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M5 quake shakes Kanto region; third in 4 days

30 Comments

An earthquake with a magnitude of 5 struck the Kanto region at 7:25 a.m. Wednesday. It was the third moderate quake to hit the region since last Sunday.

No tsunami alert was issued and there were no immediate reports of damage or injuries.

The Japan Meteorological Agency said the quake struck at a depth of 50 kilometers. Its epicenter was in southern Ibaraki Prefecture.

The quake registered an intensity of 4 on the Japanese seismic scale of 7 in Ibaraki, Tochigi and Saitama prefectures, and a 3 in Tokyo's 23 wards.

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30 Comments
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This is the same pattern we had just before the 3/11 big one!

-5 ( +9 / -13 )

There have been a number of quakes in the same general area of Ibaraki over the last year.

Stress relief here, inland, only builds stress closer to the plate boundaries. In this situation there are three plates converging, which have been locked up since the 1920s.

The 2011 quake aftermath has reset the entire length of the N. American/Asian and Pacific plate boundary north of Choshi, Chiba.

It is where the Philippine and the two aforementioned plates meet, just off the Boso Peninsula, that is the concern.

When it goes, look for a magnitude 8+.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I blame Pokemon Go.

Seriously - get your bug-out bags ready. LED flashlight, extra batteries, water, small tent if possible, keep your bathtub full with somewhat fresh water, make sure your TV and furniture are attached to the walls, determine with your loved ones a place to meet, keep some cash on you. Instructions are on the Net. I live in Kumamoto; some of these I had done; others, not but wish I had.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

Was damned good shaker here in north Chiba!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The bathtub thing is important. We didn't have water for a week after the April quake, and while you can go that long without a shower with no problem (especially if everyone else is doing so), flushing the toilet is a very, very big deal.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

This is the same pattern we had just before the 3/11 big one!

YES! I distinctly remember of number of random earthquakes in the years and months before 3/11!

Run for the hills!!

3 ( +8 / -4 )

I was up there a year ago today, on my way to the US, when there was a 5+. I was in Shinagawa Station and it was wild! The majority (one yesterday was in Chiba Bay) seem to be centered in southern Ibaraki.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Its not just the Kanto area. Kumamoto- and also there have been a few international quakes recently.

Seriously - get your bug-out bags ready. LED flashlight, extra batteries, water, small tent if possible, keep your bathtub full with somewhat fresh water, make sure your TV and furniture are attached to the walls, determine with your loved ones a place to meet, keep some cash on you. Instructions are on the Net.

Good advice. Never hurts to be prepared.. also if you have a car, make sure its tank is full. And if you are like me and have a baby, make sure that you are stocked up on baby food. Basic things like that. They've been saying for years that Tokyo is due for a big one. Fingers crossed...

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I am super prepared at home, but the likelihood of me being home when the big one hits is pretty low.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Mary Hinge,

This is the same pattern we had just before the 3/11 big one!

Rubbish! In Tohoku we were caught completely by surprise by the quake.

Laguna,

Seriously - get your bug-out bags ready. LED flashlight, extra batteries, water, small tent if possible, keep your bathtub full with somewhat fresh water, make sure your TV and furniture are attached to the walls, determine with your loved ones a place to meet, keep some cash on you. Instructions are on the Net. I live in Kumamoto; some of these I had done; others, not but wish I had.

Great advice! When the Great Tohoku Earthquake hit our water supply held up, but not everyone in our town was that lucky. Also, if you live in a high-rise, you will definitely lose water if the electricity supply fails, as pumps are used to circulate water. Lots of folks had to bring water up to their apartments from the ground floor.

I also hope you're recovering well in Kumamoto, Laguna. Earthquakes can certainly have a psychological as well as a physical shock.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

This is the same pattern we had just before the 3/11 big one!

Yes! It's called seismic activity!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Fuji=san going to pop...

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

this is a really cool site showing seismic activity in Japan http://www.japanquakemap.com/

0 ( +2 / -2 )

so you saying that everyone living in japan has to keep water in their bath?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

A lot of experts on here but there is no such thing as an expert earthquake predictor. Earthquakes cannot be predicted.

Keeping an emergency pack at home is a good idea. And if you have a car even better.

In response to some of the concerns here. Mount Fuji is not connected to Southern Ibaraki. There would be tremors in Kanagawa. There was no pattern a year before the Tohoku earthquake. Japan has reasonably sized quakes every week.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I've got a bad feeling about this.

Something very big is coming.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

so you saying that everyone living in japan has to keep water in their bath?

It makes sense in earthquakeland. Even if you have bottled water to hand for drinking, if you have a tubful of water you can flush the loo even if the water supply is down. And use it for washing, too, of course. And minor fire-fighting.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Sorry to say, Most companies that are International in Japan are taking this as a precursor to the 'big one' for Kanto.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

should I keep carps in my bath too as food ration or something? if it comes, it will come, water wont help you if your building built badly... keep an emergency pack if you feel you cant survive without it easily and dont panic

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

The 'big one for Kanto' will be situated south of Izu/ Shizuoka or Fuji in Kanagawa. Not southern Ibaraki.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

should I keep carps in my bath too as food ration or something?

If you absolutely cannot survive a week or so without eating something freshly killed and twitching, by all means sort out whatever you need. You might like to build a pond in the garden, more convenient than fish in the bathtub. Most folk however can manage with a few tins and some dry stuff. I found last time that having a couple of bags of flour in store was very handy when the shops were almost immediately out of bread, long-term.

Whatever suits your situation.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

should I keep carps in my bath too as food ration or something? if it comes, it will come, water wont help you if your building built badly... keep an emergency pack if you feel you cant survive without it easily and dont panic

You should keep whatever you want, and don't keep anything you don't want.

Some people feel that not getting rid of the bathwater until it's in the way makes sense though. If you don't, that's entirely fine.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

If you do keep water in the tub for emergency use, AND have very young children, remember to take precautions so they can't get in and drown. If you don't want to keep water in the tub, you might want to have an emergency toilet on hand, or know how to improvise one (and what is handy to have on hand to do so).

MsDelicious at Jul. 20, 2016 - 10:40AM JST "I am super prepared at home, but the likelihood of me being home when the big one hits is pretty low."

Even if you are not at home when an earthquake hits, you might be able, or need, to go home in the aftermath of one. Depending on the severity of the situation, you might be very glad to have emergency food and water supplies and such.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Better stock up on beer and chips, then. And several cases of wine. I can catch fish all day long and cook 'em up with my home-grown veggies.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If it happens, it happens.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

This is of concern... as I work in Tokyo area twice a week. I also ride the subway and the surface trains, to and from, it is a problem I must consider.

The frequency and the magnitude is definitely not a good sign. There is a definite possibility of a major quake in the near future. It has been predicted for many years now. Putting that together with the many disaster drills that are being conducted in the area by city and local governments, we must be prepared. For now, water and food supplies along with the daily necessities stored and replenished may be a good idea.

If this causes major exodus from the Kanto area, that is a big problem for Japan. So the key as most of you indicated above is not to panic but be prepared.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In addition to your bug-out kit, prepare a realistic survival kit for your home. A rain collection system is very useful. Also, better stock up on beer and chips, then. And several cases of wine. I can catch fish all day long and cook 'em up with my home-grown veggies. It's important to be as self-sufficient as possible, especially in emergency situations.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The 'big one for Kanto' will be situated south of Izu/ Shizuoka or Fuji in Kanagawa. Not southern Ibaraki.

Actually no. They say it will be wither Chiba or Southern Ibaragi..

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Alex Einz,

so you saying that everyone living in japan has to keep water in their bath?

I would say yes, but with one important proviso: seek advice if you live in a tall building. Water is heavy, and a typical bathtub full of water would weigh about 250 to 300 kg. If a quake was feared, or a heavy aftershock occured, there could be a building collapse if too many residents had filled bathtubs.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Some good points above. My bed has enough of a frame to hold a falling ceiling. After Kumamoto I restarted the old habit of not pulling the bath plug at night.

Keys, passports, credit cards, cash, spare charged phone batteries, matches/lighter, a multi-tool and a whistle in a grab bag. (A sub bag in the car?)

A few old-fashioned pyrethrum mosquito coils ('katori senko') could stop you getting bitten to death too in this hotter half of the year.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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