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Many typhoon deaths occurred while victims were traveling in vehicles

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50 centimeters is all it takes. Water is powerful.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Some of the vehicular victims of the Hagibis typhoon could have thought the worst was over. Just like the couple in the first article after the typhoon thought as the typhoon had passed with no flooding. When they awoke the next day their first floor was submerged.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I would have thought, the safest is to go stay with a neighbour that has a two storey house and not travel anywhere.

The authorities most likely have enough on their hands without all the extra burden of working out evacuation regimes for different locations.

Having lived in many different flat Asian countries, it's common knowledge that flooding can occurs almost immediately. It depends on where the rain falls, intensity, and maintenance of stormwater drains etc.

If flooding persists, it's probably safer for authorities to distribute necessities from watercrafts also.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Better to follow and listen about the warning news, than feel sorry later.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Many of the victims are also retired, in the seventies and above...out in the rain?

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Tricky one, this. The government warnings have become much stronger, but at risk people are still failing to evacuate or leaving it until the last minute. It is tempting to blame the government for everything that happens in Japan, but that may not be appropriate here.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Many of the victims are also retired, in the seventies and above...out in the rain?

As you can imagine, elderly people rely on cars for transport. I guess many underestimated the risks. "Oh 20 cm water, im in a car, dry, I can still make it." and then "Oh 40cm, I can still girigiri make it", that kind of thinking is risky. Then again, NOONE could foresee this. This should be a lesson for all of us.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

They should follow government instructions and finish evacuating or traveling early. If they leave too late, they shouldn't go outside, but just stay on the upper floors of a building

I'm sure the next step Japan would take to fix this problem is to make it illegal to drive during a typhoon.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

maybe don't drive in a typhoon?

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Doors of cars come to not to open by water pressures.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

One other problem is that most cars now have automatic windows so once the engine dies, you can't open them and climb out like you used to be able to with roll-up windows.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Regarding water pressure on doors and automatic car windows, you should carry a hammer to break a window. They sell mini ones you can keep in the car permanently. To be honest though, things are already messed up if at risk person is in this situation. Even getting out of the car may not save an eighty year old.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Some people just don't listen to warnings until it's too late, who's really at fault? I remember my building had a fire alarm and I got out as soon as possible and maybe like 4 other people left as well, and this is a tall building with many families living in it and the alarm happened in the middle of the night so surely most people would have been home. It was deemed to be a false alarm and they shut it off, but I was absolutely shocked at how few people evacuated, if you wait until you can actually see the fire it's probably too late and you will have died for no reason whatsoever.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

10 victims found in or near their cars. NHK issued warnings about not driving in typhoons.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

One of the problem with the warning systems in Japan is that the same systems are used for all sorts of unnecessary messages. "It is lunchtime now", "It is time for children to go home", "Don't let your dog run around withour a leash", and so on. And this is every single day. Consequently, people do not pay attention to the messages.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

maybe don't drive in a typhoon?

"But I just wanted some instant noodles from 7-11, I figured it would be OK!"

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

Each of these deaths happened in a different way, so it is hard to generalize. One car was going to help a relative who phoned saying they were stuck and needed rescuing. At least one car was safely on the way to the evacuation point when it started driving through deeper and deeper rising water. Mostly in the dark, it is hard to judge how deep the puddle ahead might be. Another car on a straight road could see the flashing lights of a fire engine on the bridge ahead and tried to reach it, but in between a dark current was sweeping across the fields and across the road and that car too got swept away.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

really very sad stories :(( I hope more can be done to stop this kind of thing in future

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I drove over to Chiba through the aqualine on Saturday and almost every other house i saw around the central area has damage to the roof or walls. The buildings where the windows were blown in have almost been completely destroyed by the wind and rain blowing through. A very different story to Tokyo.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Too much trouble for Japanese to evacuate.

Or do or change anything.

Unless it's absolutely necessary.

My Japanese parents are same.

They cannot even change their expensive Docomo phone plan to a cheap one, and calling only.

My offers to help is always, it's OK from them.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

so basically , people die because they don't heed qualified advice.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

One other problem is that most cars now have automatic windows so once the engine dies, you can't open them and climb out like you used to be able to with roll-up windows.

This is not true. Electric windows do not require the engine to be running in order to function - they will do that with the ignition on.

The problem is that once water gets into the car's electrical systems, there's no guarantee they will function normally; this includes door locks as well as windows. As such, your only sure-fire way of getting out is to bail while you can still open the doors and, if all other options are closed off, scramble up onto the roof.

That said, one should not be driving around in typhoons let alone flood waters.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Still probably preferable to walking...

2 ( +3 / -1 )

You know, I'd swear there were posters here, not too long ago claiming that typhoons weren't all that.

And now they're lambasting victims for having the temerity to go outside and/or be old.

Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

RIP to the victims.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Age plays a major factor in surviving natural disasters. The truly young and old are more likely to be victims.

Most of the people in this cars were elderly. Emergency car kits should include a spare tire, flares, pocket knife, a car jack, jumper cables, road reflectors, physical map, sometimes a blanket, maybe a flare gun, flashlight, glass breaker, and seatbelt cutter.

The last two in particular should be inside the car like a glove compartment or a pocket knife on the person at all times.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japan is built to withstand typhoons and earthquakes, to a greater measure than many other places.

But when the seas send out tsunami, the wind rips away your roof and topples power lines, and the lashing rains burst countless river banks, your infrastructure will get tested to the nth degree.

Move early to those assembly points, or stay home, second floor, and in a room facing away from the mountainside.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

As such, your only sure-fire way of getting out is to bail while you can still open the doors and, if all other options are closed off, scramble up onto the roof.

Pressure from the water outside can make it hard to open. I learned that if a person is in a submerged vehicle, they actually have to wait while holding their breathe until the car totally fills up then open the doors once the pressure is balanced.

That is easier said than done when you are panic in an emergency. The other option is to use a tool to cut your seatbelt and shatter the glass.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The 600cc yellow plate golf carts with mirrors and turn signals probably don't improve anyone's chances, but simply put, even a shallow depth of fast-moving water carries massive force.

These deaths are likely the result of panic and irrational decisions.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

@CaptDingleheimer

These deaths are likely the result of panic and irrational decisions...

I suppose you would have known what to do in the same situation kept your cool had a life hammer in your car maybe some life jackets...suppose its pretty easy when your sitting behind a computer...

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Despite all warnings...still people have the tenacity to challenge nature to see what will be the outcome. Because they have to experience something no one else has. Ignorance prevails and claims lives. So sad. RIP to all those who perished.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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