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Tokyo gov't passes strict anti-smoking laws

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By Natsuko Fukue

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So where are the "Strict" new rules that "outlaw" smoking. Everything mentioned already is and has been in place for a long time. Well, in the area area where I live anyway. And are there teachers and staff actually smoking inside primary schools?

-15 ( +7 / -22 )

Lighting up will be outlawed at restaurants in the capital, regardless of size. Restaurants can set up a separate indoor smoking space but customers cannot eat or drink inside the smoking area.

How is this considered outlawed?

-4 ( +7 / -11 )

It’s good to see a positive change, but I wonder if anything would have changed if it were not for the Olympics.

14 ( +18 / -4 )

Koike seems to be trying to become relevant again, after her party was wiped out in national Diet elections. Not going to work. Public wont fall for this.Only the Abe Cabinet can pass strong National Laws.

-45 ( +2 / -47 )

Women are very sensitive about passive smoking and they look at smokers as if smokers are criminals.

-45 ( +1 / -46 )

LDP can not do it, too many brown envelopes and too many old men so It's up to Local council to lead the way.

26 ( +28 / -2 )

Tokyo bylaw

Restaurants can set up a separate indoor smoking space but customers cannot eat or drink inside the smoking area.

Is smoke allowed to escape in the Tokyo bylaw though? Are the smoking spaces sealed off or something else?

(In the proposed nationwide law in large establishments it is not, according the article)

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Long time ago when I visited my American friend's house in Tokyo, they recommended me a Havana cigar after a meal for me. The Havana cigar was great. I do not forget the gorgeous night I spent with my friend. I was impressed at the same time about a civilized American tradition of treating guests. What has happened to Havana cigars after the anti-smoking movement in U.S.? Are they still smoking Havana cigars in U.S.?

-38 ( +5 / -43 )

Not going to work. Public wont fall for this.Only the Abe Cabinet can pass strong National Laws.

With regards to smoking here, seeing as how the national diet was only capable of passing a weak watered-down version of an anti-smoking law, due to special interest groups and money flowing into the government from JT the local government had to take things into their own hands and pass a law that means something.

If you know anything about Japan, you will know that prefectures can and do have the right to pass laws aand ordinances that are stricter than the national law, and THAT is what Koike did!

And BTW the "public" as you call them, is more than just Tokyo, but in this case it is Tokyo and don't underestimate the "public" as the overwhelming majority of smokers that I know, will follow the rules, and will do their best not to be a nuisance! It's the 1% that cause problems and I hope that THEY get hammered!

16 ( +20 / -4 )

This is good. And yes, doubt anything would have happened without the 2020 Olympics. The real test is not just compliance and enforcement but whether the people will have grasped the pleasure of no smoke after the Olympics are over.

20 ( +22 / -2 )

Anti-smoking movement is very strong in the western world. But can we abolish smoking totally from the world? Indonesia is at the top people are smoking at 67%. They have a unique cigarette "GARAM." It was nice but a little too sweet. I do not hear people in Indonesia suffer cancer more than other countries.

-18 ( +4 / -22 )

Only the Abe Cabinet can pass strong National Laws.

So why doesnt it Gambare ? - why didnt Shinzo introduce a strong national law instead of that watered down useless joke of one that exempts over half of restaurants and almost all bars, izakayas etc. ? Japan is a joke on a world stage when it comes to this issue ( dead last amongst developed nations ) . Hope the corrupt LDP oyajis with JT brown envelopes sticking out of their pockets will get shamed on this once international media converges on Tokyo for the Olympics. They sure deserve it for putting their shameless greed ahead of public health. Typical LDP .

16 ( +18 / -2 )

Whenever there's a thread about smoking, I enjoy reading your comments Schop!

I welcome this move but i hope the 'smoking room' is completely sealed off from the eating area - i would take my kids to somewhere like that.

Its good that koike-san is at the wheel on this issue - women care more about child health which is probably related to why women don't like secondhand smoke

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Was a fan of hers...then not a fan.

With this, she is back in the black in my book....just.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

So the LDP heckler from 22 June didn't win?

https://japantoday.com/category/politics/Pro-smoking-lawmaker-apologizes-for-heckling-cancer-patient

Way to go Tokyo. There are so many exceptions to not really be an anti-smoking law.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

We have a unique museum in Tokyo. Tobacco and Salt Museum.

https://www.jti.co.jp/Culture/museum_e/index.html

-11 ( +4 / -15 )

I don't take drugs. But I think if people want to smoke pot they can do in their own home. it's their choice. same with smoking. nicotine is a drug. In civilized countries like England Australia New Zealand bars and restaurants have a separate smoking room. this is fine. if somebody chooses to destroy their health it's their choice. But too force your drug addiction on other people is not okay.

Good luck fighting the old dinosaurs who have many shares in JT and belong to ldp...

14 ( +17 / -3 )

Anti democratic law winning another time. Still can't understand why non smokers go to eat and drink in smoking facilities while there are thousands non smoking. Never understand non smokers logic.

-16 ( +5 / -21 )

If less people can be persuaded to stop this addictive dirty habit the better......

6 ( +9 / -3 )

In Kansai the fine for smoking in a no-smoking area is 1000 yen. A packet of cigarettes is 500 yen. Many times I have complained to police about people smoking on the street. They dont do anything.

50000 should be the fine.

28000 passive smokers die a year here.

4 ( +11 / -7 )

Given what it costs the government to pay for smoking related illness I'm surprised more countries haven't limited smoking. Smoking in public is a problem for non smokers. Train stations, etc - no smoking. Separate rooms like England are fine. Complete bans like NY are over the top.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Ms. Koike, THANK YOU !!!

Lucky Tokyo... hopefully this spreads beyond !

5 ( +8 / -3 )

@dew gun

Not attacking you mate, but don't you think smoking where you eat is a disgusting thing to do? I know many smokers who think so.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

JT is raising prices of cigarettes one pack by 50 yen soon. Many are saying they will stop smoking. I stopped smoking a while ago but could not resist and began smoking again but I have to determine to quit seriously. If not I go broke. One pack of cigarettes 520 yen is too much.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

theFuToday  08:26 am JST

“So the LDP heckler from 22 June didn't win?”

That was in the National Diet, this new law is just for Tokyo. And welcome indeed it is. I’m fine with the idea of a properly sealed smoking room without being able to eat or drink in it as that goes further to protect the serving staff. Some of our local Doutor coffee shops have excellently designed smoking sections, and being self-serve shops the customers carry in their own food and drink and take out their own trays etc to the return shelf. But staff still have to enter frequently to wipe the tables, carry in food for some disabled or very elderly customers etc.

Ganbare, “Koike seems to be trying to become relevant again”

Hasn't this always been one of the things on her platform as head of Tokyo? I seem to remember her talking about it when she first ran

6 ( +8 / -2 )

At least the upcoming Olympics is causing some positive changes that will last beyond that 2 weeks.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

In Kansai the fine for smoking in a no-smoking area is 1000 yen. A packet of cigarettes is 500 yen. Many times I have complained to police about people smoking on the street. They dont do anything.

Oh this, I saw a guy smoking in a non-smoking area in front of 2 police officers one time, and they didn't say anything. Shows you how much they enforce the law. 1000 yen is indeed way too cheap.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Schopenhauer - Be careful, your first comment:

'Women are very sensitive about passive smoking and they look at smokers as if smokers are criminals'

Makes you sound very old indeed.

14 ( +16 / -2 )

Fair enough, as a smoker who's enjoyed the drug for decades, it's probably time to knock it on the head. This move will help me do just that.

I've seen the smoking ban introduced in several countries and people adjusted pretty fast.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

That title - " Tokyo gov't passes strict anti-smoking laws" should read " Tokyo gov't passes strict*er*** anti-smoking laws *t**han the lame national govts*".**

The ordinance is to be welcomed, as the weak LDP laws failed to meet the standards set by the IOC as necessary for an Olympic City. All Olympics in recent decades have been smoke - free. A huge embarrassment was looming until Koike stepped in. The cynic in me believes this was probably the plan all along. Abe kept his Japan Tobacco buddies happy with his effort(I tried hard lol), knowing full well Koike will establish strict local rules gaining a smiley fromm the olympic bods.

And Schopenheur - yes that museum is quite unique. Museums are good at showing how people lived in the past and how different modern life is in comparison. And that particular museum - set up by none other than Japan Tobacco - mysteriously combines tobacco with salt to add credibility to its reason to be. I mean Salt has been an integral part of Human existance for millenia and it's presence was one of the reasons which enabled civilizations to develop. It's preservative and health benefits can be found in all cultures across the world. Tobacco on the other hand is a jonny-come-lately drug of addiction spread by commercial enterprises with making money on their minds. Chalk & Cheese - never underestimate the cunning power of corporate foxes.

And as has been stated many times, once smoking has been banned in public institutions. buildings etc, the sun will continue to rise and people will adapt to the situation. It has happened in far heavier smoking environments than Japan and in a relatively short time becomes the new norm, making most people happier.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The JT stock had a nice fall after the news and it'll probably continue to fall throughout the week. Good news for us non-smokers though, I don't mind the newer iQos or whatever since it doesn't seem to produce a cigarette smell. Nothing more irritating than having to go somewhere as a group and then end up with all your clothes stinking like an ashtray.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Can anybody clarify how Japan defines a restaurant and bar? I know most places in states with smoking bans defines restaurants in terms like 'Businesses whose revenue is made of X amount of food and drink items are restaurants, while those businesses whose revenue is made up of X amount of alcohol sales are Bars.'

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Ingenious! Here is the plan. "Restaurants can set up an indoor smoking space but customers cannot eat or drink inside the smoking area." So all they have to do is make two areas without any separation. They can call one are the "smoking place" and the other space "the room" and not even block it off. Everyone is free to smoke in The Room, but allow smoking only with no food at the two tables in the "smoking place."

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Maybe yakuza people also will stop smoking in care of their health.

-10 ( +0 / -10 )

In other words, law with no teeth. Again.

The whole article and what Koike is supposed to have said is contradictory, hypocritical, meandering and deceptive. But(t)s everywhere.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Ironically, smoking in the street is already banned in many places in Japan

As someone who hates breathing in tobacco smoke, I find this to be the most absurd law. Smoke can dissipate outside very quickly. The problem is when you're in confined spaces like restaurants. It's like a car crashing into a restaurant and the driver then leaves the engine idling.

But then again, priorities and common sense was never part of the LDP. Just pure greed and selfishness.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Browny1, “mysteriously combines tobacco with salt to add credibility to its reason to be”

Not so mysterious. I remember when the museum opened in 1978. At that time attitudes towards smoking were radically different and both salt and tobacco were monopolies run by the government.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Bravo!!

But strict regulations should be established for smoking rooms in eating establishments, if they are not going to be banned outright.

I suggest the following:

Full airlocks. (I don't want a whiff of smoke every time the door opens)

Frosted glass or fully opaque walls (I no more want to watch a smoker puffing away while I'm eating with my family than I want to watch an intravenous drug user slapping away to find a vein)

And double the price of all cigarettes – they are still way to cheap here.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Are they still smoking Havana cigars in U.S.?

Actually, Havana cigars have been prohibited in the US since the Cuban revolution, due to a reactionary and stupid embargo. It was finally lifted briefly during Obama's 2nd term. But, was reinstated by Il Douche, whose main policy-making impetis is simply to undo anything done by Obama, no matter how popular or helpful to the population.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Increase the price to ¥1000/packet. Ban it from all restaurants unless there is a separate ventilated smokers room. Fag ends survive and now end up in the oceans with fish thinking its food.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Fantastic news. This will probably have an indirect but significant effect outside of Tokyo, given its sheer size and importance.

Probably the most important will be putting the lie to the industry argument that this will hurt the restaurant business. Once other cities see Tokyo succeed with this, expect similar rules being enacted elsewhere.

Anti democratic law winning another time.

She is a democratically elected leader whose party won the last election and passed a law that has broad support among the public. How is this in any way anti democratic?

Still can't understand why non smokers go to eat and drink in smoking facilities while there are thousands non smoking. Never understand non smokers logic.

Let me explain the logic to you. I've got 5 restaurants in my neighborhood that serve food I like. All of them allow smoking. If I want to eat out, I have no choice but to eat in a smoking restaurant. Just because non smoking restaurants exist does not mean they are readily accessible to most people in their daily lives.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Papaguilio and Goodlucktoyou:

In Kansai the fine for smoking in a no-smoking area is 1000 yen. A packet of cigarettes is 500 yen. Many times I have complained to police about people smoking on the street. They dont do anything.

Oh this, I saw a guy smoking in a non-smoking area in front of 2 police officers one time, and they didn't say anything. Shows you how much they enforce the law. 1000 yen is indeed way too cheap.

FYI: It is not the job of the police to enforce city or ward bylaws. That is why wards and cities that create no-smoking bylaws have separate "anti-smoking patrols" and "bicycle parking patrols" that hand out fines. If you are bothering the police force about smoking or signs or bicycles on the sidewalk, you are wasting their time and your own.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Koike seems to be trying to become relevant again, after her party was wiped out in national Diet elections. Not going to work. Public wont fall for this.Only the Abe Cabinet can pass strong National Laws.

Gambare Japan - or it could just be possible that she is doing her job as Tokyo Governer, which involves protecting people from unnecessary health risks (secondary smoke) and representing the wishes of the residents (80% of Japanese people don't smoke). Not everything revolves around Abe, you know!

2 ( +5 / -3 )

You go girl!

Got my vote!

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Pukey2Today  09:49 am JST

"Ironically, smoking in the street is already banned in many places in Japan"

As someone who hates breathing in tobacco smoke, I find this to be the most absurd law. 

Actually, given how crowded the sidewalks can be at times, this is a very good law. I remember a handful of occasions of arriving at work or home to discover a burn in my clothing from a commuting smoker, back in the bad old days.

I am very happy to see that this law will prevent smoking indoors as well. I do wonder though, does the word "restaurant" above include izakayas?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

garypen

Thank you for your information. The Havana cigar I smoked at my friend was I remember my friend said imported to U.S. via a third country. Havana cigar is expensive. It was a luxury moment of life. I think the situation is the same with pipe tobaccos which are imported from the Netherlands.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

"Koike seems to be trying to become relevant again, after her party was wiped out in national Diet elections. Not going to work. Public wont fall for this.Only the Abe Cabinet can pass strong National Laws."

"Women are very sensitive about passive smoking and they look at smokers as if smokers are criminals."

What universe have I just woken up in? Darn it! Is this the one where Brexit AND Trump happened. Hopefully tomorrow I will wake back up in the normal timeline.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

Cuban cigars have always been available but best price from the airports. Enjoy a Cuban cigar once or twice a year with my best single malt but I smoke it outside.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

This doesn't change anything and no fines will be handed out regardless of the law. How many signs do you see in public where smoking isn't permitted yet ignored by many smokers. I have never seen any smoker challenged when smoking in an area of the sidewalk that they're not supposed to, even though some cites employ some semi-retired officials that hang about in their hi viz vests aimlessly doing nothing and ignoring the issue.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

bloody idiotism, stop getting under people skin already.

I dont care about smoking at schools and such but restaurants should make the choice themselves.

display big sign too is not a problem.

I want a smoke with my drink and willing to pay extra for it too.

-9 ( +4 / -13 )

Alex Einz - making people around you breathe your carcinogenic smoke is the height of selfishness. Rainyday's desire to eat in a smoke-free environment is entirely reasonable.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

browny1

JT was once Japan Monopoly Corporation - government business. They sold tobacco and salt.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Better than nothing I guess. Japan really needs to get with the times when it comes to smoking.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

She has responsibility.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Koike seems to be trying to become relevant again, after her party was wiped out in national Diet elections.

Yes, and its such a breath of fresh air ( pun intended ) to see her making decisions that ARE relevant as opposed to your LDP oyajis living in their bubbles , displaying their irelevance to the average Taro daily.

Long time ago when I visited my American friend's house in Tokyo, they recommended me a Havana cigar after a meal for me. The Havana cigar was great. I do not forget the gorgeous night I spent with my friend. I was impressed at the same time about a civilized American tradition of treating guests.

In my young days I also enjoyed an occasional cigar and a glass of red wine at home with my friends ...chilling out in style it was for us back then  :)  And thats the point...smokers can indulge their habbit in the privacy of their home but should not be allowed to in establishments shared with others who dont want to be exposed to the second hand smoke. Personally kicked the habit many years ago and never looked back...i absolutely despise being in a restaurant especially when there are children around and some twit decides to smoke  pretending not to see / comprehend the effect it has on others exposed to the smoke. I usually get up and politely ask them if they could not smoke in front of the kids and take it outside.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Smokers... always banging on about their "rights"

Nobody is stopping you from smoking. They are only "restricting" where you can do it.

As smokers are the ones who are having an effect on what we all desire...clean breathable air...Then it is they who should adjust to these new laws that are (very slowly) being introduced.

If someone wants to create a place you can all go and breath in each others filthy air then, be my guest...I won't be spending any money there.

Smoking where you eat...going home stinking...shortening your life (arguably sure)...yeah, real smart.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

How on earth is this “strict”? Only in Japan would they back-pat themselves about something that is anything but strict and that they won’t enforce at all anyway. TIJ

6 ( +10 / -4 )

"We should not impose our opinion on others."

--Abe, PM of Japan, 6/27/2018

1 ( +6 / -5 )

GOOD! Do not count her out yet.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

at least something happened, hope gradually enforce more limitation.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

cuckasshopboy

nope, if he wants, he should go to non smoking restaurant. instead of forcing other to adjust to his whims.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

Im not sure the ratio.of fish to ciggerete butts on my beach, popular for fisherman, but i think fish are losing.

My belief is that smokers and fast food eaters just throw their waste in the nearest bush.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

nope, if he wants, he should go to non smoking restaurant. instead of forcing other to adjust to his whims.

This makes no logical sense. Non-smokers are the ones currently being forced to adjust to the whims of smokers and suck up your filthy smoke if we want to eat out, not the other way around.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Also, at my hospital, 40percent of patients with smoking related disease walk 25m and light up between tests and treatment.

Old generation is so stuborn.

Btw. I am amember of ASH, and been asaulted about 7 times for telling smokers to stop in japan.

But, if you have children, dont be scared to get pushed, it is your childs health.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Smokers often don’t even allow their cigarettes to burn in their own cars - they hang them out the window. Why is that? Don’t they like the cigarette smell stinking up their cars? The least (really, the very least) smokers can do is allow non-smokers the same privilege they afford their cars - no stinking smoke while we eat.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

should really find a different place to go to instead of forcing others to adjust to you. exactly smokers being a minority, their habit should never infringe on the health and rights of the majority non-smokers, Japan is a democratic elected country who should represent the needs of the majority. Smokers in Japan can still smoke but only in their own personal spaces not shared public spaces, if your a smoker and dont like the new laws then move to a country where smokers are in the majority.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Controlling smokers where they can smoke can easily be done with enforcement. The whole point of anti-smoking laws is to protect the health of the majority of the population from the passive smoke which non smokers cannot control when smokers are around them.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Smoker are a dying breed

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Ironically, smoking in the street is already banned in many places in Japan, under local regulations that impose hefty fines on violators. 

Really? I have never seen anyone ever cited for smoking on the street, and, as far as I know, no one has been fined. After 10 years of the law being in effect in Kansai, not a single person has ever been fined for smoking on the street or sidewalk.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"Kiss a non smoker,taste the difference." Should adopt that 80s Aussie ad.Or put a pic of plucked up lungs on the ciggie boxes.That would get people's attention.Would have more impact than this toothless attempt as I tried explaining before...

2 ( +5 / -3 )

A smoking room will never work. Second hand smoke kills. Just the slightest whiff of smoke at an eating establishment is going to make foreigners shame Japan on how far behind the times they are. After all, most large international cities have already banned that filthy little dirty habit.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Japan's government earns billions of dollars annually in cigarette tax revenue, and owns a one-third stake in Japan Tobacco, the world's third largest tobacco company.

The health ministry had proposed a strict anti-smoking bill, aiming to stub out smoking at most indoor establishments. But the plan encountered staunch opposition from members of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's own Liberal Democratic Party, many of whom openly back the tobacco industry and smokers over health advocates.

There seems to be a conflict of interests...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Smoker are a dying breed

Apparently so, but at least I was allowed indulge in my vices for a time.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Another subject in which I'm in the minority in this comment section.

I HATE smoking.

I actually hate all types of drugs. I HATE alcohol, and HATE how people see it as something that is "normal" for people to do, and see as "abnormal" when people do not do it.

That said, I also believe in personal responsibility, and in personal freedoms.

I'm happy to not have to smell a smoker, but I'm not happy that establishments cannot set their own rules on this matter.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

As a lifelong non-smoker i guess i should welcome these news. Just hope we won't get the 'family restaurant' crowd with their screaming/unruly kids, sense of entitlement etc in our -until now- nice & quiet, family-owned Izakayas. That's my only concern.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

smokers are not a minority,

20% = minority

whats next you gonna ban people because of their color or eating habits? oh wait you already did before....

Who is getting banned? Smokers are still welcome to go anywhere they want whenever they want. They are just not allowed to engage in their particular hobby while in certain places. This is not oppressive nor does it warrant the hysteria you are displaying. I don't hear motorcycle enthusiasts complaining that they aren't allowed to ride their bikes in restaurants.

this PC culture is fascism in diguise... glad some smokers told you off, I would too.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

SchopenhauerToday 10:43 am JST

browny1

JT was once Japan Monopoly Corporation - government business. They sold tobacco and salt.

Thanks for that. Didn't know.

I hope the museum differentiates clearly between the history of salt and the history of tobacco. Wouldn't want to confuse the public re the greater worth of one to world civilization compared to the other.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Luis David Yanez - I don't think that getting people to step outside for a fag is a huge infringement on their personal freedom. Smokers in other countries have taken it in their stride.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

What the heck is this. These mentioned rules already exists from long time. Those mentioned places has been smoking prohibited from long time. I am a smoker and Tokyo resident and I know how difficult it is to find a coffee shop with smoking designated room.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

It is just my feeling, but I hate to smell other people smoking when I am eating! Also, I used to be a smoker and I never smoked inside or made other have to smell it. Finally I just said I am done through them away and I feel so much better!!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

 I know how difficult it is to find a coffee shop with smoking designated room.

farhaan - really? I also live in Tokyo and do a lot of work in cafes. Every single Doutor I've been to has a designated room for smokers. To their credit, the chain does a good job of keeping the smoke inside the smoking room.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

The government should keep their hands off of my body.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Cucshop

Yes stepping outside is the norm in other countries and not tooo onerous.  But what inevitably happends is that gets taken further and it is outside but not close to entrance or awning, or outside but not on public property or - as we now hear in UK - not even in your own car or even own balcony cos neighbopurs complain.

Anti smokers never satisfied until smoking - and next vaping - are banned completely.,

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Why is this such a big issue? The solutions are so simple.

Raise all smokes to 5000 yen a pack. Smokers are gonna smoke no matter what, might as well profit off of them. That way the companies and government get their payments as well.

Every restaurant , by law MUST create a "smokers" room. A smokers room consists of no trash cans, no windows and no chairs. There are just 4 walls, with slabs of concrete they can put their food on. Working staff are not allowed to enter said room at any time. Customers must carry their own food in and out of the room by themselves.

Cops should actually, DO WORK and start fining these people for smoking in public areas such as hospitals, schools, bus terminals, train stations, airports, etc. Maybe they could even make an arrest or two to set examples.

As a result, slowly but surely this smoking problem will go away forever.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Luis David Yanez - I don't think that getting people to step outside for a fag is a huge infringement on their personal freedom. Smokers in other countries have taken it in their stride.

Yep. The UK is one example. I know some go out for a smoke from the pub when they see a nice looking man/woman go out for one.

Not a smoker myself and not anti-smoking either. On balance, I prefer smokers.

Just do it outside.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

These laws only apply to Tokyo, not Japan.

85% of the foreigners living in Tokyo are other Asians and not the American and European. Chinese 38%. South Korea 18%

http://nbakki.hatenablog.com/entry/Foreign_Population_by_Nationality_in_Tokyo_as_of_2017

The people on this post complaining about the new regulations are a tiny minority of foreigners.

I guess these days non Asian foreigners are a majority who do not even smoke. The smokers are a minority of the minority.

In 2015, the adult smoking rate was 19.3%, There are no figures for the number of foreign smokers.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Wakarimasen - then you have my sympathies. All I want is smoke-free air in all public indoor spaces. Apart from that, I have no argument with smokers.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

ONLY, 440 yen per packet!!! wow thats so cheap, in the UK a pack of 20 fags is around 1500 yen (£10) and you can't buy a pack of 10 any more, you can only buy a pack of 20. there is pretty much a blanket ban of smoking inside building etc, one of these "work places" is a company car and van, will this apply to Japan as well? ive driven a works van that had a heavy smoker previously driving it and it stank! i refused to drive it and the company gave me another one.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

In Kobe its very easy to find no smoking restaurants. The underground shopping malls or department stores are all no smoking. The ones we like are free of smokers. Smoking on the street is not allowed although some people still do it. Smoking places only which are awful to walk past. The small bars and restaurants are still very much smoking places so we just avoid them. The hotel restaurants are usually no smoking these days.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

So does that mean I can go to an izakaya in Tokyo with friends and not come out smelling like an ashtray and needing to fumigate my clothes? This is fantastic news!

3 ( +7 / -4 )

I don't think that getting people to step outside for a fag is a huge infringement on their personal freedom. Smokers in other countries have taken it in their stride.

I was actually talking about the right of establishments. If an establishment wants to be smoker friendly, I don't understand why they should be forced not to be.

For example, I personally would love if there were EVER no drunks who smell horrible, vomit inside the establishment, and act horrible inside a restaurant, and I tend to go to places with a low rate of those kind of people, but not because of my preferences, it means it is OK for me to force establishments to enforce my personal views on the matter.

Also, it really doesn't matter if most countries were to jail for life smokers, not because "everyone else is doing it" makes it right.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

Window dressing - what restaurant owner will call the cops on his own customers, which cops will levy fines instead of warnings, and which cops will know who is a repeat offender? Like so many other "laws" in Japan, this is designed to be unenforcable and maintian the status quo while whitewashing the fact that nothing has changed.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

the nanny state encroaches yet more. All you celebrating it might want to pause to think, what will they take away next?

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

Expat - Other customers might complain right?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Rolf AndersonToday  02:03 pm JST

The government should keep their hands off of my body.

Then you won't mind not getting government assistance when you're sick for whatever reason then?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Like so many other "laws" in Japan, this is designed to be unenforcable and maintian the status quo while whitewashing the fact that nothing has changed.

On the contrary a law like this is extremely easy to enforce because it is enforced against the business owner rather than the smokers directly. The sidewalk ban is way harder to enforce because it requires catching smokers breaking it red handed, which is highly costly to police and relatively low return since the fines are so small (hence almost nobody ever being fined, its simply not worth the effort to crack down). Enforcing this one on the other hand is simply a matter of inspectors going to the business (which they already do for health and other reasons) and if the someone is smoking the owner gets busted - they can't run away like the smoker on the sidewalk.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

the nanny state encroaches yet more. All you celebrating it might want to pause to think, what will they take away next?

I think 'swearing' in public will be next. I can't tell you how many footy games I have attended where dads asked other supporters to 'mind their language cause there were kids around'. Dad brings little Jimmy to the footy, wants to be among 'real' supporters cause it's cheaper & the whole terrace should just shut up and not call the ref a tosser/W nor talk about their last tinder date.

We are heading towards a bland, sanitised (imo over sanitised) society where epicureans, larrikins etc aren't welcome.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Luis David YanezToday  03:52 pm JST

I was actually talking about the right of establishments. If an establishment wants to be smoker friendly, I don't understand why they should be forced not to be.

I just got more information at Japan Times:

The ban restaurant / bar ban will impact all establishments that hire staff. Small places run by only the the owner (and or a family member) can chose whether to be smoking or non-smoking.

This allows the establishment owner to chose to endanger themself, by inviting in smokers, but not staff.

Also:

The new rules come into effect April 2020.

Places that opt to have a smoking room must make that a separate room that doesn't leak into the non-smoking area.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

The risk for lungcancer is 1 500 percent and even passive smoking do represent a higher level for lungcancer.

We can make a comparance. The risk for lungcancer is 1 percent as effect of exposure to the radioactive radiation from Fukushima.

Of cource there is an increased risk but put that in relation to smoking which have a much more healthy risk.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The ban restaurant / bar ban will impact all establishments that hire staff. Small places run by only the the owner (and or a family member) can chose whether to be smoking or non-smoking.

This is kind of a hypocritical double standard. Basically what is saying is, if you want to be a smoker friendly establishment, you cannot hire anyone, which basically means that your business cannot grow.

Places that opt to have a smoking room must make that a separate room that doesn't leak into the non-smoking area.

Yeah, but "customers cannot eat or drink inside the smoking area", which just seems like a "punishment" for smokers, just like the Tabaco taxes.

What also makes no sense at all, is that most of these rules also apply to Electronic Cigarettes, even thou they are a completely different beast, and these rules force those who wish to vape to share a room with the smoke of regular cigarettes, in many instances defeating the whole point of Electronic Cigarettes.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

We've had smoking bans in Scotland for years and if people feel the need to light up they can go outside... that is any public place or place of work, and recently includes cars with kids in them.

I'm all for smoking bans - disgusting habit anyway.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Ireland has the strictest no smoking ban.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

amazing all the celebrants to this diminishment of rights. "Their freedom was taken to their thunderous applause."

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

There is a better way for this: technology. Law is subjective, govt is abusive.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Whatever China is doing, she is supported by Chinese people

Well that’s the official propaganda that the CCP lies to their people with. No one actually knows what the Chinese people really think, because China is not a democracy. The government just likes to tell the world what they have told the Chinese people they should think.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Cucashopboy

I also live in Tokyo and do a lot of work in cafes. Every single Doutor I've been to has a designated room for smokers.

I know but not all street corners have Doutor. I always search for Doutor on google maps wherever I go and somtimes have to walk hundreds of meters bypassing several coffee shops to reach.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

and the LDP dominated japan (same party in govt for going on a century) is a democracy eh?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

There's a Mos Burger near the hotel I normally use and they have a small room set aside for smokers

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Soon I'll lite a stogie again at Tokyo's hidden treasures :)

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

I thought Japan is a lot better comparing to other places I had been. Probably most people are more considerate than the others. Like when I was in HK, I pretty much believe I need an oxygen tank just to walk around in a crowded street. Even in Canada, I had to practice holding my breath around buildings' entrances.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

The government should keep their hands off of my body. and smokers should keep their smoke out of non - smokers lungs. No non-smokers shouldn't have to leave an establishment or go elsewhere because a smoker wants to smoke inside, the minority has to appease the majority in any democratically elected country , the rights of a minority dont trump the rights of the majority.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Americans do not have any right to oppose smoking. You are living in a dangerous country where guns are allowed to own by individuals. Guns are more dangerous than cigarettes.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

The underlying fact is that times are changing, and some people here don't like that -

I'm sorry if you don't like it but when we realize that doing this will save lives (at the cost of asking smokers to move to another room), it has to be done ..

1 ( +3 / -2 )

cliffy:

Like when I was in HK, I pretty much believe I need an oxygen tank just to walk around in a crowded street.

I don't know which HK you've been to, but the place is miles ahead compared to Japan. For starters, no smoking in restaurants means just that.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Ireland has the strictest no smoking ban.

Brought in, back in 2004, iirc. People handled it just fine. Although, it must be said, businesses especially in rural areas did suffer as the older generation were less happy to give up the smoke in the bar.

Plenty of places, esp in the cities, adopted covered areas where smokers can go.

It's always odd in the States where some bars still let you smoke indoors in certain areas. And some Irish bars will let you blaze up there, even if the official law says you can't!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Back on topic please.

I'd love to be able to stop my Neighbors smoking the foulest smelling of whatever they smoke.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

 thought Japan is a lot better comparing to other places I had been. Probably most people are more considerate than the others. Like when I was in HK, I pretty much believe I need an oxygen tank just to walk around in a crowded street. Even in Canada, I had to practice holding my breath around buildings' entrances.

It definitely is despite the possibility to smoke in certain bars. Non-smokers don't have to go to such bars as customers and staff are in consent about smoking.

Especially Americans tend to make an issue about overseas practices which is just another example of their deep rooted hypocorism as they rule the global tobacco industry and receiving the benefits of that fact.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

hypocrisy **

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

How can a country profit from tobacco which caused disease that costs more than the profits in taxes? The absurdity is hard to wrap my head around.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

How can a country profit from tobacco which caused disease that costs more than the profits in taxes? The absurdity is hard to wrap my head around.

Enlighten yourself with facts and figures :)

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

the nanny state encroaches yet more. All you celebrating it might want to pause to think, what will they take away next?

In this case the government is taking away getting cancer from non-smokers. You think cancer should have more victims perhaps? Because weak addicted losers who cannot stop smoking feel it is their right to kill others along with themselves?

Smokers are such hypocrites along with being a public safety threat.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I just cannot get how many of the same people who are so anti-tabbaco and pro-marihuana do not see the logical dissonance of their position.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I just cannot get how many of the same people who are so anti-tabbaco and pro-marihuana do not see the logical dissonance of their position.

One is poison, one is medicine. Hardly comparable.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

One is poison, one is medicine. Hardly comparable.

Many opioids are also a medicine... That doesn't make them legal for recreational use.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I just cannot get how many of the same people who are so anti-tabbaco and pro-marihuana do not see the logical dissonance of their position.

Marihuana is illegal in Japan. Tobacco is not. Please note the name of this website.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I just cannot get how many of the same people who are so anti-tabbaco and pro-marihuana do not see the logical dissonance of their position.

I wonder which 'same people' you are talking about? I see no-one on this thread expressing pro-marihuana views.

I cannot get how people who think up strawman arguments to 'prove' some point or other do not see the logical dissonance of their position.

After watching both my parents and a brother kill themselves with cigarettes, the sooner the vile weed becomes illegal, the better in my book. Banning it from restaurants - all public places - is a start.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

One is poison, one is medicine. Hardly comparable.

This.

The benefits of the medicine are there for all to see, if they bothered to do a bit of un-biased research.

As a smoker, even I can see the former is a poison.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I cannot get how people who think up strawman arguments to 'prove' some point or other do not see the logical dissonance of their position.

It's hardly a strawman. Prominent Pro Marijuana people are also Anti Tabaco. (Eg. Bernie Sanders)

And the inverse is also true. Many prominent Pro Tabaco people are Anti Marijuana.

In fact, the reaction I got, which is that Marijuana is good and Tabaco is bad is something regular I get when I point out that if the fact that they are Anti Tabaco also mean that they are Anti Marijuana.

After watching both my parents and a brother kill themselves with cigarettes, the sooner the vile weed becomes illegal, the better in my book. Banning it from restaurants - all public places - is a start.

Making something illegal doesn't mean people are going to stop doing it. It just mean that you are going to make criminals out of common folks.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The benefits of the medicine are there for all to see, if they bothered to do a bit of un-biased research.

> As a smoker, even I can see the former is a poison.

Anything can be a medicine or a poison depending on use.

Even water can be a poison.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Prominent Pro Marijuana people are also Anti Tabaco. (Eg. Bernie Sanders)

I didn't realise Bernie Sanders was posting on JT, or was in any way interested in/knowledgable about Japanese smoking laws.

And the inverse is also true. Many prominent Pro Tabaco people are Anti Marijuana.

And the opposite is also true. Many people who think smokers are stupid and need to be regulated think the same about potheads.

Making something illegal doesn't mean people are going to stop doing it.

It likely means a lot of people aren't going to start doing it in the first place. And if the sale of cigarettes is made illegal, far fewer people are going start/continue smoking than if they can pick up a pack at any supermarket.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Many opioids are also a medicine... That doesn't make them legal for recreational use.

Ok, I'm going to ignore that you were trying to equate tobacco and marijuana as the same thing, then somehow jumped to opioids, and respond to your comment:

They should be.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I didn't realise Bernie Sanders was posting on JT, or was in any way interested in/knowledgable about Japanese smoking laws.

... What?

And the opposite is also true. Many people who think smokers are stupid and need to be regulated think the same about potheads.

Yes, and there are also people who believe that neither one should be regulated. Sadly most people fell in either of the 2 categories I mentioned earlier.

It likely means a lot of people aren't going to start doing it in the first place. And if the sale of cigarettes is made illegal, far fewer people are going start/continue smoking than if they can pick up a pack at any supermarket.

And those who do will be treated like criminals, have their lives destroyed, and probably will create a new black market for Tabaco.

Sounds like an excellent solution.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Ok, I'm going to ignore that you were trying to equate tobacco and marijuana as the same thing, then somehow jumped to opioids, and respond to your comment:

> They should be.

What is they and they should be what?

Opioids should be legal for recreational use?... ok, if you believe that, even thou opioids do way more harm than Tabaco, why are you against Tabaco again?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Readers, opiods are not relevant to this discussion. Please stay on topic.

most people fell in either of the 2 categories I mentioned earlier

Got any real stats to back up that claim? Because Bernie Saunders, quite apart from having nothing at all to do with Japanese anti-smoking/anti-pot laws, is not 'most people'.

those who do will be treated like criminals, have their lives destroyed

Smokers are already voluntarily destroying their lives. Both my parents destroyed their lives long before they were old enough to receive a pension. They were good, law-abiding people, and if cigs had been illegal they may well have lived long enough to see their grandkids grow up.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Smokers are already voluntarily destroying their lives.

Wow! It's their life to do what they want with it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Smokers are already voluntarily destroying their lives. Both my parents destroyed their lives long before they were old enough to receive a pension. They were good, law-abiding people, and if cigs had been illegal they may well have lived long enough to see their grandkids grow up.

Or maybe they would have died while in jail for possession.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Opioids should be legal for recreational use?... ok, if you believe that, even thou opioids do way more harm than Tabaco, why are you against Tabaco again?

I’m not against tobacco. I think people should have the right to smoke if they want to.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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