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Man saved after falling onto tracks at Shinjuku station

25 Comments

An office worker rescued another man who had fallen onto the tracks at Shinjuku station on Tuesday, police said Thursday.

The incident occurred at about 11:30 p.m. at the JR Sobu line platform, according to the Tokyo Fire Department. After the man fell off the platform, the 36-year-old man jumped down and pulled him to safety just before the incoming train arrived. The first man suffered minor injuries to his head in the fall.

The Tokyo Fire Department did not say what caused the man to fall off the platform. The man who fell told authorities that he plans to send his rescuer a letter of gratitude.

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25 Comments
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Send him cash.

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drunk, right?

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No doubt drunk.

A decent meal out somewhere would be nice, in addition to a letter.

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"Dear -----san, Thank you for saving my life. I want to go drinking with you and I would do the same for you as you did for me. The fire department does not know how I fell on the tracks before midnight. Lets go drinking this Saturday. PS. Do you know any girls?"

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Send him cash.

Cash awards/rewards are very rare, issuing paper certificate is a common practice in Japan, Asia's largest economy.

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the 36-year-old man jumped down

Great job man, Bravo! Media should publish this great man name. JR should also give him some reward.

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Woo hoo! Some good news! Another train track hero!

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I think there's nothing wrong with a certificate. It would make one hell of a talking point at a job interview, "Ahh, I see your hobbies including saving people who fall onto train tracks.. do you do this often, because our bonenkai could really use someone like you!" ;)

Cash you spend and it's gone, but a certificate like that ... man, that's mantlepiece material... if any house in Japan had a mantelpiece that is.

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A gift card to Isetan or Seibu would be nice.

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Easy solution. Get the station staff or cops to block entry through the ticket gates to anyone who is too hammered to walk straight. Allowing extremely drunk people to walk into your train station is asking for trouble and lacks responsibility for safety regulations. Train stations are not public places, they are privately owned.

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Good citizen, good man.

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Easy solution. Get the station staff or cops to block entry through the ticket gates to anyone who is too hammered to walk straight. Allowing extremely drunk people to walk into your train station is asking for trouble and lacks responsibility for safety regulations. Train stations are not public places, they are privately owned.

They should install breathalyzers next to the Pasmo/Suica pads.

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If JR charges families of rail suicide victims for disrupting service, wouldn't it make sense to reward the rescuer monetarily for a disaster that was avoided as well?

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northlondon. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! It is about time that someone proposed that solution.

I am sick to death of the smell of vomit on trains! I am tired of drunk men who are old enough to know better falling on me or bashing me with their cases. I am tired of spending the hour long ride home worried some dim moron is going to puke any moment.

Teach these legions of alcoholics a lesson. Bar them from getting on the train if they are too drunk. Kick them off the train if they are too drunk. Put them out of the station if they are too drunk.

Since the Taxi companies and train lines are often owned by the same groups, the Taxis can take on these drunken folks and hopefully the racked up taxi fees will encourage them to stop drinking so much.

And we get the added benefit of saving sober heroic people from risking their lives to save people who should not be allowed around trains to start with.

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letters? who cares! take him out to kyaba

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JR and other public transportation services should implement the same rules as airlines do. Any behavior that endangers the lives of others should not be tolerated. Drunk people at train stations are particularly dangerous as they endanger other lives clearly as illustrated in this article. Being drunk on board equally endangers the lives of passengers. Japan needs to implement similar rules as the U.S. Drinking in public - illegal. Excessively drunk in public - illegal. There are kids on these trains and they see this. Time to get our ducks in a row.

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Northlondon:"Easy solution. Get the station staff or cops to block entry through the ticket gates to anyone who is too hammered to walk straight. Allowing extremely drunk people to walk into your train station is asking for trouble and lacks responsibility for safety regulations. Train stations are not public places, they are privately owned."

You would think common sense like that would prevail, but hey. haha. Anyway, good idea, and probably even cheaper than installing the safety/guard rails or what have you.

Anyway, always happy to read a story like this instead of the unfortunately more prevalant cases where the person is NOT rescued, or worse the rescue fails and both parties die. I hope the guy wasn't drunk and just fainted or something, but since it's pretty much always the cause (and check the comments), it wouldn't surprise me. Nonetheless, a letter sounds pretty good, at the very least.

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Yay! Good news.

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Gantz?? for a second there I thought it was a publicity stunt for the upcoming movie.

But kudos to the man who risked his life.

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Do the train/subways stations in Japan have a cut-out under the platform where a person can dive to if they fall off the platform? I know the stations in Wash D.C. have such a lip to allow you to get clear of the train without having to try and climb back up first.

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The first guy was either drunk or thinking of suicide. It's hard to tell if someone really intended to "jump down" because when you're drunk it'll look like that. Plus the guy injured his head and had enough time to be rescued. We just don't have enough information to tell either way from this article.

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smithinjapan I'd like to see you try that for 8 hours a day standing behind the gate counter with another job to do. Didn't think so.

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Do the train/subways stations in Japan have a cut-out under the platform where a person can dive to if they fall off the platform? I know the stations in Wash D.C. have such a lip to allow you to get clear of the train without having to try and climb back up first.

Yes many stations do.

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Don't let drunks rides the trains? Are you guys serious? I was once on an almost empty, late night train (Seibu Shinjuju line) coming back into Shinjuku when at one stop the station staff threw a comatose drunk ONTO the train. As the doors closed they walked away looking very pleased with themselves for solving their problem. With that kind of mindset out there, somehow I don't think the no drunks idea is going to go far.

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This office worker is the real "Densha Otoko."

Great job!

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