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Mayor struggles with loss of wife and duty to city destroyed by tsunami

8 Comments
By Shingo Ito

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© 2012 AFP

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8 Comments
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instant respect !!.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"trying to rebuild a city that was virtually wiped from the map by last year's tsunami"

In the same place? Incredible...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Fudai in Iwate-ken survived the onslaught of waves because the long-departed mayor looked at how high the 1933 tsunami was and told his subordinates that the seawall should be built 15 meters higher. They nearly laughed him out of town. In the aftermath of the latest tsunami, his grave is decorated as if he was a hero....and he is.

5 ( +3 / -0 )

Well, what is the biggest tsunami ever recorded? Make the seawalls bigger than that, and then...pray. Personally, I agree that people really should not live right on the beach in these disaster areas.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Japanese technology masters the science of anti-tsunami walls just like it does for Fukushima plant. Should Tokyo spend the money in the equipment, garnish the pockets of the concrete industry and lie to inhabitants "now you are safe..." ?

That is a grossly inaccurate statement. One town, whose name I can't remember, survived because they built an anti tsunami wall that 'mastered the science'. The reason the wall failed in Rikuzentakata was because the tsunami was significantly larger than expected. The reason the wall failed in Taro was because the tsunami was significantly larger than expected, the reason the wall failed in Minami Sanriku was because the tsunami was significantly larger than expected.

The reason the town I mentioned survived is because they built bigger than they thought neccesary.

In many places the citizens felt that their 10 m tsunami wall would protect them but it failed because the wave was so much bigger than expected. That's not to say that there aren't holes in the sea walls - there are. I've seen them, however I couldn't possibly say whether that was cause by the wave coming in or the wave going out with all of the debris.

It's clearly possible to build a tsunami proof wall but it has to be big and it has to be regularly maintained.

1 ( +3 / -3 )

I remember this story last year and I felt very sorry for this man. You have a job with great responsibility, and you can't even leave to save your own family. I don't wish this to happen to anyone.

3 ( +2 / -0 )

That's very sad, but he should leave... If he rebuilds there, in a few decades, that will be his sons and grand-kids in next disaster.

“All I can do for her now is to help rebuild this city

Yes, do it... but in another location.

no decision made on whether Tokyo will buy land in tsunami-hit zones and rebuild breakwaters—the fundamental starting point for reconstruction.

When a place has been taken back to sea several times, is it even efficient ? One of the videos that shocked me the most was the one of that giant anti-wave gate that firemen were trying to close as the tsunami arrive, and just when they did, the wave made the whole stuff burst open. Japanese technology masters the science of anti-tsunami walls just like it does for Fukushima plant. Should Tokyo spend the money in the equipment, garnish the pockets of the concrete industry and lie to inhabitants "now you are safe..." ? Or should they encourage and help financially each family to relocate in a safer town, nearby, or anywhere in Japan ?

1 ( +4 / -2 )

Great but sad story story. Good luck sir.

8 ( +6 / -0 )

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