.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

It's the same in the US. If you're not a citizen, you can't vote - at any level.

Sorry but that is incorrect

As of 2014, no non-citizen was allowed vote in the United States for federal or statewide elections, though some local governments allowed non-citizens limited suffrage.[139] Before 1926, 40 states had at one point encouraged voting regardless of citizenship status.[140] Voting rights at the local level have also more recently been granted to non-citizens by some town governments, either for school boards or for municipal councils. Examples include: Barnesville (already since 1918), Martin's Additions and Somerset (since 1976), Takoma Park (since 1991) and Garrett Park (since 1999), Chevy Chase Section 3, Hyattsville, Mount Rainier, Riverdale Park, Glen Echo, Montpelier and Winooski (2021).

Non-citizen suffrage - Wikipedia

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Your vote in Japan has 0 value, so who cares?

Exactly. We are debating this as if Japan is a real democracy, and it isn't. The system is rigged to make sure the LDP wins every time. It doesn't matter.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Wrong.

Many countries do.

Start with Chile.

And Uruguay

Uruguay

Since 1952, 15-year residents have had national voting rights.

Non-citizen suffrage - Wikipedia

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Is there a single country that allows non citizens to vote? Permanent residence just means you are free to stay and the government has no intention to kick you out after a while, but you are still just a guest… start causing trouble and they can revoke it and send you back where you came from. If you want to vote then become a citizen.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Who Can and Can’t Vote in U.S. Elections

Who CAN’T Vote?

   Non-citizens, including permanent legal residents, cannot vote in federal, state, and most local elections.

https://www.usa.gov/who-can-vote

3 ( +6 / -3 )

The most extensive example of non-citizens voting is probably the UK. Citizens of any of the 30+ Commonwealth countries legally resident in the UK can vote.

https://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/running-electoral-registration-wales/eligibility-register-vote/what-are-nationality-requirements-register-vote/can-a-commonwealth-citizen-register-vote

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Since when money gives you right ro vote ?

Citizenship yes.

Many fooling ideas in comments.

To prove you wrong, some people because they are rich have plenty of dwellings in different countries. Would you accept they are allowed to vote because they get a card to stay in your country ?

Beware of simple looking solutions....

Voting is the ultimate power in a democracy. It was not given easily in not so far history.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

The US and Canada do not allow non-citizens to vote and so a PR holder I do not expect to be entitled to vote in election, either. However, as a PR resident it would be nice to be able to vote in referendums, to be able to have a small say especially when it comes to points regarding my child who is Japanese and as a single mother. Again, it should be only for those who are holding PR cards as clearly life is a long-term commitment when you hold that card.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Looks like 24% of assembly members are regular readers of the comments section on this website.

A foreigner whose understanding of Japan is sufficient enough to warrant the right to vote would understand why foreigners must never have the right to vote. 

If you're unaware of your level of awareness, signing up for MyNumber is automatic disqualification.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Other countries not allowing non citizens to vote is not the problem, the problem is that Japan doesn't allow dual citizenship. In most countries I have lived in, you live and work there for 5 years and you can become a citizen of that country, no need to do anything more.

PR is made in such a way that you will see no reason to go from PR to citizenship, because no one except maybe people that have fled war will give up a passport for the right to vote, because that is the only thing you gain.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

you'll take their money though. Hypocrites. Taxation without representation

-8 ( +4 / -12 )

they can't accept dual citizenship, it would prevent their war aggression

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Question: Why do most foreigners living in Japan actually run away from their own countries???

Answer: Because life in their own country isn’t good and terrible in many cases where they simply cannot make ends meet.

Question: Why is this so?

Answer: Because the leaders in their countries cannot run the country well.

Question: Who chooses these leaders?

Answer: They do.

Analysis: If foreigners living in Japan are given a chance to vote, they will want to change Japan and end result will be Japan will become like their own country, the very country they ran away from! Let the Japanese choose their own leaders and keep Japan the wonderful country it is. If we as foreigners don’t like how Japan is then we can always go back to our own countries or another country! Only Japanese people should vote…no foreigners voting rights!!!

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

In ancient Rome, foreigners who didn't have voting rights, did not have to pay tax either!

1 ( +5 / -4 )

If you call this home, and you want to vote. Become a Japanese citizen.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Aly RustomToday  03:48 pm JST

It's the same in the US. If you're not a citizen, you can't vote - at any level.

Sorry but that is incorrect

As of 2014, no non-citizen was allowed vote in the United States for federal or statewide elections, though some local governments allowed non-citizens limited suffrage.[139] Before 1926, 40 states had at one point encouraged voting regardless of citizenship status.[140] Voting rights at the local level have also more recently been granted to non-citizens by some town governments, either for school boards or for municipal councils. Examples include: Barnesville (already since 1918), Martin's Additions and Somerset (since 1976), Takoma Park (since 1991) and Garrett Park (since 1999), Chevy Chase Section 3, Hyattsville, Mount Rainier, Riverdale Park, Glen Echo, Montpelier and Winooski (2021).

Non-citizen suffrage - Wikipedia

And look at how that turned out!

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Does Japan allow for dual citizenship? In the US and some other countries, if you have dual citizenship you can vote in either country.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

In other words you are welcome to pay taxes but your votes are not welcome

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

And look at how that turned out!

Huh? Please be more specific.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

StrangerlandFeb. 24  07:21 am JST

What is the problem here? Why should foreign residents be allowed to vote?

Why shouldn't they? What useful, practical purpose does it serve to withold voting rights from them? The arguments I've seen against it are basically a mix of paranoia and emotive, wishy-washy clap-trap.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Why shouldn't they? What useful, practical purpose does it serve to withold voting rights from them? The arguments I've seen against it are basically a mix of paranoia and emotive, wishy-washy clap-trap.

well said Simon!

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Aly RustomToday  10:39 am JST

Why shouldn't they? What useful, practical purpose does it serve to withold voting rights from them? The arguments I've seen against it are basically a mix of paranoia and emotive, wishy-washy clap-trap.

well said Simon!

They are, it's like "you have to naturalise to prove your loyalty to the country." It doesn't prove anything. I think most naturalised citizens are still going to feel some degree of bias or loyalty to the countries they came from, and I bet that if a lot of Chinese or North Korean PRs in Japan became Japanese citizens their loyalty would still be in doubt. Why should PRs have to prove anything to people who are never going to trust or accept them no matter what nationality they have?

There's also "they might not vote in Japan's interests." Only Japanese citizens can be candidates in elections, which is right and fair, so that means PRs would be voting for candidates that didn't have Japan's interests at heart and therefore weren't "loyal." Why should PRs have to prove their loyalty when it's not required of politicians or election candidates?

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

There's also "they might not vote in Japan's interests." 

Which then begs the question WHY are there JAPANESE candidates running for office who do not have Japan's interests in the first place?

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

paying tax doesn’t mean you have the right to vote!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

hattorikunToday  12:30 pm JST

paying tax doesn’t mean you have the right to vote!

Why not? I can understand when people are prohibited from doing certain things because it would cause harm, e.g. anyone who wants to drive a car should pass the test, or else they might cause accidents. Anyone who wants to practice medecine should go to medical school and learn what to do, or else they will probably kill people by accident. Foreign permanent residents should acquire Japanese nationality if they want to vote in elections, or else... well, what, exactly?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

@simon Foston

Else propaganda and political steering becomes possible so easily.

One will inevitably take orientation of any political choice towards interest shared or more favorable to your home country, consciously or even unconsciously.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What difference would it make if you did vote against Japan's overall interest? The LDP has been working against the overall interest of the people for decades and the bureaucracy has connived against them too. No, the reason foreigners can't vote is because they are too aware of the system having not been sufficiently indoctrinated since birth.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Pay attention Jonathan Prin,

inflations runnin away here but funny thing is, you never see a price goin up for cheap votes.

But if we're actually talkin about the neighborhood Moon church of "propaganda and political steering" …

then I see yer point. When it comes to those guys "one will inevitably take orientation of any political choice towards interest shared or more favorable to you or your cult or your home country or you nameit … consciously or even unconsciously."

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

if it's no different then other countries then on a direct comparison level there's no reason to choose Japan as it doesn't have dual citizenship. No reason to live there as a foreigner. Japan will always attract people, but the higher level educated foreigner isn't going to be it when there are better options in other countries.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Voting should be left only to citizens who believe and love their country. Anyone who is really not a citizen may not understand the system well. Bad enough that citizens themselves do not. It's like asking someone outside the family to cook the family dish. If they have never had it before, you may be disappointed. Too many cooks spoil the broth. Meaning sometimes it is better to have one or a few people do a job than to have many people do it.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Maria 'Bing' Velasquez ReidToday  03:32 pm JST

Voting should be left only to citizens who believe and love their country.

What about citizens who don't believe or love their country?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

True. If you are keen to vote, go for the citizenship, like other countries.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Chico3Today  03:32 pm JST

True. If you are keen to vote, go for the citizenship, like other countries.

There are other countries allow dual citizenship.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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