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Lawson donates 'onigiri' to daycare centers after school closures

14 Comments
By grape Japan

On Tuesday, many schools in Japan announced that they will be temporarily closing as a countermeasure against the ongoing spread of the coronavirus. In order to look after children (particularly those of working parents) who no longer have morning classes, daycare facilities normally open during after school hours are allowing children to come in during the day.

In response and as an effort to alleviate the concerns of providing meals for children, Japanese convenience store chain Lawson has announced they will be donating a total 30,000 onigiri (rice balls) to day care facilities (in batches of 10,000 over the next three weeks).

According to a Lawson press release, the convenience store will be delivering the rice ball batches (tuna mayonnaise, bonito flakes, salmon, and kelp fillings available). The rice balls are available in batches up to 200, or two per child. While they are being shipped on a first come first service basis, orders can be adjusted.

Orders can be made with a weekly deadline of Wednesday over the next three weeks, with more information available on the Lawson website.

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© grape Japan

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

14 Comments
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This is real Japan that we know :-)

8 ( +8 / -0 )

This makes me want to patronize Lawson more.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Great way to raise the bar Lawson and show support during a trying time. Excellent move.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Ok...Lawson you got me.....all my future convenie purchases are going your way....

Great and classy move!

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Good on you Lawson.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

In order to look after children (particularly those of working parents) who no longer have morning classes, daycare facilities normally open during after school hours are allowing children to come in during the day.

These are not "cay care" facilities! They are "gaku-do" or class rooms, most operated privately, although some are connected to existing elementary schools, and most receive some funding from local municipalities.

They are not juku either. They are a safe place for children to go until their parents get home. Also schools dont just have "morning classes" they are all day as well. Please stop trying to confuse people who are unfamiliar with the system here.

Day care facilities here in Japan are for senior citizens.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Niigata City's after- school program (until 6:30 pm weekdays; from 8- 6:30 during the long vacs, Saturdays, and school closures such as at present), Himawari Club, is run by the city and is available to children whose parents work during the day. While Niigata's facilities include classrooms, they are not primarily study halls but a kind of recreation and activity center. In fact, a quick search of such programs throughout the country reveals that 放課後児童クラブ, as they are known, are usually operated by municipalities, contrary to the assertion above.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Well done Lawson! I cant imagine many shops in other nations donating their goods to citizens in a crisis. Amazing generosity from Lawson, a great company.

Now, time for 7&i, MiniStop, Sunkus etc all to step up and donate their foods to the many in need!

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

@Fighto!

cant imagine many shops in other nations donating their goods to citizens in a crisis.

Really? You had to be the one to turn donations and goodwill into a competition between countries? Do you honestly believe it's never been done or not done often in other countries? Even in Japan, there will always be regular people and companies that try to help others during trying times. Happened during the earthquakes in Japan. Hurricanes in the states. Terror attacks in Europe.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

I cant imagine many shops in other nations donating their goods to citizens in a crisis

They do, cobber.

Sunkus

Seen many Sunkus shops around recently?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

 contrary to the assertion above.

In the article! Nothing you wrote contradicts anything I wrote. Notice the " ..." around the word "classrooms"?

Gaku-do are most definitely run privately as well! Got a couple of relatives that run one! Not to mention, in some locations the elementary schools have one ON their property, using an unused classroom as well!

Many also have buses or vans that pick kids up directly from the ES and take them home as well!

Jido club/gaku-do..are two different things, but are basically the same. I have volunteered at a "jido club" for well over 30 years now! Many have different "names" but are basically the same.

Their purpose is to keep an eye on the younger children, and give them a safe place to go, and stay off the streets!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Very smart. Thanks Lawson :-)

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Jido club/gaku-do..are two different things, but are basically the same. I have volunteered at a "jido club" for well over 30 years now! 

So, did the place you volunteer at apply for the free onigiri giveaway or not?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Seen many Sunkus shops around recently?

“As of September 1, 2016, all Circle K Sunkus stores have been rebranded as FamilyMart stores...”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circle_K_Sunkus

(smile)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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