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Man given religiously forbidden food at Nagoya immigration center

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When in Rome eat natto. Perhaps a good chance for him to start embracing Japanese culture and try to assimilate, might help his immigration cause.

-18 ( +40 / -58 )

Man given religiously forbidden food at Nagoya immigration center

Anything can happen after they miserably failed providing health to their detainee, like failing mistake by failing to provide required food to their detainee.

In a separate case, the immigration bureau has been criticized for failing to provide appropriate medical services to a Sri Lankan woman who died in March despite complaining of stomach pain and other symptoms while in detention.

-8 ( +7 / -15 )

Oh, just try it. It won't kill you.

-9 ( +36 / -45 )

Hate Natto. Mistakes can happen and more careful inspection is needed.

9 ( +20 / -11 )

but the man had already eaten the food,

Isn't the onus on the man himself to ask about the ingredients before eating the food?

-6 ( +32 / -38 )

When international eyes are watching things are totally different in Japan. As the article points out how did the other lady die when complaining about stomach pain but suddenly the guards are concerned about the guys diet?

39 ( +42 / -3 )

I feel like an article of this nature is using a less serious issue (being fed, but making cultural errors) to make our overall Immigration detention methods not the main issue.

I mean reporting an instant soup with pork bits or something in it, isn’t the same as real abuse or suffering.

Its not a crime, just an error.

32 ( +34 / -2 )

According to most religion, it's still acceptable if the person who consume it didn't intentionally consume forbidden food. So it's a mistake that is forgiven in god eyes.

At least the person who made the error discover it and willing to tell the truth and apology for it.

20 ( +23 / -3 )

Hunger is more powerful than religion..

-1 ( +22 / -23 )

"Government agency makes mistake, apologises, vows to do better".

Watergate level stuff, this...

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Maybe the man should have gone to another country.

-7 ( +19 / -26 )

In all religions, banned foods are acceptable when no other food is available.

22 ( +27 / -5 )

The *infamous “**Nagoya Regional Immigration Services Bureau in Aichi Prefecture**” and the equally infamous*** fallback:

"We will make further efforts to treat each detainee according to his or her situation," -

the bureau [Who, specifically?] said in a statement.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Immigration Center and maybe prison too are all supposed to be prepared for this religion?

Sounds weird

0 ( +12 / -12 )

Oh, just try it. It won't kill you.

So, if you were locked up you would be happy to eat whatever was put in front of you?

Dog burgers? Bug meat tacos? Aborted baby saute?

Just because you don't find pork, or seafood, or whatever, religiously offensive/distressing, doesn't mean it's not a very real problem for others.

In all religions, banned foods are acceptable when no other food is available.

But other food was surely available, if only the facility had read the label.

4 ( +22 / -18 )

Agreed @thepersoniamnow7:34a:

- “I feel like an article of this nature is using a less serious issue to make our overall Immigration detention methods not the main issue.”

From a responsible, journalistic standpoint, that last “side note” paragraph *should** have *been referred to in the 1st/2nd paragraph when the specific facility was identified.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

- “it isn’t the same as real abuse or suffering.” -

Agreed. It disrespects the family & memory of Ratnayake Liyanage Wishma Sandamali who died by the gross neglect of the Nagoya Regional Immigration Services Bureau in Aichi Prefecture.

Note: previous articles, contents & comments regarding that incident have “expired”/been expunged.

2 ( +10 / -8 )

snowymountainhell

When something isn’t actually news, I wonder why its being made a headline.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Obviously his religion didn't teach him to be a good law-abiding citizen...now he's complaining about the food geez some people...

2 ( +19 / -17 )

Obviously his religion didn't teach him to be a good law-abiding citizen...now he's complaining about the food geez some people...

Oh, you're one of those binary thinkers that think morality and law are one and the same.

They're not.

7 ( +15 / -8 )

He'll survive

8 ( +16 / -8 )

Why in an immigration or detention center, everyone taste should be taken into account ?

This man should be happy that Japan tries to accommodate his religion in such a facility

10 ( +19 / -9 )

So it wasn't Kosher!? An apology will do and if the man accepts then it's case closed.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

If nobody said anything, would have have known?

5 ( +7 / -2 )

So, if you were locked up you would be happy to eat whatever was put in front of you?

This is what happens when you are detained, for whatever reason don’t break the law and you won’t be subjected to eat anything you don’t want or shouldn’t eat because of your religion. The person is in the detention center for a reason, the people or country that serves the food under no circumstances have to make special accommodations to any detainee if their laws were violated.

Dog burgers? Bug meat tacos? Aborted baby saute?

Then eat it or don’t.

Just because you don't find pork, or seafood, or whatever, religiously offensive/distressing, doesn't mean it's not a very real problem for others.

They’ll be ok. I’m a very sympathetic person when it comes to religion, but if you violate the law in anyway shape or form, you have to deal with the outcome, simple.

But other food was surely available, if only the facility had read the label.

They really don’t have to actually, as long as they’re not beaten, abused, raped and are fed, detainees don’t have any legal recourse to claim as long as they are properly clothed and fed. This is why I don’t travel to certain countries because I don’t believe in taking chances, that’s the nature of the beast when you travel.

3 ( +18 / -15 )

Religious reasons………..just eat.

Unless it’s poison, the sun will still rise tomorrow.

7 ( +16 / -9 )

Did they give him some pork by accident I wonder what the food was and be easy to recognize that guys religion

2 ( +7 / -5 )

One’s ‘faith & practices’ (an individual’s own choice) can maintain their ‘human dignity’ and sustain them further than someone’s ‘simpleton & cynical’ views of others:

@Kentarogaijin 7:44am: “Hunger is more powerful than religion”

He didn’t choose hunger over his beliefs in your mistaken assertion. It was an “error” by the staff.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

When an authority detains a person they also become fully responsible for the health and well being of the person including providing diets based on religions or beliefs.

-6 ( +9 / -15 )

simplistic

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

"Served" is not the same as "forced to eat." He/She should have asked and abstained if there was any doubt.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

Easy enough mistake to make and nobody died. Now if it's an allergy, let's say of peanuts and food containing peanut was given, it would have been fatal

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

While this was a mistake, supposing the man had a severe nut allergy and was served food with nuts?

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Headline is maybe a touch misleading; he wasn't intentionally given proscribed food, it was just an honest mistake. Most religions are even accommodating to this kind of thing.

If they were force-feeding or offering him solely proscribed food as a means of punishment, that would actually be an issue, but that doesn't seem remotely the case here. They made a mistake and apologised for it.

That said, there should be more care into checking dietary restrictions in these situations. Not because of preferences or religious reasons necessarily, but allergies are a thing. It isn't a good look for a detainee to die in custody because of an allergic reaction.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@StrangerlandToday  08:29 am JST

Oh, you're one of those binary thinkers that think morality and law are one and the same.

Yeah right you can read my mind that's amazing...

1 ( +8 / -7 )

The article doesn't say why this man was in detention? And maybe the question is allowed, why this person did not emigrate into a country where his religion is represented to a degree he is comfortable with? As a visitor you adjust, that is basic courtesy in every culture. Insisting on meals prepared according to religious beliefs while you seek status as refugee already shows that you are not willing to integrate. If he is not happy with his country governance he can change it perhaps?

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

For ‘*optics’; @personiamnow 8:12am; ‘transparency’; ‘full discloser’: any of the current PR/media terms used to ‘save face’ before *a wrong or mistake is discovered by western media. They know the world is watching, especially after the backlash against the detention center 5/25/21 for ‘claiming to be a victim themselvesafter the news of HER death:

- “Threatening letter sent to immigration center over Sri Lankan's death” -

Once again, please note that the previous articles, contents and any relative omments regarding that incident have also “expired” or been expunged for media sources.

- “The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.” -

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

They are in Japan, Japan doesn't have any obligation to give special meals to anyone, especially if the person in question is a non law abiding detainee. He should get whatever everyone else is being given and stop whining.

3 ( +15 / -12 )

They are in Japan, Japan doesn't have any obligation to give special meals to anyone, especially if the person in question is a non law abiding detainee. He should get whatever everyone else is being given and stop whining.

Exactly.

7 ( +17 / -10 )

yes food was not halal.

let me guess.

???

6 ( +9 / -3 )

@El Rata no, people in Japan’s immigration detention centers are not criminals, who anyway also have rights.

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20210701/p2a/00m/0na/020000c

“The detainees in the film are seeking protection as refugees, fearing persecution and oppression if they return to their home countries. However, in Japan, where the average rate of refugee status recognition over the past 10 years has been less than 1%, the chances of their applications being approved are slim to none. As a result, long-term detention against one's will has become common. In the midst of concerns about the spread of the coronavirus, the Tokyo Olympics, which the government is working hard to host, is based on the concept of "diversity and harmony." However, what the film brings to light is the exact opposite of that side of Japan, Ash says.

"They say 'Omotenashi, Japan is full of hospitality.' Yeah, my (expletive). Is this what you call hospitality?" one detainee said.

According to the immigration services agency, as of the end of 2020, there were 207 detainees who had been locked up for six months or longer. Of these, 41 had been detained for at least three years (the figure is the total for all facilities). 

There is no upper limit on the length of detention, and there is also no mechanism for a third party to judge the appropriateness of detention. The United Nations Human Rights Committee and other bodies have repeatedly called on the Japanese government to correct these conditions. In recent years, there have been a number of deaths at immigration facilities that appear to have been caused by long-term detention.”

This news seems just an Olympics-time cosmetic effort to equate the apology for the food mistake (which as pointed out by many is perfectly acceptable by all religions with dietary restrictions because of the circumstances) to the much needed efforts to treat asylum seekers with the dignity they deserve and especially avoid they get sick and even die in custody. None of them is complaining about the food - this was a press initiative by the detention center, not a reaction to a revolt - but all of them are complaining about the conditions, and so is the UN refugees agency.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

And so what? Japanese authorities do not have an obligation to serve special meals for detainees. However I think in this case this person in question should be given the opportunity to order such food at his own costs from outside. There are plenty of food delivery services everywhere in Japan - as long as you can pay of course out of your own wallet - why not? An immigration facility is not a prison for convicted felons.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

@El Rata

You nailed it!

And it's great to see the sympathizers on here too.

Immigration should have sent this individual back to where they came from quicker. Then they can eat whatever they want.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

But surely if he has specific dietary requirements, he would ask or check before eating the food? I have an allergy so I ask before I eat anything.

When it comes to religious dietary restrictions, the important thing is your intention to refrain from certain foods, it won't kill you like an allergy could.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Dawkins said it best: Religion is a distraction.

as mentioned above, 'he'll survive' 'would he have known if not told about it?' 'religions are accepting if the food is eaten by mistake or unknowingly'...so why do religions bother with such ridiculous restrictions in the first place? religion is truly humankind's biggest distraction.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

If it was a genuine mistake, and it sounds like it was, an apology should suffice.

I have zero time for religion, but I’m generally in favour of accommodating the more benign religious opinions as long there is no cost to the taxpayer.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

@louisferdinandc

people in Japan’s immigration detention centers are not criminals

They are, overstaying your visa or coming under false pretenses is a crime, thus making them criminals.

who anyway also have rights

Of course they do, that's why the detainee in question has been fed the same stuff everyone gets.

"They say 'Omotenashi, Japan is full of hospitality.' Yeah, my (expletive). Is this what you call hospitality?" one detainee said.

Well he is detainee bo a tourist bringing cash to the country, what was he expecting? a warm attitude? After breaking the laws of your host country don't expect to be treated nicely by the locals, and that applies to every country on earth.

The United Nations Human Rights Committee and other bodies have repeatedly called on the Japanese government to correct these conditions.

Sorry to hear that, but if Japan has such harsh and unfair immigration laws, why coming here in the first place, try Europe or a more immigrant friendly place.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Feel sorry for the guy but I am sure his God will forgive him.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Did they give him some pork by accident I wonder what the food was and be easy to recognize that guys religion

Pork is forbidden in more than one religion. Also, meat in general is forbidden in others.

And, even if the type of meat that is usually acceptable in some religions is not slaughtered according to their doctrines, it is then forbidden to eat.

So, no, not that easy to recognize that guy's religion.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Elrata, northern life - Nowhere is it stated in the article that the man actually complained about the food (after being told what it was). Nowhere is it stated that he demanded an apology from the authorities. If you have read elsewhere that this man made a fuss, do tell.

I too have been served food that did not comply with my religious requirements. What's different is that I knew that was the case. Not wanting to cause a fuss, and not wanting to appear ungrateful to my host, I said nothing and ate what was served to me. But it somehow came to the host's knowledge that I had such requirements, and they apologized to me (although I insisted an apology was not necessary).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The religion issue is really not an issue by itself. Japan has no obligation to follow any religion restrictions. The man should stay in his country if his religion forbids him to eat some food or any other activities. He can stay where he is if his goal is to impose his religion and customs on other countries.

What I find more problematic though is that he was supposedly just given a sachet of instant soup for lunch. This is really not

0 ( +5 / -5 )

This is really not a nice way with dignity to treat someone by giving him subpar food.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The religion issue is really not an issue by itself. Japan has no obligation to follow any religion restrictions. The man should stay in his country if his religion forbids him to eat some food or any other activities. He can stay where he is if his goal is to impose his religion and customs on other countries.

Not eating a particular food is not imposing his religion on another country. A vegetarian or teetotaler is not imposing his or her beliefs on others by abstaining from eating meat or drinking alcoholic drinks. They can even try to persuade others who are free to tell them where to stuff it.

Imposing is more like trying to get laws changed to accommodate their opinions or trying to censor opinions against their opinions or sensibilities.

They definitely should be told where to stuff it in that case.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

He'll eat what he is given. 'nuff said.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

why do religions bother with such ridiculous restrictions in the first place?

Two main reasons, as far as I can gather.

1) Back in the early days of budding religion, poor sanitary practices and lack of refrigeration made some foods in some environments, unhealthy. The strong possibility of food poisoning or parasites led to social leaders in those areas warning people off eating stuff that might reduce the congregation, and the custom stuck even when it was no longer necessary, partly because of inertia and partly because of 2).

2) Placing artificial limitations on what people were allowed to eat made it more difficult for them to enjoy a meal with people who did not share the same restrictions. Eating together is a way of bonding, and discouraging the congregation from bonding with outsiders was/is an effective means of preventing the faithful being contaminated by unbelievers.

Eat it, it's good for you.

Instant dried soup??

if you violate the law in anyway shape or form, you have to deal with the outcome, simple.

Do you know what law he violated to warrant his being treated with contempt? The article doesn’t say.

(I’m not saying the facility treated him with contempt, it seems to have been a genuine slip-up. Bit of an eye opener how many posters seem to think detention in an immigration facility deserves the suspension of human rights and even common decency. I wonder how many of the ‘he deserved it’ crowd have never broken the law? Stuff like illegal parking or driving over the speed limit have the potential to do way more damage than an expired visa or a claim for asylum, even a spurious one. Hand on heart and reflect hard, before you start throwing stones.)

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Instant dried soup??

They should ask for some water.

Do you know what law he violated to warrant his being treated with contempt? The article doesn’t say.

Apparently, something that he wasn’t supposed to do. I was detained one time 20 years ago for a day and the reason was because I did something I shouldn’t have been doing and I learned from that and never did that again, so if you don’t want to be detained or arrested, don’t do anything you’re not supposed to and you’ll be ok.

(I’m not saying the facility treated him with contempt, it seems to have been a genuine slip-up. Bit of an eye opener how many posters seem to think detention in an immigration facility deserves the suspension of human rights and even common decency.

They don’t have to. I have a friend that works in immigration and these people don’t play and they feel zero sympathy if you break the law, as it should be on any level.

I wonder how many of the ‘he deserved it’ crowd have never broken the law? Stuff like illegal parking or driving over the speed limit have the potential to do way more damage than an expired visa or a claim for asylum, even a spurious one. Hand on heart and reflect hard, before you start throwing stones.)

Been there done that and I just manned up and realized no one put me in the situation but myself. Don’t do the crime if you can’t do the time.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Try if you may to find any food label that does not have any pork particles etc. in it. Even those containers of cooked rice have a pork ingredient used for when cooking it so it becomes the right texture.

And no way are Halal or Kosher non-pork meats butchered here correctly for consumption. You can’t even get a steak cut correctly here let alone a chicken and cow butchered in a religious fashion. Sometimes you have to go with the flow so to speak.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Cleo: Judaism does not follow your rule number 2 at all.

We treat all outsiders as equals and it s a Mitva to share with all in need and to break bread with them even if it means less for you and your family. The stranger is always welcome and you must attend to them. Not sure about Muslims, but since both religions have the same prophets in general, I would assume similarities.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

I'm not sure in a detention centre a detainee who is Muslim or Jewish would be fed Halal or Kosher killed meats.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@Zichi: probably not fed meat at all. Not necessary for life as long as other products can combine and create full proteins, or at least get one egg boiled per day.

By the way, I eat anything served me to compliment the chef. And I do not eat until filled, because one never knows what more might be pulled out later in the evening.

I still love raw little neck hard shell clams stateside, but those were never added to dietary religious laws. I love food. So be it. We are the dominant animal on this planet at least until aliens arrive in mass.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Food is food.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Just to show that immigration center has dealt correctly over a situation, and did not lose face.

Exploiting a tsunami in a glass of water.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

He's lucky enough to have meals at detention centre. He should try request for Japanese dishes like seafood, soba, udon, somen, plenty to eat to avoid pork or beef etc.

The Japanese do not understand much about religious food restrictions. Can't blame the staff.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@louisferdinandcToday 10:59 am JST

The detainees in the film are seeking protection as refugees

In other words, it's not clear that they actually are legit refugees (and they probably are not, at least accoridng to the process).

there is also no mechanism for a third party to judge the appropriateness of detention.

Actually, there was an attempt, just recently, to introduce a "third party" - those little rights groups can vouch for a person, and the bureaucrat (eager to get responsibility off his shoulders) would likely approve it. Unfortunately, then the discussion turned to making these guarantors at least somewhat responsible for their own vouches, they balked, then that Sri Lankan women died and the hubbub from that buried that effort.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I wish Japan was as serious about vegan food as they are about halal food. Plant-based here means something that simply has soya-meat or some other 'vegan vegetables', regardless of what he other ingredients are. A Big Mac in Japan can be plant-based if you consider the fact it has vegan lettuce.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@zichi, i had to google natto beans, yes i can agree with you on this one, ill give them a miss to.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is actual state of country where sticked to hold pretended "Diversity and Harmony" Olympics.

Important issue like this are in the shade of Olympics among Japan's mainstream media.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The detention centre would have known the dietary requirements of the detainee-they just do not care…

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

That's what this space appears to be for...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Oooo boy Japan is bad at PR.

Doesn't seem that the man has lodged a formal complaint nor was anyone physically hurt so you'd wonder why they would make this a headline out of their own volition... Unless of course you've worked a single day in public relations lol wrong direction though

False displays of contrition only work if there's an actual offense. This story would never have come out if it wasn't the olympics and the same detention center wasn't in trouble for actual horrible treatment of its detainees in other instances. All this does is, actually, draw attention the story right at the bottom and makes them look worse. Good job, entry level PR graduate.

Yeah the guy shouldn't have been given the food in error and the error was corrected. No harm no foul at the end of the day.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The two most probable main cases are beef for a Hindu or pork for a Muslim. But we don’t know which one, because nowadays news , everywhere, not only here, are always news without the news. lol I can’t say about the first possibility, but if it was a Muslim given something with pork or anything else haram, it is absolutely no problem, because they consider all areas outside of Arabia or Muslim majority areas like Indonesia etc, as dar-al-harb, house of war, in a religious sense the enemy or unbeliever’s land, and in those areas or countries it is not an absolute must to abide to such rules, they are allowed to also eat pork if it is not avoidable or intentional. No problem. How did our parents say? As long as you have your feet under our table you just eat anything what is served. lol

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The two most probable main cases are beef for a Hindu or pork for a Muslim.

Or meat, for a Buddhist.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

In times past, the person responsible would be expected to atone for this error by commiting seppuku.

If bureaucrats today we're held to such standards, we would have a more humane and efficient government.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Oh, you're one of those binary thinkers that think morality and law are one and the same.

Yeah right you can read my mind that's amazing...

Your mind? No, just your post where you claimed it:

Obviously his religion didn't teach him to be a good law-abiding citizen...now he's complaining about the food geez some people...

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The buddhists I know, all cook and eat any usual meat, not in masses and mostly preferring much of vegetables added, but in no case completely meatless. That said, I think buddhists are also surely not so loud and radical to make a big news out of such a nothing and amplified into the world out of a quite closed detention center. That really smells like any other religion but not Buddhism.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They should just be grateful that they're offered food - so many on this planet will starve to death before the sun sets today, and then again tomorrow....... this religion stuff just promotes weirdness in so many ways and needs consigning to the dustbin of history.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

zichiToday  09:12 am JST

When an authority detains a person they also become fully responsible for the health and well being of the person including providing diets based on religions or beliefs.

Which kind of International treaties state that? Which country is actually practicing that? please enlighten us.

In ideal world, maybe yes, which you are talking about.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Surely religion has to do with the individual himself and his or her relationship to society. It's not about his body and what food he shoves into it. Not eating certain foods is material, not spiritual.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

“The detainees in the film are seeking protection as refugees, fearing persecution and oppression if they return to their home countries."

Yes, that's the official line. The reality is that the vast majority do not fear prosecution - they just have to claim that to get refugee status. They are here for other reasons. That's fine - I can't blame anyone for wanting to leave a bad country - though others here feel international travel should be a privilege rather than a right.

What this immigration center did to that poor Sri Lanka woman was simply murder - and they still haven't atoned for it. Giving somebody food that their religion proscribes is nothing really. Even the Dalai Lama eats meat when it is put in front of him, because he said it would be rude to the host not to.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Tokyo Joe: I like your comment but mate ! talk about trigger some readers , na, a lot. I assume they really dislike natto ?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What this immigration center did to that poor Sri Lanka woman was simply murder

REALLY? did it have murderous intent? or just not care whatsoever?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

kennyG

There are the general principles of detention in most civilised countries. When an authority removes the freedom of an individual through detention or imprisonment they also become responsible for the health and well being of the person. These are governed by national laws and international treatries.

Japan is a signature to the treaty of OHCHR.

https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/treatmentofprisoners.aspx

There are others like the European Court Of Human Rights.

All civilised countries care for those detained and imprisoned including providing healthcare and hospital care. Dentists and other needs. They also provide for personal hygiene like showers and exercise.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I'm not a lawyer but if he ends up in hell because of this, he should have a good legal claim against the authorities.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

zichiToday  06:42 pm JST

kennyG

There are the general principles of detention in most civilised countries. When an authority removes the freedom of an individual through detention or imprisonment they also become responsible for the health and well being of the person. These are governed by national laws and international treatries.

Thank you. but I chop your post into half up to the above, which I believe Japan is practicing actually.

Mt question was which country * *are actually providing diets based on religions or beliefs of each detainees and/or prisoners. personal belief can be infinite .

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Mt question was which country are actually providing diets based on religions or beliefs of each detainees and/or prisoners. personal belief can be infinite .

All civilised countries provide required diets for health or religious reasons.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@kennyGToday  07:57 pm JST

Basic principle

(1) The following rules shall be applied impartially. There shall be no discrimination on grounds of race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.

(2) On the other hand, it is necessary to respect the religious beliefs and moral precepts of the group to which a prisoner belongs.

Food

(1) Every prisoner shall be provided by the administration at the usual hours with food of nutritional value adequate for health and strength, of wholesome quality and well prepared and served.

(2) Drinking water shall be available to every prisoner whenever he needs it.

Religion

(1) If the institution contains a sufficient number of prisoners of the same religion, a qualified representative of that religion shall be appointed or approved. If the number of prisoners justifies it and conditions permit, the arrangement should be on a full-time basis.

(2) A qualified representative appointed or approved under paragraph (1) shall be allowed to hold regular services and to pay pastoral visits in private to prisoners of his religion at proper times.

(3) Access to a qualified representative of any religion shall not be refused to any prisoner. On the other hand, if any prisoner should object to a visit of any religious representative, his attitude shall be fully respected.

So far as practicable, every prisoner shall be allowed to satisfy the needs of his religious life by attending the services provided in the institution and having in his possession the books of religious observance and instruction of his denomination.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

When in Rome eat natto. Perhaps a good chance for him to start embracing Japanese culture and try to assimilate, might help his immigration cause.

Under the rules of Halel (origin: Arabic, or its Hebrew derivative, hallel/kosher), natto would be just fine. A better case of this is, for years, large vitamin marketers such as 'Big Box' stores and the usual suspects have been selling the 'gel' vitamins such as D or E with the words on the 'ingredients': "Gelatin (Porcine)" in very small font on the back. I saw this several years ago at my local Costco and made a complaint, well an 'advisement' since I have only humanistic interest, which, after several repeats to management finally resulted in the removal of any source information at all. Bovine, Ovine, no problem. But I suspect that MANY people have been unsuspectingly Haram just taking vitamins. So, if Japan has an accident with a porcine Cup Noodle but a native Nihonjin realizes it and attempts to correct the error, that is a large step ahead of an American guard who would just laugh and say "Tough ...!"

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The buddhists I know, all cook and eat any usual meat, not in masses and mostly preferring much of vegetables added, but in no case completely meatless.

And I know Hindus who eat beef, and Muslims who eat pork. What's your point.

That said, I think buddhists are also surely not so loud and radical to make a big news out of such a nothing and amplified into the world out of a quite closed detention center. That really smells like any other religion but not Buddhism.

Buddhism comes in all sorts of flavors, including genocide:

In August 2018, a study estimated that more than 24,000 Rohingya people were killed by the Burmese military and local Buddhists since the "clearance operations" started on 25 August 2017. ... There were also reports of mass killings of Rohingyas by the military and Buddhist vigilantes in Chut Pyin village near Rathedaung.

Oh sorry, did I get in the way of you trying to be bigoted against Muslims and Hindus? My bad.

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And I know Hindus who eat beef, and Muslims who eat pork. What's your point.

See? We have probably finally the same point. It has to be eaten, whatever is on the plate and regardless of any religious feelings. Otherwise we humans will quickly become hungry or starve to death. It’s that simple.

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So coping with different religious restrictions, particular allergy, vegetarian, organic followers...? Detention centers/prisons in what you call civilized countries must be serving gorgeous Buffet every day or ending up with miserable plates as greatest common divisor to be fair for all detainees/prisoners.

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An immigration facility in Nagoya said Monday it mistakenly gave a foreign male detainee a meal containing ingredients forbidden by his religion.

How bashful. Is it too hard to say that muslim inmate complained about pork curry? I hope the Japanese authorities do not fall for this typical superiority play. Private businesses can turn halal if they want, but tax-payer funded authorities should not spend money on custom-made cuisine.

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zichi

All civilised countries care for those detained and imprisoned including providing healthcare and hospital care. Dentists and other needs. They also provide for personal hygiene like showers and exercise.

"Health care" should not include catering to beliefs, which are entirely in the recipients mind. At least in a sane society.

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I know of people who would do anything to be in this man position. A air-conditioned room, a futon and bedding which is washed regularly, a common room to socialise, 3 nutritus meals a day and green tea on hand at any time. All this for free. If you compare this to a stay at the Olympic village, the detainee come out on top. It seem to me a lot of commentators on this subject, have never had a hard days living in their lives. Right now there is a 12 year old Afghani working a 16 hour shift in a coal mine pushing tailings up a 15 degree shaft for a USD $2 a shift. Plus he as to supple his own batteries for his head lamp.

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Judaism does not follow your rule number 2 at all.

We treat all outsiders as equals and it s a Mitva to share with all in need and to break bread with them even if it means less for you and your family. The stranger is always welcome 

Am I right in thinking it's a one-way street, though? Inviting strangers to break bread with you and share your restricted diet is a way of bringing outsiders into the flock and making them an insider.

The number 2 'rule' (not really a rule, more a gambit by the group leaders) works to bring outsiders into he group, while discouraging members of the group from straying from the straight and narrow. If you're starving it's a different story of course, but if you're invited socially to a meal at someone's house and you know they'll likely be eating something forbidden to you, you either refuse the invitation (preventing bonding with outsiders) or accept and then refuse parts of the meal prepared for you, thus upsetting your hosts (and marking yourself as separate from and incompatible with that particular group.)

 Is it too hard to say that muslim inmate complained about pork curry? 

We don't know if the inmate was Muslim or some other religion.

He didn't complain.

It's clearly stated that it was a cup of dried soup, not pork curry.

I hope the Japanese authorities do not fall for this typical superiority play.

What typical superiority play? The one where the facility official realised he'd made a genuine mistake and tried to rectify it but was too late? And apologised?

The only typical superiority play I'm seeing on this thread is the 'Everyone in an immigration centre is a hardened criminal and should be force-fed pork.'

tax-payer funded authorities should not spend money on custom-made cuisine.

Tax-payer funded authorities should not spend money on mass-produced, processed junk like dried soup.

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Given the description in the story, I presume that the miso soup contained ebi. I expect that he was put on the vegetarian option diet (this is normally the default option when dealing with Muslims), but the soup got in by mistake.

I have actually discussed with Muslim friends about travelling to Japan in holiday and normally advise against it if they are strict. To eat widely and avoid food that has not been near mirin, prawn, or meat stock of pork or non halal meat is very hard. Vegetarians have a hard enough time living in Japan.

Personally I dislike religion and the shadow that iron age Mediterranean and desert cultures still have on humanity, but you have to respect it.

But what I do see above is a frankly unpleasant glee among some posters at seeing a Muslim being served food that runs counter to their religious beliefs.

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 Private businesses can turn halal if they want, but tax-payer funded authorities should not spend money on custom-made cuisine.

for those who conduct illegal acts. Yes. This is it. Let private companies do whatever to Omotenashi them.

Follow the law and behave yourself so as not to get detained, or prisoned. That is the very 1st MUST, otherwise, don't even think cross the borders to travel into totally different culture.

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Only if you pay just a bit of attention, you would never have to stay at so called detention centers, not to mention, prison. How come those hypocritic human rights worshippers ignore the principle

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Years ago I had a student from a predominantly Muslim country who was quite a wit and quickly learned various taboo words in Japanese. My guess is that he was not terribly concerned about what is "halal" in regard to the ladies...One evening there was an "international" gathering, at which the fare was carefully distinguished. There were large signs that warned in English: PORK...BEER. As I sipped on my forbidden drink and he on his orange juice, I asked him in English, which he spoke quite well: "Suppose a devout Muslim accidentally ate pork. Might he be forgiven?" "Allah the All Merciful," he replied, "would no doubt consider the matter with compassion. I believe, though, of course, I cannot know His Will for certain, that the poor man might be given a second chance." "Ah," I went on, "but suppose someone became so cross-culturally curious that he deliberately allowed a small morsel of pork to go down his gullet..." "Well, in that case," my student responded with a very serious expression, "he would be in very, very deep ****!" (I belong to another religious tradition, one with its own rather strict rules, which I generally support, but I nonetheless somehow hope that the young man was putting me on.")

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