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3 dead, 306 injured in 33 prefectures by typhoon-strength storm

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A typhoon-strength storm brought travel chaos to Japan on Tuesday, as violent winds and rain killed at least three people, injured 306 and left tens of thousands of people stranded in 33 prefectures.

Gusts of up to 150 kilometers per hour have been recorded in western Japan, with coastal areas likely seeing even stronger winds, Japan's weather agency said.

At least 163 people suffered injuries across the country, knocked over by sudden gusts or hit by flying debris, public broadcaster NHK said.

With the agency warning of possible tornadoes in the western part of Japan, airlines grounded over 550 flights and a number of train services were suspended.

An 81-year-old man died in central Toyama prefecture when the wind blew over a shed, trapping him underneath, police said.

In Kagawa Prefecture, Shikoku, a 69-year-old woman was crushed to death when a warehouse collapsed, police said.

Forecasters said an expanding low pressure system in the Sea of Japan (East Sea) was forcing a cold front over the country, where it was bringing heavy rains and strong winds.

"This is like the core of a typhoon, but it is staying for a long time, whereas a typhoon usually moves rather quickly," a spokesman for the Japan Meteorological Agency said, adding that it was a "rare" situation.

The meteorological agency said on its website the strong winds would move northwards into Wednesday, producing waves up to 10 meters high.

"In particular, ferocious winds are expected at sea (in the north) on the Sea of Japan side. Please be extremely wary of violent winds and high waves."

The agency also warned heavy rain could trigger landslides and flooding.

Japan Airlines canceled 288 domestic and seven Asia-bound flights, affecting more than 32,000 passengers.

All Nippon Airways grounded 336 domestic flights, affecting nearly 40,000 people.

East Japan Railways, which operates a vast train network in the eastern and northern regions, including Tokyo, cancelled some commuter lines and a number of long-distance services.

The nation's main bullet train, linking Tokyo and Osaka, was experiencing delays after a brief suspension, but was running as of early evening.

A number of trucks were blown over by the winds, creating localised traffic jams in Toyama prefecture.

NHK also reported a recently-constructed 10,000-ton tanker, which was moored off Ehime Prefecture, had run aground.

A train, carrying some 170 passengers, was stranded on the Seto-Ohashi Line for seven hours due to heavy winds on a bridge linking the main islands of Honshu and Shikoku, the network said.

Many companies sent employees home early. Canon told about 14,000 workers mostly in Tokyo and neighbouring Kanagawa prefecture to leave before the storm worsened.

"Most of them use public transportation to commute. The rain isn't so strong yet (in Tokyo) but the storm is likely to intensify and could disrupt train and other services," said company spokesman Hirotomo Fujimori.

Fujitsu permitted 25,000 employees in Tokyo and neighbouring prefectures to go home early if they wish, according to a company spokesman.

© AFP

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126 Comments
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that's worrisome, what about 'sakura' safe or gone with the wind?

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

I wonder what "early" means? Noon? Or 6 p.m. LOL. And I wonder how many employers will comply.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

at least some common sense is being used here by issuing this advisory. it has been all over the news. it is time that people in this country become PRO-active instead of RE-active.

9 ( +12 / -4 )

it is time that people in this country become PRO-active instead of RE-active.

Well said!

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Just take the next 2 days off. Going to be some weird weather.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Am I the only one thinking this is a good time to wash clothes?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I expect the management taskforce in my office will have a series of meetings before making an announcement that staff should go home early just after the trains have stopped running.

That's what they did last year, and it took me ten hours to get home.

They may find my seat vacant by the time they emerge to make their proclamation.

3 ( +21 / -18 )

This is very un-Japanese....tsk.tsk.tsk....

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

While some may misunderstand this take it for what it's worth. While I wholeheartedly agree with sillygirl and being pro-active, I hope that no one gets hurt and everyone is safe,

I hope that the forecast is right on. The reason for that is from experience, in a typhoon, schools and businesses took the advice of the meteorological societies forecast and the typhoon that hit was no big deal and many businesses failed to heed their advice the next time and people got hurt.

The rule of thumb is that when a typhoon or strong wind warnings over land are issued school's and businesses close, mass transit stops within an hour or two of the actual winds 台風警告occurring.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ivan & Tamarama - Har!

Good thing the sakura have just started to bloom, they'd all get blown off this afternoon if they were in full bloom.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Some14some, I think Sakura should be ok( at least in Kanto) as they are still at only about 10-15% as of yesterday afternoon.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

apan Meteorological Agency does not seem to be aware of this.

Government agency. They may let you know later.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

JeffLeeAPR. 03, 2012 - 06:56AM JST I wonder what "early" means? Noon? Or 6 p.m. LOL. And I wonder how many employers will comply.

Think it's suppose to start getting bad around 3.

Since it's only an advisory, I guess it depends on the company.

My train doesn't run along the coast so hopefully there will not be any problems getting home.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Wow, I don't know what companies some of you work for, but every place I've worked at will usually cancel the whole day BEFORE work starts.

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

Where does JapanToday get this information? There is no warning on the Japan Meteorological site, at least, not on their English site. There is no mention of high wind.

Today 03 April CLEAR, RAIN LATER CLEAR, RAIN LATER

00-06 --% 06-12 20% 12-18 80% 18-24 60%

Daytime

High Tokyo 17°C Tomorrow 04 April CLEAR CLEAR

00-06 0% 06-12 0% 12-18 10% 18-24 10%

Morning

Low Daytime High Tokyo 9°C 15°C

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

gaijintraveller

Where does JapanToday get this information? There is no warning on the Japan Meteorological site, at least, not on their English site. There is no mention of high wind.

Try here on the JMA website. http://www.jma.go.jp/en/warn/319_table.html

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@gaijin traveller

Try here...

http://tenki.jp/warn/pref-16.html

or here...

http://www.jma.go.jp/en/warn/319.html

The biggest effect will be on transport in exposed areas. Trains will be stopped when the wind is above a certain strength (and slowed down before). If you wait until the full force of the wind hits Tokyo (or wherever you work) then it will be too late.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

We were not allowed to go home early last year during that huge typhoon which practically shut down most of the train lines in Kanto so looks like I'll be stuck at the office a while! Great.........If only I could parasail home :)

0 ( +1 / -1 )

14m/s winds are expected - nothing to get too worried about. Yet, for people who look fearfully to the sky when there's a few drops of rain, and look at you if you lost your mind walking without an umbrella, 14m/s are probably the equivalent of hell breaking loose.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Where does JapanToday get this information? There is no warning on the Japan Meteorological site, at least, not on their English site. There is no mention of high wind.

Just because it's not on the English JMA site doesn't mean JT is making things up- it's been all over the news, TV, online and print for the last 24 hours.

Wondering what kind of companies some of you work for that you have never been told to go home early because if a storm or typhoon? Usually a couple of times a year I have been let go early because of bad weather and my husband's company is the same.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

14m/s winds are expected - nothing to get too worried about.

The news I've seen reports 25 m/s winds with gusts up to 40.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Wind and rain does tend to do a number on sakura trees...going to go check the trees in Beilenson Park, Lake Balboa, CA tomorrow around lunchtime. I've been documenting the bloom, and a heavy rain did a major number on them the Saturday before I took pictures the last time. Link: http://www.flickr.com/photos/msgeek/sets/72157629091960508/ We got some serious wind yesterday, nothing like this though.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Wind and rain does tend to do a number on sakura trees

It does when they are more in bloom than most of the trees are in Tokyo right now- I was in Shinjuku Gyoen yesterday and most of the trees were less than 5% if that, so this storm shouldn't do too much damage.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

My toupee was already blown off this morning. I see it as an omen.

16 ( +15 / -0 )

Really? Home early? In Japan? I'm happy for those who get the few hours off if it is real.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Here's what will happen: companies and stores will be urged to send their employees home early, but no one will go because you simply don't do that in Japan. They will then be forced to stay at their offices, in hotels, or to walk home after trains are cancelled because they left too late. Everyone will grumble about it, but nothing will change.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

cactusJack - hats off to you!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

you simply don't do that in Japan

Plenty of companies do it. Do we really need this kind of silly generalisation?

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Smith - hear hear.

-12 ( +11 / -23 )

My toupee was already blown off this morning. I see it as an omen.

CJ, dont you mean yr crown LOL!!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This annoucement like so many things is mostly for show, to give a perceived notion of caring, the majority will get stuck at work if its a bad one.

My suggestion for those thinking they will be stuck if you havent already go out & grab an extra couple drinks & munchies in case you have to dig in so to speak!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

I thought the heavy wind we had last Saturday might be the sign that winter was finally over but I can't ever remember such a long and cold winter in Japan. Weather has a funny way about it.... Its kinda like Newton's law for every action there is an opposite and equal reaction. The long cold winter... in order to finally be blown north of us, needs extra powerful winds from the south this year.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

it is time that people in this country become PRO-active instead of RE-active.

Does holding an OUTDOOR BBQ party count? I just passed one with about 30 people in the garden of a local restaurant as I came home. The wind is starting to pick up here - thats going to be one hell of a party an hour or so from now!

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

I'm confident that my Japanese company will tell us to go home early, as they always do when there is severe weather.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I'm not hanging about until eight managers finish discussing the matter. I'm off!

0 ( +10 / -10 )

Time to go and get some beer and settle in for the evening. :P

0 ( +1 / -1 )

yeah,, i am home already since my Sensei told the students in our laboratory to go back home. Yihaaa...No 'benkyou' today! i will enjoy sleeping, and watching movie, i guess :)

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Winds?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

unbelievable amount of rain and wind in Kobe at this very moment

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I am looking forward to watching the news and seeing all of the people who think using umbrellas in typhoon like winds is a good idea. You would have thought they would learn by now

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Just about to start a company monthly meeting... The sheep are all afraid to say anything. I mentioned it and was looked at like I am being selfish... T.I.J.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Suffering in blatantly avoidable circumstance makes one...? Japanese? The sky maybe falling but best to go to work and ignore it until told otherwise. Hope no real disaster strikes, that would be regrettable!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Looking out my window at Hibiya-dori, it seems that umbrellas are out and still useful but getting gusty.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Don't go home early - how is Japan supposed to catch up to China and Korea you careless herbivores? 25m/s is nothing. I'd happily send my kids outside to play or fetch me a beer, if I had any.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

Don't stay unsafe, people...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

cactusjack - toupee off to you :)) I suggest going commando (on the upper level)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Pretty blustery in Western Japan right now. Black clouds and heavy, heavy sheeting rain around midday, then the winds started to pick up. Whistling and howling right now...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Cricky, good one!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I was in Hakone last night, traveling by bike. Watched the news on tv and wondered if it was crazy to travel back to Tokyo today by motorcycle but didn't have much choice. Left early and got back before the weather started. Now will sit safely in my house and enjoy it ; )

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Nothing in Tokyo thus far

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

I already saw my neighbors water bucket flying by , here at Ebisu!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I'm in Tokyo and it's pretty windy here...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@UncleBudah: nooooo not the water bucket! Somebody think of the children, save the water bucket!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@gogogo good one!! ha ha ha

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Here's what will happen: companies and stores will be urged to send their employees home early, but no one will go because you simply don't do that in Japan. They will then be forced to stay at their offices, in hotels, or to walk home after trains are cancelled because they left too late. Everyone will grumble about it, but nothing will change.

I disagree.....

They will then be forced to stay at their offices, in hotels, or to walk home after trains are cancelled because they left too late.

Who's going to force them? I never see people being held back or chained to their desk/till. Some DO out of loyalty, but that isn't forced - even if misplaced loyalty, thats more likely the scenario here. Those who live in risky areas (exposed railway lines etc) do tend to leave early, the relative "locals" are the ones to stay behind because they can, and some actually WANT to be stranded and put up at company's expense, because it is more fun than the option of going home.

Now, not EVERYONE falls into this scenario, but it isn't quite as vanilla as you paint I think. And the grumbling may happen, but only on the surface, in reality, no-one is really put out or even cares, it is just life in this climate. Why make a big deal of it?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

It's blowing it's guts out in Shikoku. I'm on a ferry going from Shikoku to Kyushu and its pretty rough at this moment. Before we left, i saw windgusts of +25m/s..

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Sorry! Is there a site that we can check to see which train lines have been shut down in Tokyo and Kanagawa? Not too good with the Kanji so an English site would be greatly appreciated. Cheers.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I am glad I got home safely.

-1 ( +12 / -13 )

Any information on trans/subway stoppages?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Windy in Tokyo now

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I considered going onto the balcony to secure a screen which has come a bit loose, but thought better of it. Dont want you guys laughing over another idiotic person doing something stupid in high winds and having a little unfortunate accident.

The wind is really starting up out there now.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Getting about time I checked the TV aerial on the roof of my 4 storey house.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I doubt companies will be sending people home early and based on the weather right now, I dont think it is necessary, but I dont know what the winds will be like later tonight.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Any information on trans/subway stoppages?

The jorudan website has all the current delays in Japanese, I'd hope people can at least recognize the name of their train lines and from that figure out the length of the delays.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Just went through here in Shiga...when the brunt of the storm went through, I for once was glad to have those rattling rain shutters on my house! I had at least an inch of hail in the front yard!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yes I agree Ivan. Very fishy things were going on when I gave you thumbs up too. I've noticed you and tmarie get a disproportionate number of thumbs down. It's just not possible to care that much about some of these comments. "I have been to Osaka" - 15 thumbs down! "I live in a house" - 20 thumbs down!

6 ( +10 / -5 )

Yeah, nice going home with all the office workers going home early. Trains packed. Never ceases to amaze me how Tokyoites (all Japanese?) stick to using umbrellas in all weather. Even today, a day cleary not made for umbrellas. Where I come from we know how to dress according to weather.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Urge people to comply? I have urges...no one complies?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

This is my first Typhoon ever. I'm quite disappointed. At home, we'd call this a strong wind at best, if we even felt it important enough to bring up in a conversation. I am starting to feel like the natural phenomena in Japan are more feared than there's need to. But again, what to expect from people who make a mad dash for a building when a single drop of rain hits them.

-14 ( +2 / -15 )

Oikawa... Mods are judging posts. One let the cat out of the bag 3 weeks ago. They are picking on those who don't meet their criteria thus the reduction of posters.

Moderator: No one let anything out of the bag. It's your imagination. A very poor contribution from you.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@tairitsuiken A Japanese person told me that wearing hooded (rain-) jackets is not acceptable in Japan, because it "looks strange". You are rather supposed to carry an umbrella whenever there's a chance of rain . Maybe throw on a face mask so you don't "look strange".

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

HansNFranz.

This is not even a Typhoon, mostly a strong wind and rain(same as I get back home). And an Umbrella won't do anything in a true typhoon besides break.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

coming down cats & dogs in Chuo-ku. Stair rods, even

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I doubt companies will be sending people home early

Just about everyone I know working in Tokyo has been sent home already or is leaving by 5 at the latest...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

JR east info here:

http://traininfo.jreast.co.jp/train_info/e/kanto.aspx

(the japanese version is more reliable and accurate)

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This is my first Typhoon ever.

This isn't a typhoon, it's a spring storm. Note they say "typhoon-strength" winds above- that's because it's not technically a typhoon, it doesn't have the spiral shape, didn't originate in the Pacific and and is too early in the year.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

ApsaraAPR. 03, 2012 - 05:08PM JST This isn't a typhoon, it's a spring storm. Note they say "typhoon-strength" winds above- that's because it's not technically a typhoon, it doesn't have the spiral shape, didn't originate in the Pacific and and is too early in the year.

I caught HanzNFranz's mistake as well. Although that didn't seem to stop him from using the weather to partake in a little Japan bashing.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

At home, we'd call this a strong wind at best

It hasn't peaked yet. It's being reported in some media as the strongest non-typhoon winds to hit Tokyo since 1959. Across the country, this one has already knocked over 11 trucks, broken windows, torn down some scaffolding, killed at least one person and injured lots of others. You must get some wild weather where you're from.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Not a typhoon but there`s a possibility of tornados.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Apsara and Maiko-san, please explain to me then, what is the difference between "Typhoon-strength" and "Typhoon", when the only interesting aspect is the strength of the wind? Is this wind as strong as in a Typhoon, or not? Maiko-san, it is not a mistake, because I was simply using the word Typhoon because that's what the media says it was.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

I tend to agree with HansNFranz, the article specifically says Typhoon strength winds. Now in English that means the winds are the same strength as a typhoon. That being said if these are typhoon strength winds well lets just say how precious are the people here. Its was at best gusty with some strong gusts. In my country we get winds like this and faster up to 120km/h and dont carry on like this stopping trains etc. Its wind and rain people use your brains and you will be fine. Oh and as for the Japanese running around like headless chooks whenever it rains OMG harden up people its not gonna hurt you.....

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

@Hansnfranz

Volume of water is different. I think we'll see 1/4 of a reasonable sized typhoon. The cloud system (as far as I can tell) isn't in a tropical storm pattern (no eye, etc). Your understanding of English is fine, as a typhoon IS a strong wind. If you think natural phenomenon are over feared here, then you might be misunderstanding the situation. People just want to get home, and trains stop for safety when wind is above 24m/s. I don't like sleeping in offices (hotels would be full) so makes sense to me to be observant and cautious (not fearful). HOWEVER it is a bit insensitive to say that to a nation that has endured a farely large slice of natural phonomenon in the last 13 months wouldn't you think?

5 ( +6 / -1 )

BTW, the roof sounds like it is coming off my house. Not overfearful, but that would be costly, so not exactly thrilled about the next few hours!!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

find your nearest pub!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The wind in Kobe is 25m/s now reduced to gusts. 25/s is getting on for 100 km/hr which I think that would be typhoon strenth and typhoons like hurricanes have different cats?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Ivan@3:54PM - "I am glad I got home safely"

Just don't bother showing up at work tomrrow, you slacker.

Ha ha! Just kidding, I'm glad you got home and hope everyone else gets home safely!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Just came back from the local super = another broken umbrella and soaked to the skin.

Stocked up on liquids and got Pizza ordered(Yeah, I am that nasty as we get a discount for rainy days). Got a friend visiting, he will stay over as I got a few spare futons. Wouldn't send my dog out there.

It is bad out there and when we got back around 15:00 there were already notices about train services stoppages.

Anyway be safe and stay warm and dry.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Wore my hoodie today because its looks strange using a broken umbrella blown by the wind.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@cletus I agree with you completely. @gyouza I have a hard time understanding you with the absence of pronouns etc., but I can make out that the whole "Typhoon" story for the winds we see today is nothing but sensationalist media reporting? I am really curious as I said I thought this is my first ever Typhoon and so far it is nothing more than a strong wind with occasional gusts. I would merrily take a nice walk outside with a good raincoat on and enjoy the nature. It's not like there's street signs or other huge objects being thrown around that could hit you on the head. And yes, you are right - the way Japanese people managed to stay calm during last years catastrophe, but are in absolute horror when they are caught by a few raindrops is puzzling - not only to me, as you can easily find out by Googling.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Ok, so Tozai line stopped. Crossing both Arakawa and Edogawa after all. @HansNFranz Yeah, you wouldn't want to appear "strange" here. Personally, I don't care - I use what is good for not getting wet. Umbrellas are frakkin useless tools when even the slightest bit of wind is involved.

I am not that impressed by these gusts coming at us. However, I do think it is a good idea letting affected people leave early as there probably WILL be train stops/delays.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Tozai line stopped that will affect Chuo, Sobu, etc lines.

As for letting staff go home early, way to late by atleast 5hrs.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

My lord!! This happens every day in the afternoon in the month of may in the Dominican Republic, with lightning and wind stronger than this!

Why is this a big news and everything have to stop in Japan?

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

@Hansnfranz Don't worry about not being able to understand, with practice you could get better. But for your comment...

I am really curious as I said I thought this is my first ever Typhoon and so far it is nothing more than a strong wind with occasional gusts.

Just to repeat, this isn't a typhoon. It is a different kind of weather pattern. The winds are gusting as strong as a typhoon would. People aren't afraid of the weather, they just dislike the inconvenience of not being able to get home. At the moment, 5 train lines are stopped, which means that the people living at the end of those lines are now stuck in the city. Yes people overreact to rain, but that is completely different. Also, there have been sheet metal roofs removed from their rafters and thrown into the streets, one man is injured already so not exactly sensationalist. Enjoy your walk, but take care!

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Just got home to find our pine tree blown down across the power lines and the garage has been trashed...

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Why is this a big news and everything have to stop in Japan?

Not wishing to sound rude, but does anything ever move in Dominican Republic, even on sunny days? Is it geared up to shift 30 million people en masse? Not exactly a fair comparison, and it is only big news because it affects so many people who just want to go home tonight. The press aren't making a big deal of it, and frankly it sucks when people often complain that they didn't have enough info!

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Its funny watching the news now.... this guy looks like he is holding on a telephone pole for his dear life. I am curious to see him in a real typhoon.

-7 ( +4 / -9 )

I can make out that the whole "Typhoon" story for the winds we see today is nothing but sensationalist media reporting?

Do you think that the families of those already killed and seriously injured by this storm think it's sensationalist? Ok, you haven't been badly affected by it, but it's strong enough to tip trucks and collapse structures, so while you might have winds like these daily where you are from, for Japan it's strong- can you accept that? Even if you can't, have a bit of compassion for the people affected- it's a bit smug to keep insisting that this is a light breeze. Also to repeat, it's not supposed to peak until 9pm, so we haven't seen the worst of it yet.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

lets just say how precious are the people here

People have died...

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It has been mental in Osaka. The winds are still dangerous outside.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Readers, there is nothing funny about this story.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Apsara

Do you think that the families of those already killed and seriously injured by this storm think it's sensationalist? Ok, you haven't been badly affected by it, but it's strong enough to tip trucks and collapse structures, so while you might have winds like these daily where you are from, for Japan it's strong- can you accept that?

Its interesting for a country that can build buildings and structures that resist earthquakes and a bit of wind can do this damage. Maybe they should also focus on making the building stronger to resist wind as well as earthquakes. Now wouldnt that make sense.

Even if you can't, have a bit of compassion for the people affected- it's a bit smug to keep insisting that this is a light breeze. Also to repeat, it's not supposed to peak until 9pm, so we haven't seen the worst of it yet.

No-one is saying its a light breeze but its certainly not the end of the world event like its being made out to be. Yes its windy but not dramatically so. Look at the pictures of the trucks, they tipped on a bridge. In many countries (l know in mine in particular) when its windy they ban trucks from windswept bridges, its a little thing called common sense. Where l am it was blowing at about 60km/h with higher gusts. For Japan that may be windy but come on people around here where carrying on like they where going to be blown away. I would hate to see them if it was really bad and look out if the rain gets em......

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@cletus Thanks for your insights into construction in Japan. Useful.

Just fyi, now 2 dead and 163 injured, and not peak. 38.9m/s winds recorded in Hachioji (about 140kmph).

Just so I know what you are referring to, where is the hype about the end of the world you refer to? I can't find it. All I can see is factual reporting about wind speeds, rainfall predictions, and advice to travel before the peak and when many (more) train lines stop.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Just went out on the balcony to see what the hell is going on. It's pretty bad out there and I am glad I don't have to go out (or am stuck ol a train platform for that matter). It seems wind is picking up and I think this is no joke.

Don't use your umbrellas, people...

0 ( +2 / -2 )

gyouza

Just fyi, now 2 dead and 163 injured,

Yes this is not good. But lets see from the article most injuries are from people being blown over.... Mmm saw one of them myself a Darwin award candidate riding a bike with an umbrella up and he came off. Doesnt take a rocket scientist to see it could have been avoided. One of the guys killed was crushed when is shed fell on him, l dont know about Japan but when l built my shed at home it had to have engineer certified wind ratings and building inspector sign off. We live in a terribly windy location and it has copped winds in excess of 120km/h and doesnt budge. I guess thats what a decent building and some regulations can do. How many little 50 - 60 kg people have you seen today struggling with big umbrella's how many injuries have these caused? Its called using your brains.

and not peak. 38.9m/s winds recorded in Hachioji (about 140kmph).

Yes l could pick one location and say its all that bad. Lets see the winds have only been 20 m/s in this location so is that indicative of everywhere? Nope. So your point is in that one location its very windy!!!

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

The usual armchair warriors are out in force on JT I see, calling weather so severe people have died and been injured, "a light breeze" and comparing it to the far superior storms in their own countries. How wonderful to be so strong and not afraid of anything.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

My hat was blown off my head around 4pm in Tokyo as I bicycling home in the rain and wind. A post office yubinkyoku dude on his little scooter happened to be passing by. He executed a rodeo-worthy passby and swooped up my hat for me. Gallantry is not dead in Japan.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

So are you all still enjoying the 'light breeze' there in Kanto?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Yes l could pick one location and say its all that bad. Lets see the winds have only been 20 m/s in this location so is that indicative of everywhere? Nope. So your point is in that one location its very windy!!!

Chiba = 33m/s (119kmph), Ishikawa = 33.7 (121kmph), central Tokyo 29.6 (106kmph). That's a fairly broad range of areas, right?

I think Orange sums it up perfectly!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

gyouza

I think Orange sums it up perfectly!

Maybe you and Orange can actually point out were anyone actually said it was a light breeze. If you can l will humbly beg your forgiveness....

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Yep! It hammering in Tokyo now. Glad my house has shutters on it. Also glad I have enough beer to sit out the storm. Can expect it to blow for another 12 hours or so too.

http://www.stormsurfing.com/cgi/display.cgi?a=npac_slp

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@cletus Even Hokkaido is having 25m/s gusts now, expected to get stronger. Injury toll is increasing, so the light treatment you are giving this does seem insensitive to what would appear genuine victims (there will always be idiots who bring things upon themselves). However, if you think Orange refers ONLY to you, then you might be flattering yourself! ;) You have my forgiveness anyway!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

gyouza

@cletus Even Hokkaido is having 25m/s gusts now, expected to get stronger. Injury toll is increasing, so the light treatment you are giving this does seem insensitive to what would appear genuine victims (there will always be idiots who bring things upon themselves).

Hey l genuinely do feel sad for anyone injured except those that bring it on themselves. As l said earlier if you care to read it.... But to many are hurt doing stupid things we see it with this, we see it when it snows. This is exactly the same, many just turn their brains off or are to busy on their phones to pay attention.

However, if you think Orange refers ONLY to you, then you might be flattering yourself! ;) You have my forgiveness anyway!

Oh believe me l dont think that at all, especially given Orange's definite lack of english skills given no-one here actually said what he claims. And you completely agree with him / her, and the false statement. Anyway nuff said on this l have made my point.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Readers, enough of this nonsense.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I think it's time to retract the claws and give us some useful information such as train delays.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Kyushu is calming down again and Saga is its usual peaceful self. Be careful outthere up north and stay safe!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

OK, I got home in time and am glad for the opportunity. But frankly, I feel it was not needed this time.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Yikes! I hope all of you guys and gals are doing okay over there!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Saw a kid soaked like a wet dog standing near the train station on my way home around 7:15. The wind and rain was so strong. I could guess that kid just finished his juku and he's waiting for his mom to pick him up. Poor boy.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

gyouza: "And the grumbling may happen, but only on the surface, in reality, no-one is really put out or even cares, it is just life in this climate. Why make a big deal of it?"

All I was saying is that the "you can go home if you wish" often results in everyone staying put until someone finally decides to leave. It doesn't really seem voluntary all the time. I'm sure in some places at least there is a stigma attached to leaving early.

Darren Brennan: "It has been mental in Osaka. The winds are still dangerous outside."

An just imagine that Osaka only had a mild warning, not a serious warning like in other places. I was sitting in my office in Osaka and watching the rain go near horizontal against the windows and could only imagine what it was like in Kanto where the trucks were blowing over.

And this happened on Saturday as well, though to a lesser extent.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Amazing how bridges structures are strong in Japan...2 trucks are leaning on it, and it didn't collapse. My home-country is Brazil, and if this kind of accidents happened in that country, I doubt the bridges would stand like that.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Kochikame you made a point - the bridge's rail takes a hefty weight, and still goes strong-that's good engineering...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Watched a guys umbrella capsize (not blown out from underneath, but actually crushed facing into the wind.) That was a first. Umbrellas are useless in winds of a quarter of that strength, and are actually dangerous when used in winds so strong. Was frigging nasty out there!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

That was some heavy rain and winds yesterday, luckily it had passed when i left the office.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@gyouza After the strong winds yesterday (I never said light breeze, by the way), I have to reinforce my viewpoint that the over-the-top sensationalist reporting is doing more harm than good. On the morning shows, I saw reporters running around screaming - yes, screaming - things like "the wind has become stronger", or "there is also rain now", or "let's check this building - yep, it has also been hit hard by the rain!", or "it's very hard to walk against the wind!". If I didn't understand Japanese, I'd probably think a moon-sized Asteroid was about to hit, only judging from the screaming and running of the news reporters. And this is a profession where neutrality and calmness are mandatory, at least where I come from. My point is - if you act like the world is going to end every time there is some bad weather, it can do harm to overall alertness should something actually catastrophic happen. Also, the news reports that one of the people who died yesterday was a 96 year old man climbed onto his roof in the middle of the storm.

-17 ( +2 / -19 )

I think using an umbrella in high winds should be considered an extreme sport. Now our forefathers, many times over, would have just stayed put in their cave until the storm blew over. Our insistence of keeping to clock schedules regardless of conditions does make modern humans look a bit insane.

Remember back during the tsunami in the Indian Ocean, a small privative tribe of two hundred people felt the ground shake and remembered their ancestors warning, get inland and on high ground. They did not lose a single member while civilized peoples, by the thousands, were swept away.

We have forgotten,make a mistake with nature and you can die. This may be even more important as our climate continues to rapidly change and waffle back and forth.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Out here in the Sea of Japan it's been a crazy. 7+ meter waves super strong gusts. I was actually fearful of a tornado touching down. Wish this storm would go away.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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