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Kamikaze pilots say war horrors lost on young

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By Shingo Ito

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It is sad that the young generation often does not see the wrongs both Germany and Japan committed during the war. Nazi and Imperial Japan leaders were criminals. The atrocities committed should never be forgotten or respected in any way by anybody. The leaders are long gone and thank goodness for that.

17 ( +23 / -6 )

“It was crazy—I cannot support the idea of glorifying our mission,” the former navy pilot said of young men ordered to crash their planes into Allied ships.

Any sugar-coating of Japan’s wartime past was misplaced, said Akinori Asano, as he prepares to spend Aug 15 at home alone, mourning those who never made it back.

Voices of reason in Japan. Too bad for the country that age will soon catch up to them, and all that will be left are "leaders" like Abe.

9 ( +19 / -10 )

Fascism is becoming trendy among some of Japan's youth, eh?

Do these people really want to revert to a society where everyone was expected to give their life...for the emperor?!?

3 ( +14 / -11 )

This article is too full of items to comment on, to a degree that I can't comment without writing something five times longer than the original. So I'll just say one thing: I hope peace is ruthlessly wielded by more and more countries. Conflict has proven itself unable to arrive at lasting solutions.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

They're nothing better than these nut jobs that strap bombs to themselves and blow people up except they used a plane.

-8 ( +9 / -17 )

Spend money if we have any to promote a good relashionship with China rather than building up our defense against them.

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@mark

It is sad that the young generation often does not see the wrongs both Germany and Japan committed during the war. Nazi and Imperial Japan leaders were criminals. The atrocities committed should never be forgotten or respected in any way by anybody. The leaders are long gone and thank goodness for that.

Very true. A lot of lessons can be learned, but a lot is not. At least in Germany's case, having spent half of my younger years in Germany, there's always discussion about the war and Germans are very direct and forward and honest about their role and atrocities that the Nazis committed, unlike Japan, where you sometimes need to be careful when you engage the topic. One thing that many Germans find bizarre when they meet Japanese is when some say things with pride like both our countries were aligned and very similar culturally. Many Germans find comments like that strange, not to mention creepy. It would be nice if one day, when discussing the war with Japanese doesn't get many of them agitated that you can have a decent discussion with them, without anyone getting offended. We all should be at the point where we can all sit down as adults and discuss the past, so that we never have to go through anything like that in the future.

12 ( +16 / -4 )

The way Kamikaze pilots are revered in Japan is crazy and totally disconnected from reality. There was a fairly disturbing 'viral' ad campaign for the movie Eternal Zero in the tokyo metro a few months back. Some of you may have seen it.

As you rode up the escalator you would just see images of glorified kamikaze pilots and war time scenes. The problem (For me at least!) was that there was absolutely no reference at all to the movie, just the images. I actually had to explain what it was all about to two slightly puzzled French tourists riding the escalator. It looked as if Japanese people celebrate the imperial army on their way to work every morning. It was really embarrassing and quite shameful. It was the equivalent of riding the metro in Berlin and seeing posters of the Waffen SS without any indication that they were promoting a movie.

14 ( +20 / -6 )

Many Japanese share the same opinion as this guy. Many believe that Japan was stupid to try to take over Asia and to continue fighting with kamikaze after all their resources had been depleted. Sadly though, many Japanese also blame Chiba for the poor relations, but it takes two to tango. If neither side is prepared to compromise then relations are only going to get worse and quite possibly eventuate in military action. I'm glad to hear this veteran speaking out against the establishment, but I fear that Abe and his right-wing cronies have their own agenda, which is quite contrary to a peaceful resolution.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Camman80Aug. 14, 2014 - 07:30AM JST They're nothing better than these nut jobs that strap bombs to themselves and blow people up except they used a >plane

Members of a uniformed military crashing their planes by acting as the guidance system, into the military vessels of the enemy's navy in a time of war, is not comparable to terrorists hijacking a plane full of civilians and crashing it into an office building or blowing up large gatherings of civilians.

-1 ( +19 / -20 )

Ossan

...or nuking a city containing a lot of living people...

7 ( +13 / -6 )

It seems incredible that while we held Hitler and Mussolini, and their host of henchmen, personally responsible for bringing about World War II in Europe, many Americans have bought the belief that Emperor Hirohito bears no moral or actual complicity in Japan's policy of aggression in Asia and the opening sledgehammer blow of the Pacific War, the Pearl Harbor attack.

8 ( +14 / -6 )

The sad aspect is the lack of value the imperialist fascist command put on the lives of these young men, which was also zero? They were expendable.

16 ( +18 / -2 )

Members of a uniformed military crashing their planes by acting as the guidance system, into the military vessels of the enemy's navy in a time of war, is not comparable to terrorists hijacking a plane full of civilians and crashing it into an office building or blowing up large gatherings of civilians.

Ossan -- nonsense. Both are acts of terrorism by desperate forces driven by a fanatical belief in a faith-based ideology. Whether the combatants are in uniform or not makes no difference. Please stop trying to glorify something -- "by acting as the guidance system" -- that even the pilots themselves say should not be.

Very true. A lot of lessons can be learned, but a lot is not. At least in Germany's case, having spent half of my younger years in Germany, there's always discussion about the war and Germans are very direct and forward and honest about their role and atrocities that the Nazis committed, unlike Japan, where you sometimes need to be careful when you engage the topic. One thing that many Germans find bizarre when they meet Japanese is when some say things with pride like both our countries were aligned and very similar culturally. Many Germans find comments like that strange, not to mention creepy. It would be nice if one day, when discussing the war with Japanese doesn't get many of them agitated that you can have a decent discussion with them, without anyone getting offended. We all should be at the point where we can all sit down as adults and discuss the past, so that we never have to go through anything like that in the future.

bass -- brilliant post. Unfortunately, the vast majority of Japanese will never come in contact with a German, nor take the time to learn about the different manner in which the two countries have chosen to handle their history of atrocities. So the revisionist trend in Japan is likely to continue unabated.

2 ( +16 / -14 )

Offering your life to the service of your country is eternal heroism

-21 ( +11 / -32 )

I agree somewhat with this man, but I think he is missing another point. It is fine to say things like there should not be anymore wars, but in reality, that will not happen. He seems to forget that Japan will need young men (and women) that are willing ot defend Japan. Not to go fly planes into the enemy, but to take a stand and defend Japan. Today, you don't seem to have that many young people in Japan who are willing to want to serve their country by defending it. Not saying that they should revamp the old Imperial Army mentality, but should not be willing to just "give up" and let peace rule.

In an ideal world that would be nice, but the world is not ideal.

1 ( +10 / -9 )

“It is nonsense to ask why we obeyed orders and why we had to die—there was no room for saying ‘no,’” Asano said. “But it was not a movie. I’m afraid young people can’t imagine what it was like—all I can do is pray for peace.”

Well said from someone who when through one of the worst brainwash in human history.

Unfortunately, 70 year later the leaders of Japanese nationalists and revisionists such as Abe is still trying to glorify war criminals by visiting Yasukuni Shrine.

IMHO, Kamikaze pilots as we know now, in essence, were a bunch of j-govt organized suicide bombers. The sad part is that Kamikaze pilots are still well worshiped by Japanese people not just those right-wingers and nationalists. Case in point, when Japanese bid to have letters of farewell written by kamikaze pilots was rejected by the UN heritage body a few months ago, I noticed that none of Japanese news agencies and TV networks reported that news. It’s absolutely amazing to see voluntary censorship on t UN’s rejection in media. My only guess was that that must touch the nerve about how Japan as a whole when it came to Japanese national‘heroes’- Kamikaze pilots.

However, I’d respectfully disagree that today’s young Japanese are not the fools who would blindly believe the propaganda crafted and packaged by rightwing leaders and fight for a blood war for the warmongers.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

Well Abe can fly the plane himself!

Years ago, I went to the museum at Chiran. It was a disgrace that they used Buddhism to further their cause. Absolutely disgusting.

1 ( +9 / -8 )

Manong Rene - Offering your life to the service of your country is eternal heroism

Serving in the military is basically "offering" your life in the service of your country. However, military service shouldn't include having to "volunteer" for suicidal Banzai charges, Kamikaze andor "Cherry Blossom" missions,

4 ( +7 / -3 )

"Eternal heroism" my aunt. Wilfred Owen call it dolce decorum est, the old lie. He knew war and died in it. Were it not for his poetry he would have been forgotten like millions of his fellows. I knew a kamikaze pilot. After the war he went Left.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Amazing, this individual counters the stereotypes of all Japanese as ignorant, racist, xenophobic war mongers, continually white washing its past (especially those that were in the war).

1 ( +6 / -5 )

jerseyboyAug. 14, 2014 - 08:25AM JST

"Members of a uniformed military crashing their planes by acting as the guidance system, into the military vessels of the enemy's navy in a time of war, is not comparable to terrorists hijacking a plane full of civilians and crashing it into an office building or blowing up large gatherings of civilians."

Ossan -- nonsense. Both are acts of terrorism by desperate forces driven by a fanatical belief in a faith-based >ideology. Whether the combatants are in uniform or not makes no difference.

Nonsense. You obviously don't know the definition of terrorism. Or know anyone who serves or has served.

Please stop trying to glorify something -- "by acting as the guidance system" -- that even the pilots themselves say >should not be.

Nobody is "glorifying" anything, Please stop making stupid accusations.

zichiAug. 14, 2014 - 08:22AM JST The sad aspect is the lack of value the imperialist fascist command put on the lives of these young men, which was >also zero? They were expendable.

Agree 100%.

5 ( +16 / -11 )

Take the most anti-war war film and have young men watch it. Something like Platoon. They don't get the anti-war message. They will leave the theater thinking war is cool. Humans, especially males, are naturally violent for some reason. So even anti-war war films glorify war to them.

So we have to be careful how we present any anti-war message. We cannot combine it with images that war loving freaks loved, such as these kamikaze images. I mean, if you think about it, that is why those spiffy military uniforms and symbols were invented: to promote war.

And it does not work to denounce war on one hand and support soldiering and all the overblown "protecting your freedom" sloganeering on the other. You do that any you get what we have in America, the warringest nation on the planet spending a quarter of all money on war gear but in complete denial about it.

If young people are ever going to get it in this country, I am afraid peaceniks are just going to have to be a bit fascist and brainwash in the other direction, if we can call ruthlessly teaching the truth brainwashing. All those in support of kamikaze tactics were crazed idiots who did nothing to help Japan's war effort and nothing to help Japan's future in defeat. There were initial successes only because of the surprise. Once the surprise wore off those stupid, insane fascists were so blind they could not see why it was no longer working. Those sort of idiots are why Japan lost the war. And modern idiots are glorifying losers.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

"Amazing, this individual counters the stereotypes of all Japanese as ignorant, racist, xenophobic war mongers, continually white washing its past (especially those that were in the war)”

Actually, as you say -this guy and a lot of others who served on the front lines are not war mongers but turned strongly anti-war, in Japan as in other countries. The problem are the "ignorant ,xenophobic war mongers" that were born later, were never in the conflict, harp on with their denials and white washes and unfortunately too often occupy positions of power in politics and society.

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War huh. What is it good for? Absolutely nothing.

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Ossan, likewise, you clearly dont know anyone that serves or has served. While what jerseyboy's analogy based off religion is only somewhat correct, the point is that the kamikaze pilots are very similar to insurgents wearing vests destroying both hard and soft targets on or off the battlefield. They both have clearly crossed the line to the accepted rules of war. Combatants using their own bodies to destroy an objective or to accomplish a mission is not and never will be accepted in any facet. As aircrew I would accept the tactic of crashing my airframe into an enemy combatant. This kamikaze pilot and all other kamikaze pilots are an example of what should never be repeated.

-7 ( +6 / -13 )

As the 69th anniversary of the war’s end approaches on Friday, so too does an annual pilgrimage by Japanese politicians to Yasukuni shrine.

Yasukuni will be a zoo tomorrow (Friday, August 15), particularly if Abe should decide to make the pilgrimage. If you are heading into central Tokyo, be forewarned.

I visited the shrine on August 15th some years ago now. I remember there being lots of ultra-nationalist sound trucks, blaring militarist anthems, and a few very old vets along with younger right wingers wearing Japanese imperial uniforms. The experience was a bit unnerving, and significantly changed my perception of Japan.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

One reason why most kamikaze missions failed was that the planes used were relatively easy targets for Allied piston-engined fighters and ship antiaircraft guns. Even the much-dreaded Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka was a failure because the Mitsubishi G4M2 carrier plane was extremely vulnerable to Allied fighters.

We're very lucky the Kawanishi Baika (Plum Blossom) never made it to service. Powered by the single pulsejet probably launched from rough airstrips with JATO rockets or from concealed land catapults, the Baika would have approached the target at over 650 km/h at low altitude, which would have made interception by Allied piston-engined fighters very difficult.

In the end, to understand why the kamikaze force was created, you have to understand the State Shinto version of bushido code, which in many ways is not the bushido code during the time of the Tokugawa Shogunate. This resulted in a belief that the highest honor was to die in combat for the Emperor--and the kamikaze was an extension of that very belief. Alas, it ended up being a huge waste of military resources, as thousands of pilots and thousands of planes were lost with essentially no effect on the Allied advance against Japan during World War II.

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I recommend reading the story of ace pilot Saburo Sakai. His wiki page can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabur%C5%8D_Sakai A truly amazing man who became a strict Buddhist after the war. If you can't be bothered to read the whole thing at least read the last section 'Back to Civilian Life'.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Old men in Tokyo forcing young men to sacrifice their lives in vain. When the second nuke hit Nagasaki, they surrendered so that they wouldn't share the pain.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Ossan -- nonsense. Both are acts of terrorism by desperate forces driven by a fanatical belief in a faith-based ideology. Whether the combatants are in uniform or not makes no difference. Please stop trying to glorify something -- "by acting as the guidance system" -- that even the pilots themselves say should not be.

There are laws which govern warfare, and when the soldiers of either side disregard these laws, then they become terrorists. After the war, many Japanese and German officers were shot or hanged for failing to abide by the rules of war. Justice was less strenuoulsy applied to allied violators, but it was applied, and more than a few allied soldiers were executed by their own officers for their offences.

The suicide attacks themselves were no violation of law of war. But that Japanese officers continued away the lives of so many young men long after the inevibility of defeat was realized was certainly bad. Death was better than loss of pride, or so it was thought, but to send others to their deaths for the sake of pride was unforgiveable.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Manong Rene - Offering your life to the service of your country is eternal heroism

They did not offer their life. They received orders, They had bi choice.

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I saw that movie. I rather enjoyed it and didn't feel it was glorifying the kamikaze at all. The message I got was blind obedience without love is tragic. Also, the movie brought home the idea that those who suffered the war and those who didn't, the young, see the war very differently. Even those who experienced the war have conflicting views. Overall, I think the movie showed that the honor you hold for someone should be because they were brave, caring and sensible regardless of their task. People who were forced to do insane things like commit suicide to further their countries cause were made to be terrorists. (Similar to what is going on with a certain twisted religious outlook right now.) I would also like to point out that my view of Japan changed a lot when I heard interviews with certain veterans who actually supported their atrocities: they admitted them on camera! They appeared to have no remorse or shame. Why weren't these people put in prison or executed? Now, we hear about people glorifying the war and, although I liked that movie, I can see that some (young) people would miss the point. And they will fall into line, blind, be forced to do things against their better sense, forsake their families and their passions, and participate in another possibly fatal tragedy. The leadership is entirely responsible but we have to "guide" them by refusing to act stupidly.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Nonsense. You obviously don't know the definition of terrorism.

Ossan, actually I do, and it does not make any distinction between acts committed by those in uniform or not.

the use of violence and threats to intimidate or coerce, especially for political purposes.

And if you don't think the aim of the kamikaze program was to get inside the heads of the U.S. Navy personnel and attempt to intimidate then, then you are simply ignorent on the subject.

and mark.bannon has already called you out on:

Or know anyone who serves or has served.

But, since you raised the subject, my grandfather, father, and several uncles served in various branches during both WWI and WWII, and I served in the Navy during Nam, so please stop trying to make discussions personal when you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about.

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

well, i think japan's case will still be an academic one, one that needs more debates and more ideas, while german's case has already long gone and well settled in good faith. having open and honest discussions i think is the only way why humans are able to solve problems, thanks to the internet, it has revolutionise the way we discuss things.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

and a recent film glorifying kamikaze missions, are proof that the horrors of war have been lost on generations of younger Japanese

Lost?? The horrors of war committed by Japan have never been learnt or acknowledged, so hard to forget what you didn't learn! But yeah they sure know Hiroshima & Nagasaki.......... now kamikaze's being glorified, stupid beyond belief

And dead on the comments about talking about WWII with Japanese, you need to very careful because the vast majority here are simply unable to have a conversation about this kind of stuff, IF YOU DO you need to remember you risk the end of what ever relationship you have with the person so you have to walk on nails with J-spouses, J-friends, & you never know what tangent they will go off on.

This kind of thing isn't just about WWII it is about ANYTHING that is a bit heavy or Japan related, you can have people agree with 150% BUT if the point of view is negative about Japan...........watch out!

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

I agree somewhat with this man, but I think he is missing another point. It is fine to say things like there should not be anymore wars, but in reality, that will not happen. He seems to forget that Japan will need young men (and women) that are willing to defend Japan.

Actually, you are wrong. I don't think he has forgotten at all. Mr Kanbe said, “Kamikaze missions should never happen again, but peace does not come without costs. We can’t protect peace without defense. Prime Minister Abe appears to be in a hurry to make changes, but I understand what he is trying to do.”

This article seems like typical left wing journalism. Trying to spin a few comments from a tired, old man into some sort of repudiation of Mr Abe. Even the "money quote", around which the article bases a lot of its "commentary", and upon which most JT posters appear to have seized in order to continue their anti-Abe rants, is ambiguous, and almost certainly reprinted here intentionally out of context.

“Japan could go to war again if our leaders are all like Abe. I’m going to die soon, but I worry about Japan’s future.”

There are several interpretations possible, and unless we hear the original Japanese quote its difficult to tell if this comment is meant as an indictment of Mr Abe. Mr Kanbe appears to understand that peace isn't free, and aggression needs to be countered. Perhaps he means to say that Mr Abe is the type to not back away from aggression. Perhaps he means to say that politicians like Mr Abe should be balanced by those with different viewpoints. Or perhaps he just knows that Japan is facing real threats from hostile neighbors, and its only a matter of time until someone does something stupid.

I read this article as a condemnation of the glorification of war in general and kamikaze pilots in particular. Without a doubt Mr Kanbe's comments have been made in response to a movie, not in response to any specific policy of the Abe administration. No surprise though to see the socialists at JT reading what they want to read.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

@Manong Rene

Doozo...go ahead...great. I volunteer you to take the front line should any conflict break out. I would rather you than many of my Japanese friends in their teens, 20s or 30s take the first bullet or enemy fire in the gut. They have so much other potential so I value their lives too much for such a waste.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It's a matter of perception. Soldiers who went on 'suicide missions' for the allies are considered heroes in their respective countries.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Bravery, courage, hero, self-sacrifice, when applied to kamikaze these words are just tatemae. They had no choice and were subjected to brainwashing and beatings as training. Their letters home were censored and vetted but some journals survive that show truer feelings. It was hell for them and they cried for their mothers--not for the emperor--at night.

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Ossan: Jerseyboy is correct, and the acts the Kamikaze pilots committed are comparable to other terrorists flying planes into structures/people, o dropping nukes on hundreds of thousands of civilians. And yes, in Japan, MANY glorify the kamikazes. It's sad. When you see people who were actually there lamenting what happened and talking of the waste and folly of it all, and then you have Abe and supporters who want a "return" to a "strong Japan" or that think kamikaze pilots "are cool!"

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

Think of the damage of what ONE Kamikaze commercial, private, or military plane could do today if loaded with a nuclear strategic or tactical weapon and hidden by a legit filed flight plan.

A well-timed surprise attack, could destroy every air force on earth at once, and every major capital too.

Japan could use this to finally achieve its wanted and needed Hakko Ichiu dreams.

That probably explains why kamikaze are being glorified right now, to prepare the next generation for this, without alerting anyone.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

jerseyboyAug. 14, 2014 - 08:25AM JST "Members of a uniformed military crashing their planes by acting as the guidance system, into the military vessels of the enemy's navy in a time of war, is not comparable to terrorists hijacking a plane full of civilians and crashing it into an office building or blowing up large gatherings of civilians." Ossan -- nonsense. Both are acts of terrorism by desperate forces driven by a fanatical belief in a faith-based >ideology. Whether the combatants are in uniform or not makes no difference. Nonsense. You obviously don't know the definition of terrorism. Or know anyone who serves or has served. Please stop trying to glorify something -- "by acting as the guidance system" -- that even the pilots themselves say >should not be. Nobody is "glorifying" anything, Please stop making stupid accusations. zichiAug. 14, 2014 - 08:22AM JST The sad aspect is the lack of value the imperialist fascist command put on the lives of these young men, which was >also zero? They were expendable. Agree 100%.

I totally agree with you, OssanAmerica.

Japanese people are just feeling very sorry for the young lives that were lost before enjoying their truely happy days, because of the imperialism or militarism overwhlming at that time. We are not glorifying them, but who could disgrace them who tried to defend their home country with their lives in the midst of war?

Feeling sympathy for them never means a resurgence of militarism. In fact, quite the opposite is true.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

The Germans, the Japanese, the Americans with the native peoples, the British with India, the French with Africa, the Spanish with south and Central America, the Chinese and Russians with themselves.

The pilot, IMO is warning against the evil governments do. How did this turn into Kamikaze/terrorism debate is laughable. Many pilots died for their country, so they are heroes to the Japanese. Respecting their sacrifice is OK, but no, they should not be glorified. And as one poster put it, how can it be "lost" if was never internalized in the first place.

So now the Sunnis and and Shia are running mad, or are they just fighting against western installed puppets. So is Putin the evil warmonger, or just trying to stop Americas hegemonic plans to desperately save the petro dollar.

War will never end until the root of it is made irrelevant.

Best anti war movie was Charlie's the great dictator, platoon, not so much.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I just cannot understand those that tend to give admiration to those that gave up their lives for a cause that wasn't 'honorable' nor 'respectable'. Some may argue that they had no choice but to follow order even though they didn't agree with the cause, but if both choice led to their death, why is it still admirable that they followed order? Seems it's more honorable that they died for their own belief than what was forced onto them.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

if both choice led to their death, why is it still admirable that they followed order? Seems it's more honorable that they died for their own belief than what was forced onto them.

Because if they refused, they weren't the only ones who copped it; their families would also suffer.

I don't admire the kamikaze pilots; I feel sorry for them.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

they were soldiers..warriors..aiming their planes on enemy soldiers. dont insult them by saying they are no different to terrorists

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jerseyboyAug. 14, 2014 - 11:29AM JST

You definitely do not know the definition of a terrorist. A soldier who terrifies his enemy is NOT a terrorist, though you seem to think he is. If your definition were correct, any good US soldier who served in "Nam" would have been a terrorist, for he would have surely terrified his enemy.

A terrorist is a criminal who indiscriminately kill a large number of innocent civilians. A soldier who kills enemy during war is not a terrorist, even though he terrifies his enemy.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

M3M3M3... you can't really compare the Waffen SS to the Imperial Army. Waffen SS were volunteers (a sizeable number from other countries, such as Ukraine and France) who were fanatical Nazis. The Imperial Army was made up, as most armies were at the time, of conscripts. Yes you had fanatics akin to the SS and Gestapo, but you can't just paint them all with the same brush. It's like saying all US soldiers in the Vietnam war were baby killers and rapists... they weren't, but that's how they were portrayed by the propagandists.

Kamikaze pilots on the other hand WERE volunteers, so by extension fanatics... anyone willing to fly what was in effect a suicide bomb at a ship was a fanatic.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I wonder who came up with such idea?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

CH3CHO: "You definitely do not know the definition of a terrorist."

People use it all the time when someone goes against their arguments and beliefs, and that's part of the point in using the word.

"A soldier who terrifies his enemy is NOT a terrorist, though you seem to think he is."

Ask the terrorists what they call themselves, or people that support them, and you'll hear something very much what you just said, with many calling Ukranian separatists "terrorists", and others calling them "freedom fighters" (on this site, to boot!), as just one example.

"A terrorist is a criminal who indiscriminately kill a large number of innocent civilians. A soldier who kills enemy during war is not a terrorist, even though he terrifies his enemy."

So you admit the dropping of the atomic bombs were acts of terrorism. Thank you.

There are most certainly differences between the motivation for acts of terrorism, but people that glorify men who decided to take their lives and the lives of others in planes or human torpedoes are ultimately the same as those who strap bombs to their chests in a sort of 'jihad'. The worst are the people and films that romanticize such things, and there are enough of them here.

These old guys that were actually there and are trying to tell of the horrors -- not glory -- or war need to be heard, and everyone needs to listen.

-11 ( +1 / -12 )

smithinjapanAug. 14, 2014 - 05:23PM JST

It seems you are painting yourself to the corner. What is your definition of terrorists?

It is a rhetorical question, for I know you cannot answer that question.

It seems you have hard time distinguishing soldiers from terrorists. They are clearly defined in law of armed conflict.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

so victorious countries didn't commit a war crime?

2 ( +7 / -5 )

Fouxdefa at Aug. 14, 2014 - 01:19PM JST Bravery, courage, hero, self-sacrifice, when applied to kamikaze these words are just tatemae. They had no choice and were subjected to brainwashing and beatings as training.

They also have to take methamphetamine

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

There is much about those years that the young in Japan do not know. In Germany it is official policy to educate the young about German war crimes, so as to avoid repeating history.

We had an ex-kamikaze pilot working at one of the places that I used to work. He, like about 10% of all kamikaze pilots, decided not to kill himself, and instead landed his plane on an aircraft carrier and surrendered. After the war he was allowed to emigrate to America, since returning to Japan would have been suicide, ironically.

The number of kamikaze pilots who did not want to commit suicide was high, or else why else would their cockpits have been welded shut before takeoff?

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

i feel lucky that i know & have known Germans & Japanese . i like 'em both . but to compare their knowledge of WW2 is insane . very basically Germans knew & felt bad (not need to if you weren't there!) very basically Japanese had absolutely no idea , i was staggered to find that out

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

jerseyboyAug. 14, 2014 - 11:29AM JST

You definitely do not know the definition of a terrorist. A soldier who terrifies his enemy is NOT a terrorist, though you seem to think he is. If your definition were correct, any good US soldier who served in "Nam" would have been a terrorist, for he would have surely terrified his enemy.

A terrorist is a criminal who indiscriminately kill a large number of innocent civilians. A soldier who kills enemy during war is not a terrorist, even though he terrifies his enemy.

CH#CHO -- as smith and thunderbird have commented already, I won't be redundant, but IMO, you are defining a terrorist by the modern definition that has developed during the "war on terror", and want to distinguish between soldiers and those not in uniform. Again, IMO, this is all a semantic/legal argument. As vile as his acts were, bin Laden considered himself a soldier even though he was not in uniform. But, IMO, he was also a terrorist by my definition -- which is that any time an act is primarily aimed at striking terror into the hearts and minds of the enemy, rather than significant damage/destruction of a militray target or personnel, that is terrorism. And, yes, by that definition, acts by soldiers in Nam were primarily terrorist in nature. That does NOT make them war criminals, it simply says that the nature of the act, and its intended outcome, were not as much for physical damage as it was psychological -- to terrorize. Terror has long been a part of war, and will continue to be, as it is a valid and effective strategy, but simply because the people behind those acts are in uniform, does not make them "terrorists".

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

To compare Germany and Japan in terms of their knowledge of WW2 is insane. Looking back you have two countries totally different cultures one semi open to express the way they feel and one TOTALLY monolithic in the countries thinking and ideology! Even today if you try to talk politics with most Japanese they don't even know what is going on in the country and those that do have some idea are right wing fruit cakes. Germany that is a totally different scenario it was too long ago that the Berlin wall was torn down so most Germans can talk about war and it remnants but most young Japanese and their parents just don't talk!!

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

kamikaze pilots are not terrorists. They are service member of State military.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

most young Japanese and their parents just don't talk!!

Because Japan was completely beaten and they don't want to talk about it. It's pointless to compare the two different countries with different circumstances.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

SaitamaRefugee Japanese read lots of books and know a great deal. Germany don't have neighbors like you, that is the biggest difference of Germany and Japan.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

"Kamikaze pilot Yutaka Kanbe should have died nearly seven decades ago.

It was only Tokyo’s surrender on August 15, 1945, that saved him from the fate of thousands whose suicide missions came to define Japan’s unrelenting pursuit of victory in the closing stages of World War II."

The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki saved Kanbe.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Another day another attempt Correct.by the 50 cent army at clouding the minds of people without a conscience. A quick look around dictionaries will tell you that terrorists aim at creating fear/terror by targeting non combattant enemies, in other words, civilians.

sangetsu03

There are laws which govern warfare, and when the soldiers of either side disregard these laws, then they become terrorists.

Correct. And these laws/rules of engagement/Geneva convention dictate roughly that civilians should not be targeted. For those who think all is fair in war, others agree with you and are called "freedom fighters" by their countrymen.

The Kamikaze were just an awful waste of their best resources from the strategic perspective: throwing their talented pilots at military hardware was definitely not the best idea. On the other hand, kids growing in times of peace become apathetic and lose any sense of patriotism. They need to be reminded that they're enjoying peace today because their ancestors made the sacrifice of their lives for it. In other words, don't ridicule the courage of those pilots; the people who ordered them at the highest level were the guilty ones.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

tinawatanabe at Aug. 14, 2014 - 10:38PM JST

SaitamaRefugee Japanese read lots of books and know a great deal. Germany don't have neighbors like you, that is the biggest difference of Germany and Japan.

So, Japan reads a ”great deal more” and that is the difference? First off, that is a lie, but even assuming that is true, what difference does it make how many books Japanese. Ridiculous.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Comments by Japanese soldiers when ordered Pilots had no choice. For many years what they wrote to their families were hidden but way later the War was over, gradually revealed. Some are in USA, some are in museums, /these pilots had no choice. 9yui-gon-sho)

''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

I cannot predict the outcome of the air battles, but you will be making a mistake if you should regard Special Attack operations as normal methods. The right way is to attack the enemy with skill and return to the base with good results. A plane should be utilized over and over again. That's the way to fight a war. The current thinking is skewed. Otherwise, you cannot expect to improve air power. There will be no progress if flyers continue to die.

Lieutenant Commander Iwatani, Taiyo (Ocean) magazine, March 1945.

Zwei Seelen wohnen auch in mein[em] Herz[en]!! (Ah, two souls [tamashi’i] reside in my heart [kokoro]!!) After all I am just a human being. Sometimes, my chest pounds with excitement when I think of the day I will fly into the sky. I trained my mind and body as hard as I could and am anxious for the day I can use them to their full capacity in fighting. I think my life and death belong to the mission. Yet, at other times, I envy those science majors who remain at home [exempt from the draft]. … One of my souls looks to heaven, while the other is attracted to the earth. I wish to enter the Navy as soon as possible so that I can devote myself to the task. I hope that the days when I am tormented by stupid thoughts will pass quickly.

Sasaki Hachir

It is easy to talk about death in the abstract, as the ancient philosophers discussed. But it is real death I fear, and I don’t know if I can overcome the fear. Even for a short life, there are many memories. For someone who had a good life, it is very difficult to part with it. But I reached a point of no return. I must plunge into an enemy vessel. To be honest, I cannot say that the wish to die for the emperor is genuine, coming from my heart. However, it is decided for me that I die for the emperor.

Hayashi Ichizo

I am pleased to have the honour of having been chosen as a member of a Special Attack Force that is on its way into battle, but I cannot help crying when I think of you, Mum. When I reflect on the hopes you had for my future ... I feel so sad that I am going to die without doing anything to bring you joy.

Ichizo Hayashi, last letter home a few days before his final flight. April 1945

2 ( +4 / -2 )

mark.bannonAug. 14, 2014 - 09:53AM JST Ossan, likewise, you clearly dont know anyone that serves or has served.

Incorrect.

While what jerseyboy's analogy based off religion is only somewhat correct, the point is that the kamikaze pilots are >very similar to insurgents wearing vests destroying both hard and soft targets on or off the battlefield. They both have >clearly crossed the line to the accepted rules of war.

Show me under which convention the act of deliberately crashing your plane into the enemy is deemed "illegal" under the rules of war and whether it was in place in 1944.

Combatants using their own bodies to destroy an objective or to accomplish a mission is not and never will be >accepted in any facet.

Of course it will never be accepted. However, Uniformed service members fighting the uniformed service of an enemy in time of war, regardless of whether they drop a bomb or crash their planes, is IN NO WAY COMPARABLE to terrorists that are NOT a uniformed state military, conducting oftentimes undeclared warfare on civilian targets. You people who can't seem to tell the difference are a disgrace to the men and women who serve and protect your ignorant rear ends.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

SaitamaRefugee My point is you learn history by lots of readings or watching documentaries, not so much by talking with your parents. The difference bet Japan and Germany is that Germany doesn't have China and SKorea as neighbors.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

This is a warning that Japan refuses to learn from history, even from those who actually lived it, and the void created means youth have no idea that they are being used.

Thank you Kanbe-san and Kagawa-san for speaking up, one can always hope people will listen.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Offering your life to the service of your country is eternal heroism

Not when "the service of your country" is forced upon you in order to maintain a fascist dictatorship run by an elite group. Tojo's final statements when he apologized for the atrocities committed by the Japanese military showed he knew exactly what had taken place throughout the war and no one should try to whitewash or glorify any aspect of the Japanese Imperial Army's actions.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

A plane should be utilized over and over again.

Toshiko, Japan was losing the war. Japan did not have food, oil or material to build decent planes. What's the point of criticizing their mentality now? All Japanese know Japan did a stupid war. Why do you have to keep criticizing Japan?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

CH#CHO -- as smith and thunderbird have commented already, I won't be redundant, but IMO, you are defining a terrorist by the modern definition that has developed during the "war on terror", and want to distinguish between soldiers and those not in uniform. Again, IMO, this is all a semantic/legal argument. As vile as his acts were, bin Laden considered himself a soldier even though he was not in uniform. But, IMO, he was also a terrorist by my definition -- which is that any time an act is primarily aimed at striking terror into the hearts and minds of the enemy, rather than significant damage/destruction of a militray target or personnel, that is terrorism. And, yes, by that definition, acts by soldiers in Nam were primarily terrorist in nature. That does NOT make them war criminals, it simply says that the nature of the act, and its intended outcome, were not as much for physical damage as it was psychological -- to terrorize. Terror has long been a part of war, and will continue to be, as it is a valid and effective strategy, but simply because the people behind those acts are in uniform, does not make them "terrorists".

I don't know jerseyboy. It seems like you are AGREEING with Ossan and CH3CHO or you are simply making up your OWN convenient definition to suit your position.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Offering your life to the service of your country is eternal heroism

''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

Soldiers who were not pilots at that time could not offer to become kamikaze pilots. Army dictated all military operation, then, Offering their service? Japan was not a democrat.ic country, Just Army bossing totalitarian country, No one could offer their service to become pilots.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

There are checks and balances so I'm not so worried about Abe. And I don't see most Japanese wanting to send the SDF overseas either. But I have to agree, unless you've been in a war you can't imagine it. Even movies can't convey the reality.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I recently saw a National Press Club where Mr Abe flat-out denied to acknowledge Japan invaded & colonized Korea and China. Abe said judging or acknowledging History is not his job as a PM or a Politician... he said "that is the job for the Historians." Mr.Abe is completely delusional and twisted with his Imperialistic idealism who will gladly defend Japan in unnecessary conflict with the lives of your brothers, sons and fathers without even batting an eye.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@tinawatanabeAUG. 15, 2014 - 12:02AM JST A plane should be utilized over and over again.

Toshiko, Japan was losing the war. Japan did not have food, oil or material to build decent planes. What's the point of criticizing their mentality now? All Japanese know Japan did a stupid war. Why do you have to keep criticizing Japan?

''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

That is neither my comment nor criticizing Japan. It was the comment posted in a magazine by a Japanese Air Force Officer, not me. Read carefully before you use your habit of jumping to criticize me.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Has anybody seen this movie "Eternal Zero"? I'm curious to know how it portrays the Imperialist J-Government.

@Jerseyboy: I can't help but think that you're treading on thin ice here. In one post you say this:

Ossan -- nonsense. Both are acts of terrorism by desperate forces driven by a fanatical belief in a faith-based ideology.

...and then in another you say this:

Terror has long been a part of war, and will continue to be, as it is a valid and effective strategy...

Other than the fact that you're contradicting yourself, the "definition" of terrorism is beside the point; I believe the point that Ossan was making is that Kamikaze pilots are not the same as "people" who blow up civillians in a public location, or hijack a commercial flight and fly it into a non-military structure full of civillians. Camman80 on the other hand, stated they are the same.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Toshiko, Japan was losing the war. Japan did not have food, oil or material to build decent planes. What's the point of criticizing their mentality now? All Japanese know Japan did a stupid war. Why do you have to keep criticizing Japan?

Because you don´t get it. YOU need to study history.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

If you are interested in Kamikaza movies, there were. Also, there are documentqary type history books (none fiction)''

Saigo no Tokkoutai The Last Kamikaze in English), released in 1970, produced by Toei,

Toei also produced a biographical film about Takijirou Ounishi in 1974 called AaKessen Koukuutai Father of the Kamikaze in English)

Last Kamikaze Testimonials from WWII Suicide Pilots (Watertown, MA: Documentary Educational Resources, 2008).

Risa Morimoto, Wings of Defeat (Harriman, NY: New Day Films, 2007) . Ore wa, kimi no tameni koso (2007, For Those We Love in English).

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Surviving American military who served in the Pacific and observers repeatedly expressed astonishment at the concept of the kamikaze bombers, considering it an extreme anomaly of human behavior. They never pause to compare such heroic behavior with that of the young U.S. Marines and soldiers who waded ashore. For some reason, we cannot equate this in any form with the sacrifice the volunteer Japanese kamikaze pilots made to destroy their opponents. In other words, there is little difference in what the soldiers of each side underwent. There are only differences in perceptions. At the time, people in the U.S. were taught to accept that the Asian people held life cheaply, not only the lives of others, but also those of their own. Although behaviors differ within cultures, basic human emotions remain very much the same, no matter the group.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Can we all just agree that war in any form I idiotic.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Toshiko, You are refering it as criticism, aren't you? Japanese know all those things by TV programs, publications, newspapers, etc we have to hear and read almost everyday all our lives. We all know how stupidly they operated the army.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Surviving American military who served in the Pacific and observers repeatedly expressed astonishment at the concept of the kamikaze bombers, considering it an extreme anomaly of human behavior.

The Germans had their own version of Kamikaze pilots. "Sonderkommando Elbe was the name of a World War II Luftwaffe task force assigned to bring down Allied bombers by ramming German aircraft into them mid-air, with the desperate strategic aim of causing the Royal Air Force and the United States Army Air Forces to halt or at least reduce their air campaign against Germany. Despite the grim prospects of survival of such a mission, the unit was not a true "suicide unit" in that. unlike Japanes Kamikaze, the German pilots were expected to either attempt to bail out just before colliding with the Allied aircraft, or attempt to bail out after colliding."

More info about Sonderkommando Elbe is available at http://www.kaiserslauternamerican.com/german-kamikaze-pilots-in-world-war-ii/

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Japanese are not glorifying the Kamikaze attacks. If you read those Kamikaze pilots letters, you'll see their sadness and resignation. But nothing wrong to see them as heroes now.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

@tinawatanabeAUG. 15, 2014 - 05:42AM JST Toshiko, You are refering it as criticism, aren't you?

''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

Crticism to what? I just pasted the comment of an AF Officer.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The comparison between Germany and Japan is of course obvious, but it can be misleading. The differences should be noted: The Nazis in Germany represented an alien ideology in that country and were opposed by many people from the get go (with any luck, Hitler might not have surived the several assassination attempts on him.). They were not a continuation of Germany history but something completely different, which they accentuated. The created their own flag, their own anthem, their own terminology, their own mythology. It is easy to be German and disassotiate oneself from Nazism. Japan on the other hand fought for its own emperor, the one it still has, with all its symbols intact. The only change that happened that the emperor gave up the divinity. So to condemn Imperial japan is much taller order than to condemn the Nazi regime. People should keep that in mind when making these simple comparisons.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The box-office hit sees a top navy pilot refuse to take part in a suicide mission because he promised his wife that he would return home alive. But the pilot eventually agrees to the death sentence, leaving a comrade to take care of his family.

Box-office hit? Doesn't take much for a movie to be a "hit" when it has only grossed somewhere in the neighborhood of 50 million (US).

0 ( +1 / -1 )

"But a film called “The Eternal Zero”, based on a best-selling novel, catapulted the squadrons back into the minds of the public earlier this year."

There have been many Kamikaze movies, a long stream of them, and all the ones I have seen have presented the pilots as heros. E.g.

Gekkou no Natsu (summer of the moonlight sonata) (1993) Very sentimental but good. Kimi wo Wasurenai / Fly Boys, Fly! (1995) - Imho sentimental dross but featuring SMAP's prettiest, Kimura Takuaya.

My favourite was "The Winds of God" (1995 ), based upon the celebrated New York stage play of the same name, about a couple of Oosaka comedians that time slip into a kamikaze camp in the last days of the war, who at first say "You have got to be joking" but end up making the sacrifice. It shows the sexual/romantic motivation since the motivation of one of the two (ex-) comedians was the love of his (new/old?) wartime girlfiend.

Kamikaze pilots were major heros before they died. I also read a local history book published (only locally) in Tsuchiura City in Chiba Prefecture. Tsuchiura like many other towns, has to this day a sizeable red-light sleeze area. The history bok included a reminiscence by an ex prostitue who wrote that the Kamikaze pilots were somewhat sad but glowingly attractive idols who, the writer said, all the prostitues were happy to serve for free.

Their last letters - which I believe to have been trained to a considerable extent -- make me weep buckets. There are lots on the web. Here are some in English. http://www.kamikazeimages.net/writings/

0 ( +3 / -3 )

There are more than 100 theaters in my area but there is no Kamikaze movies so I checked box office data in USA.

'Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' clobbers 'Guardians' with $65 million box-office opening

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Manong ReneAUG. 14, 2014 - 08:26AM JST

Offering your life to the service of your country is eternal heroism.

Totally agree.

FouxdefaAUG. 14, 2014 - 01:19PM JST

Bravery, courage, hero, self-sacrifice, when applied to kamikaze these words are just tatemae. They had no choice and were subjected to brainwashing and beatings as training.

They were volunteers and they were well-trained for their missions to defend Japan by ultimate price. This is called a heroism.

tinawatanabeAUG. 15, 2014 - 07:48AM JST

But nothing wrong to see them as heroes now.

Yes. Nothing wrong for every wise and sane person.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@Yubaru: The movie mentioned is not in Box Office list at all.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@sfjp330AUG. 15, 2014 - 05:07AM JST

Surviving American military who served in the Pacific and observers repeatedly expressed astonishment at the concept of the kamikaze bombers, considering it an extreme anomaly of human behavior. They never pause to compare such heroic behavior with that of the young U.S. Marines and soldiers who waded ashore.

Surviving Americans aren't the reference group to consider whether it was an anomaly of human behavior or not. Besides Americans, there were many servicemen from many countries of all parts of the world who defended their land by paying an ultimate price.

@ToshiYoriAUG. 15, 2014 - 06:44AM JST

The Germans had their own version of Kamikaze pilots. "Sonderkommando Elbe was the name of a World War II Luftwaffe task force assigned to bring down Allied bombers by ramming German aircraft into them mid-air, with the desperate strategic aim of causing the Royal Air Force and the United States Army Air Forces to halt or at least reduce their air campaign against Germany.

During World War II Soviets performed much more successful aerial ramming attacks than Germans.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerial_ramming

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Japan should stick to its pacifism and its pacifist constitution that abolished "Kousen-ken"(right of belligerence) absolutely stubbornly. I still wonder if those who propose collective defense forgot the miserable experience of Japan several decades ago. Such a miserable history must never be repeated.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

So I want to say a little about Kamikaze.

In Russia they are well known by everyone

The word KamikaDze ( so we pronounce this word ) is a part of Russian launguage

In Russian historical literature there are two opinions :

1 a tragedy of young men who should die without any other option

2 a heroic represantation of a national spirit

You know - Russian has almost as much respect toward Army and Navy as Prussian

Millionaire in Russian never sounds as pompously as General.

Almoust whole Russian history most respectful person was officer and not the clerk or businesman

So for lot of Russian Kamikaze - it's a little bit crazy but positive

To die for Motherland it quite a good deed (integral part of Russian national culture)

3 And of cause nobody praise Japanese Imperial Governement which brought things to a such situation

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@OlegekAUG. 18, 2014 - 03:50PM JST

So for lot of Russian Kamikaze - it's a little bit crazy but positive

The first known aerial ramming was performed by Pyotr Nesterov in 1914. Also I saw videos of heroic songs, written in Slavic languages and dedicated to Kamikaze units.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@night knight

During 1941 (hard time for Red Army)

Luftwaffe was very strong at this time

And Kamikaze tactics was used in Russian Air Force

(it was always individual crew choice)

Hundreds of Russian pilots took such decision in difficult situation

They made "special attacks " against German bombers or troop column

When you have a lot of not so good trained BUT patriotic pilots and enemy coming closer

it's became normal

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Very true. A lot of lessons can be learned, but a lot is not. At least in Germany's case, having spent half of my younger years in Germany, there's always discussion about the war and Germans are very direct and forward and honest about their role and atrocities that the Nazis committed, unlike Japan, where you sometimes need to be careful when you engage the topic.

In the 60s and 70s it wasn't exactly easy to find the concentration camps in Germany. Things changed in the late 70s and 80s. Many people think a lot of it was because of German participation in NATO really forced the dialog. They had to count on the member nations to stick together to defend against the Soviets. For whatever reason that hasn't happened Japan even with the large US presence.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The object of war is not to die for your country, it's to make the other poor bastard die for his country.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I won't deny that the horrors of war are lost on many young people, but fortunately some possess the sense not to glorify it. I can't begin to imagine the Hell some of these Kamikaze pilots went through in deciding whether or not to commit suicide for their country. No matter what decision they made, it must have been the hardest choice they were ever faced with. For many, I should imagine, the prospect of martyrdom was not compelling enough to abandon their loved ones, but what was the alternative? Execution? In a choice between a kamikaze mission and execution, I expect the suicide bombing was the decisive choice, for the reason of these pilots wanting to have at least some control over how their life ended, rather than none at all. I'm disappointed that the campaign to have the kamikaze pilots' farewells added to the UN register ended in failure. The current generations and future generations could learn a lot from the preservation of those letters. We cannot afford to see another war like that, and I sincerely hope that no country ever resorts to using kamikaze missions again either.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Droll Quarry

The object of war is not to die for your country, it's to make the other poor bastard die for his country.

US ( like Italy ) has no serious military expirience

To survive or to die

UK has like Germany Russia or Japan

It's a BIG difference

1 ( +2 / -1 )

All nations have sent soldiers on missions deemed "suicide missions". The allies put a bomb on a ship and rammed u boat stations, the entire crew knew it was a suicide mission. The German Sonder Kommand Elbe rammed bombers with their fighters, US sherman tanks were put in groups in three because two would be destroyed while the third circled behind Tiger tanks. Kamikaze were a product of their time, brave kids, victims of greed.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Kamikaze pilots were HEROES. Eternal Glory to them. Period.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

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