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Language schools learn harsh lesson as virus squeezes student numbers

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Guess what, ya'll aint the only one's! All the Japanese kids who want to study abroad aren't able to go either, and their "English" or what ever language they are going to study, school's are hurting too!

It's just a fact of life. One thing they COULD do, to keep interest in the prospective students, is do online lessons, a few hours, every day. And when they get here, the transition would be smoother for them as well.

I dont feel one bit of sympathy for some of these schools, many are in it for the cash, and dont give a crap about their students.

13 ( +15 / -2 )

@Yabaru, my sentiments exactly!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

As if these schools cared about their students, they’re now only pretending to.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

"If our students get infected, we are wondering whether our staff members are able to provide assistance to cover their daily living needs," said Hiroki Nagata, 42-year-old principal of the school.

"Wondering????" Damn,.....I hope this guy realizes that he sounds like one cold bastard here! You take your students money, you provide them with their student visa, you accept responsibility for educating them, and then you"wonder" as you throw them under the bus if they get sick?

I sincerely hope that YOUR school either gets a new "principal", or shuts down permanently, because I for one would never recommend sending anyone to your so-called "school" purely because of this sentiment!

And at 42 years old, I wonder just what kind of "principal" you really are??? More like some "son" of an owner, who put you in that position, without an iota of experience "educating" anyone!

4 ( +8 / -4 )

while part-time teachers were mandated to take time off, as employment issues add to the list of concerns.

This also shows just how much you "care" about people! I'll bet this "mandated" time-off means, without pay!

If you dont do anything for your staff, how in the world do you expect any sympathy from anyone about your "wondering" about how to deal with a student who might catch the virus!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Ok Yubaru, you have points, but actually ALL teachers are being mandated time off right now.

He is concerned for his students and teachers in this article, but you read each line in the most negative way possible.

He didn’t moan a student’s possible infection by saying it would lower his income.

So at the start of the state of emergency every elementary and kindergarten teacher that I work with has been assured their salary, but asked to take time off.

Few students mean few teachers are necessary and they try to make nobody take public transport, and do minimal shifts for the next 2 months.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Yubaru

It's just a fact of life. One thing they COULD do, to keep interest in the prospective students, is do online lessons, a few hours, every day. And when they get here, the transition would be smoother for them as well.

I currently attend language school in Japan, they are doing online lessons. From personal experience I'd say it is literally worse than nothing at all. I could learn more watching a YouTube lesson from someone who knows what they are doing, and actually wants to do it; than from watching someone talking to an iPad with no prior experience of distance learning.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Good time for teachers to develop their own online business. This week I have been trying out Zoom which is very good. We are changing our students to online instead of home visits.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Google meet works well, and has captioning as well! (Try it in English, and then speak Japanese and have a laugh how it gets written!)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

How are businesses supposed to get unskilled labor now?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I did a six-month course at the Osaka YWCA back in the early 1990s. I already had JPLT 2, so I went into a high-level class with Korean students who could read kanji for meaning. The course was mostly a leadup to JPLT 1 and lost its focus once the exam was over, but was still a great experience and easily value for money. Language schools get a bad rep from the disreputable ones being fronts for selling visas, but the one I went to was very good.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

From my friend who works in the local kuakusho told me only last evening there are so many foreigners who are homeless that include ESL language teachers and students. A scary time, everywhere.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

“And at 42 years old, I wonder just what kind of "principal" you really are??? More like some "son" of an owner, who put you in that position, without an iota of experience "educating" anyone!“

Looks like someone could use some reading lessons.

“Kazuhisa Tazuke, 52, principal of the school”

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Looks like someone could use some reading lessons.

How does it feel to have egg on your face? Problems with reading the entire article?

If our students get infected, we are wondering whether our staff members are able to provide assistance to cover their daily living needs," said Hiroki Nagata, 42-year-old principal of the school.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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