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Monument to comfort women dedicated in Virginia

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The state of Virginia matters to the world about as much as my voice does in congress....

5 ( +16 / -11 )

Good on ya, Virginia!

I must admit it was my misreading of the headline that brought me to the story, though...

-13 ( +5 / -18 )

Good for Virginia. California, New Jersey and now Virginia with the Mr Honda a Japanese American House rep formally demanding Japan to offer an official apology to the remaining surviving women who were raped and forced into sexual salvery by the imperial Japanese governement. Hopefully this will never happen again

0 ( +15 / -15 )

Japan’s embassy in Washington said that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe stood by Tokyo’s “sincere apologies and remorse” for comfort women’s “immeasurable pain and suffering” and did not want the issue to be “politicized.”

I find it ironic that Abe doesn't want to 'politicize' the suffering of these women, yet for decades Japan has been actively politicizing suffering of its own citizens caused by the atomic bombings, partially by helping set up Hiroshima-Nagasaki monuments worldwide — and these monuments have been positively embraced by the communities hosting them.

Some examples being: the Hiroshima Stone in New Zealand donated by Hiroshima City, the Hiroshima Peace Bell given to Honolulu by Hiroshima Prefecture, Hiroshima Peace Trees in the UK, Indonesia, India, Denmark and many other locations worldwide.

4 ( +11 / -7 )

If the Japanese government would just shut up about this, nobody would even notice this. Does anyone really think that US tourists will be rushing to see a statue of comfort women?

-3 ( +8 / -11 )

A cursory Google search does not indicate that Virginia - a former slave state and home to Robert E. Lee - has any monument dedicated to those it enslaved for hundreds of years. Just a thought.

10 ( +21 / -11 )

A cursory Google search does not indicate that Virginia - a former slave state and home to Robert E. Lee - has any monument dedicated to those it enslaved for hundreds of years.

@Laguna

Virginia has at least two such monuments: Richmond Slavery Reconciliation Statue and the Booker T. Washington national monument. There are probably others.

16 ( +20 / -4 )

The Korean American community needs to remember that they are American first. This pointless dredging up of old issues and opening old wounds only serves one purpose: to drive Korea into the Chinese sphere of influence. It has been plain for a while that Korea sees itself as having more of a future by kissing up to red China than remaining with the free world.

The statue itself? Meh. Next, I'd like to see the Vietnamese American community erect a statue beside it to commemorate the thousands of innocent Vietnamese civilians butchered by Korean soldiers during the Vietnam war.

18 ( +25 / -7 )

Sensato

Virginia has at least two such monuments: Richmond Slavery Reconciliation Statue and the Booker T. Washington national monument

Virginia is a state, not a nation.

-11 ( +4 / -15 )

The Korean American community needs to remember that they are American first.

Nope. They need to remember their families before that. And even before that, they need to be decent human beings. Part of being a decent human being is empathy, and that is something that comes from understanding the suffering of others and requires reflection, something a memorial provides.

This statue is not just about Koreans or Korean Americans. Its dedicated to all women who were made sex slaves by Imperial Japan.

And while we are on this, I have to ask, would you say the same about all the Holocaust memorials in America? Surely you realize those were erected by Polish Americans, and German Americans and Dutch Americans etc?

-2 ( +10 / -12 )

SensatoMAY. 31, 2014 - 05:30PM JST Japan’s embassy in Washington said that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe stood by Tokyo’s “sincere apologies and remorse” for comfort women’s “immeasurable pain and suffering” and did not want the issue to be “politicized.” I find it ironic that Abe doesn't want to 'politicize' the suffering of these women, yet for decades Japan has been actively politicizing suffering of its own citizens caused by the atomic bombings, partially by helping set up Hiroshima-Nagasaki monuments worldwide — and these monuments have been positively embraced by the communities hosting them. Some examples being: the Hiroshima Stone in New Zealand donated by Hiroshima City, the Hiroshima Peace Bell given to Honolulu by Hiroshima Prefecture, Hiroshima Peace Trees in the UK, Indonesia, India, Denmark and many other locations worldwide.

And why is it so upsetting to Japanese to see a monument commemorating comfort women, while they are okay having Hiroshima monuments around the world. My Japanese students became visibly agree when they read about comfort women in class. I was dumbfounded. Why the sensitivity and defensiveness - do Japanese want to maintain an international image that they are somehow pure and perfect?

I wouldn't get upset if there were a monument of the Hiroshima bombing or Vietnamese village massacres in my town - in fact I would welcome it - those US servicemen committed a heinous crime, and so did the Japanese administration and military for having comfort women.

What gives? Difference in culture?

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

I am already sick and tired of this. I think it is utterly stupid for Koreans twisitng and fabricating the truth,. 200000 confort women, if there had been that many, most of them were merely prostetutes, or being sold by their own parents because of poorness. I won't bother to put any URL link , because JapanToday will remove my post. But the truth will come when it is ready.

Same thing Dokto island campain by Koreans, twiting the truth, but refuses to go to International Counrt while Japan is happy to.

Shame on you, Korea!

-7 ( +13 / -20 )

Japan has apologized--numerous times. Someone should remind the Koreans of this.

If the Koreans truly wanted to fight against human trafficking, they would build monuments to human trafficking; not create more friction between a former colony and it's previous owner.

4 ( +16 / -12 )

No news about this in CNN several channels. Too busy in Arizona VA Hospital scandals detailed stories and LA Clipper sales stories.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Good on Virginia! Keep it coming, people! The more people point out the denial here in Japan, the better the chance they may one day actually come to grips with the wrong doings of the past.

-11 ( +10 / -21 )

Chris KuchmaMAY. 31, 2014 - 07:47PM JST

Japan has apologized--numerous times. Someone should remind the Koreans of this. If the Koreans truly wanted to fight against human trafficking, they would build monuments to human trafficking; not create more friction between a former colony and it's previous owner.

please tell me how the monument creates friction.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

hachikouMAY. 31, 2014 - 07:19PM JST I am already sick and tired of this. I think it is utterly stupid for Koreans twisitng and fabricating the truth,. 200000 confort women, if there had been that many, most of them were merely prostetutes, or being sold by their own parents because of poorness. I won't bother to put any URL link , because JapanToday will remove my post. But the truth will come when it is ready.

And it is precisely this type of right-wing informed, or I should say 'misinformed', attitude that is fuelling anti-Japanese sentiment, and not just in Korea and China any more.

-3 ( +11 / -14 )

i think and as some already mentioned, building such memorials also shows a basic humanity or humane feelings to the victims especially those still living among us,,do you rather bring sad memories to the remaining victims rather than making them feel cared for, making them happy?

well, i think japan should be thankful to these efforts, for (i think and many might agree) it is them, who should build and commemorates such beautiful monuments in the first place, which is quite a difficult thing to do with current domestic trends.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

How childish.

1 ( +10 / -9 )

The right and proper place for this memorial would be Tokyo.

Anywhere else isn't quite right....

3 ( +9 / -6 )

I am Virginian, if that has any relevance:

@OldSanno: States can have national monuments in them. It doesn't mean they "own" them, but there was nothing wrong with Laguna's statement that Virginia has a national monument. Much like there are "National" forests or parks.

@Kuribo1: Virginia has the world's largest naval base. It houses a good many of our aircraft carriers and submarines. We also have Langley, which is one of the CIA's head branches. I could go on. My point is that, while the world may not care about the specifics like Korean monuments AND while many may be ignorant on the details, Virginia does, in fact, matter very much to goings-on in the world.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

I am so tired of this nonsense. Yeah, I said, NONSENSE.

Japan apologised a long time ago. The women did not get money from the Japanese government when a treat was signed soooooo many years ago even though the J-gov officials tried to pay people directly. The South Korean President himself said that he would take care of the issue and it was not necessary. He didn't. The agreement was that the South Korean government and its people would no longer ask for apologies of money again. BOTH PARTIES AGREED. South Korea has breaking that promise. They are acting like children by taking this to a third country that has nothing to do with it.

Even though I feel great sympathy for the women who actually were forced into prostitution, many of them were not and did so at their own will to provide for their families and there is a lot of proof of that. Japan has done enough. Frankly I hope the statue gets taken down.

2 ( +14 / -12 )

"brothels for imperial Japan’s soldiers."

Hard to believe those Japanese soldiers would have a need for brothels, as they were quite charming and genki and had women falling in love with them left and right, no? OK, maybe not...

This is a serious black mark on Japanese history.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Korean-Americans who support this movement can all give up their US citizenship and go home as far as I am concerned. The Comfort Women they are "memorializing" were military prostitutes that served our enemy in WWII. How they ended up there is not the issue. Would be put up monuments for the women who worked in the wartime brothels run by Nazi Germany as well? Wouldn't Korean-American support for US soldiers who died in the Korean War for South Koreans be a more appropriate monument to be placed on U.S. soil?

-1 ( +16 / -17 )

I should add, Japan has apologised numerous times. Has that information like the extreme amount of money that Japan paid South Korea so long ago something that they did not hear about until 2006 as well? Without that money and technology that Japan passed on to South Korea, it would not be in its current financial situation. This idea of never forgetting is only damaging relations between the two countries. Those people who did those terrible things are mostly LONG GONE and the only thing that this is doing is promoting a dislike in the US of Japanese people over an issue that ended more than 70 years ago and it is ruining relations between the two countries. WE can not leave in peace with a belligerent country that only wishes to vilify its neighbours for financial means. The South Koreans need to be attacking their own president, of whose father was the very same man that agreed to the terms that were laid out and denied the South Korean women financial compensation from the willing Japanese government at the time. It is THIER fault.

2 ( +13 / -11 )

soukaMAY. 31, 2014 - 08:58PM JST i think and as some already mentioned, building such memorials also shows a basic humanity or humane feelings to the victims especially those still living among us,,do you rather bring sad memories to the remaining victims rather than making them feel cared for, making them happy? well, i think japan should be thankful to these efforts, for (i think and many might agree) it is them, who should build and commemorates such beautiful monuments in the first place, which is quite a difficult thing to do with current domestic trends.

Yes, why isn't Japan constructing these monuments themselves - now, That would give them massive street-cred in the International community and might even turn the tide of poor relations between Japan and it's neighbours.

1 ( +9 / -8 )

Wouldn't Korean-American support for US soldiers who died in the Korean War for South Koreans be a more appropriate monument to be placed on U.S. soil?

@Ossan 100% WHOLE HEARTEDLY AGREE. Of all the statues that you want to put up on US soil it is THAT ONE? Should be one of the many, many, many Americans who lost their lives fighting for your country. Not a person who was serving the enemy of the USA at the time.

1 ( +11 / -10 )

sandiegoluvMAY. 31, 2014 - 09:28PM JST

I should add, Japan has apologised numerous times. Has that information like the extreme amount of money that Japan paid South Korea so long ago something that they did not hear about until 2006 as well? Without that money and technology that Japan passed on to South Korea, it would not be in its current financial situation. This idea of never forgetting is only damaging relations between the two countries. Those people who did those terrible things are mostly LONG GONE and the only thing that this is doing is promoting a dislike in the US of Japanese people over an issue that ended more than 70 years ago and it is ruining relations between the two countries. WE can not leave in peace with a belligerent country that only wishes to vilify its neighbours for financial means. The South Koreans need to be attacking their own president, of whose father was the very same man that agreed to the terms that were laid out and denied the South Korean women financial compensation from the willing Japanese government at the time. It is THIER fault.

For others with this tired, ill-informed view:

It's not about past 'payments' or 'apologies' per se, it's about NOW; Japan's movement towards revisionism and denial RIGHT NOW.

-5 ( +7 / -12 )

sandiegoluvMAY. 31, 2014 - 09:34PM JST Wouldn't Korean-American support for US soldiers who died in the Korean War for South Koreans be a more appropriate monument to be placed on U.S. soil? @Ossan 100% WHOLE HEARTEDLY AGREE. Of all the statues that you want to put up on US soil it is THAT ONE? Should be one of the many, many, many Americans who lost their lives fighting for your country. Not a person who was serving the enemy of the USA at the time.

Already is one:

It's called the Korean War Veterans Memorial and it's 2.20 acres and get's 3 million visitors a year. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_War_Veterans_Memorial

So see no harm in a small modest memorial to the victims of Korean sex slaves for Japanese soldiers, do you?

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

For others with this tired, ill-informed view:

It's not about past 'payments' or 'apologies' per se, it's about NOW; Japan's movement towards revisionism and denial RIGHT NOW.

Ah, I see we are now going to get snarky with THE FACTS? Ill-informed view? Not ill-informed at all. Check the facts, Please. There have been numerous apologies by Prime Ministers throughout the years.

There has been a constant call from the Korean public (and to some extent, Japanese with left or liberal political leaning) that Japan should compensate Korean individuals who suffered from Japanese colonial rule. The Japanese government has refused to do so, arguing that it settled issues on a government-to-government basis under the 1965 agreement.

However, in January 2005, the South Korean government disclosed 1,200 pages of diplomatic documents that recorded the proceeding of the treaty. The documents, kept secret for 40 years, recorded that the Japanese government actually proposed to the Korean government to directly compensate individual victims but it was the South Korean government which insisted that it would handle individual compensation to its citizens and then received the whole amount of grants on behalf of the victims.

The Korean government demanded a total of 364 million dollars in compensation for the 1.03 million Koreans conscripted into the workforce and the military during the colonial period, at a rate of 200 dollars per survivor, 1,650 dollars per death and 2,000 dollars per injured person. South Korea agreed to demand no further compensation, either at the government or individual level, after receiving $800 million in grants and soft loans from Japan as compensation for its 1910–45 colonial rule in the treaty. None of that money was ever paid back as well.

However, the South Korean government used most of the grants for economic development, failing to provide adequate compensation to victims by paying only 300,000 won per death in compensating victims of forced labor between 1975 and 1977. Instead, the government spent most of the money establishing social infrastructures, founding POSCO, building Gyeongbu Expressway and the Soyang Dam with the technology transfer from Japanese companies. This investment was named Miracle on the Han River in South Korea.

As the result of this revelation, there have been growing calls for the Korean government to compensate the victims. A survey conducted shortly after the disclosure showed that more than 70 percent of Korean people believe the South Korean government should bear responsibility to pay for those victims (ibid.). The South Korean government announced that it will establish a team to deal with the appeals for compensation, although "It has been the government's position that compensation for losses during the Japanese occupation has already been settled.

As for revisionism, that is due to China's actions. Also, I think the Japanese public has a right to put their fingers in their ears. This issue has been going on since I got here and long before as well.

4 ( +14 / -10 )

"Meh. Next, I'd like to see the Vietnamese American community erect a statue beside it to commemorate the thousands of innocent Vietnamese civilians butchered by Korean soldiers during the Vietnam war." Whoever you are I just want to point out to you that Americans also killed innocent Korean and Vietnamese civilians in both Korean War and Vietnam War respectively! So stop blaming Korea at once and look at yourself and your own flaws before you seek to arguments! Get this fact straight! Korean President Kim Dae Jung offered apology to Vietnam for Korean soldiers acts.SO CASE CLOSED! Don't bring this issue up ever again!!

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

Iowa should too.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

@Kaynide: You forgot two famous places. Quantico and Arlington National Cemetery,

It has been hosting a various national organization meetings. I am sure many visitors will notice this comfort woman issues.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Again, this liar Kan Il Chul makes fuss about her dementure story. She was sold by her own mum into prostitution and nothing else.

False Accuzations of Comfort Women http://www.howitzer.jp/korea/page03.html

4 ( +9 / -5 )

"Wouldn't Korean-American support for US soldiers who died in the Korean War for South Koreans be a more appropriate monument to be placed on U.S. soil?" I know you hate S Koreans so much but at least it's a good thing that not ALL Americans think like you do about Koreans.Your statement in quotes are fairly obvious.There is a Korean War Vet Memorial in Washington DC if you haven't been there yet.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

@Michael, yes he did apologise. ONCE. ONCE. Did not take much responsibility after that though. Nor near as much as the South Koreans wants the Japanese to do today. Yes, Americans killed innocent Koreans and Vietnamese as well. Nobody is denying that nor is it part of the discussion. But South Koreans must look at the facts. And what do you mean by case closed? Don't bring this issue up ever again?? It is kind of unfair that you should say that but Japan should continue to apologise. Apologies have been made on 17 separate occasions by Japanese prime ministers. Compensation has been paid. Personally, I think Japan has done a far better job of owning up to history than the USA and South Korea when it comes to compensation and apologies. I got my facts straight. Everybody killed everybody. But South Korea is using this as way to misdirect attention from their own governments incompetence. The president's father is not someone that the current President wants to be tightly linked to and has tried to distance herself from. And for good reason.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Pure idiocy. 'Monument to comfort women dedicated in Virginia'. Why not in Australia or Iceland ?

3 ( +8 / -5 )

The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, in a proclamation, said the monument “will serve as a lasting reminder and an affirmation to the world that all crimes against humanity, such as human trafficking, will not be condoned or tolerated.”

Can't argue with that sentiment. Good on you Fairfax County.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Japan’s embassy in Washington said that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe stood by Tokyo’s “sincere apologies and remorse” for comfort women’s “immeasurable pain and suffering” and did not want the issue to be “politicized.”

It won’t matter much at all: How Japanese nationalists would try to assail or discredit the overdue justice sought in America or in other parts of world against iniquitous atrocities committed by Japanese imperial army.

Why ? it’s because Japanese nationalists have been fighting for a lost cause. In plain English, a lost cause is an act that is deemed to be self-defeating.

The thing is that Abe’s admin fails to see that denying or whitewashing sex slavery issue makes Japan lose moral ground to be a possible leader in Asia. Because of Japan’s stands on its war time crimes, it’s next to impossible for Japan to be viewed as a credible source for international affair. On the same spectrum, German has been doing pretty well; for instance, German is the country which sits with significant fives around the table to negotiate with Iran. Can the world accept Japan's role with its past records to be one of the leaders in the world ? the answer is obvious.

In the eyes of the world, Japanwould be a country which created an economic boom after its defeat in world war II, but now on its way to descend with decaying moral values.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

@Micheal I don't think he hates South Koreans, nor do I. But the facts are that things have been done and South Korea acts like Japan have not done anything at all and is reneging on an agreement that it signed in 1965. That is the problem and why the two countries can't get along. South Korea is trying to brew hatred over a subject that was dealt with a long time ago. That should be the END OF THE STORY and we should punish the South Korean government for not compensating the victims.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Korean President Kim Dae Jung offered apology to Vietnam for Korean soldiers acts.SO CASE CLOSED! Don't bring this issue up ever again!!

An apology is not atonement, but only the first step in the process.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Korean-Americans who support this movement can all give up their US citizenship and go home as far as I am concerned. The Comfort Women they are "memorializing" were military prostitutes that served our enemy in WWII. How they ended up there is not the issue. Would be put up monuments for the women who worked in the wartime brothels run by Nazi Germany as well? Wouldn't Korean-American support for US soldiers who died in the Korean War for South Koreans be a more appropriate monument to be placed on U.S. soil?

Osaan -- Luckily you don't speak for all Americans -- even the majority. First, it is your OPINION that these women were "military prostitutes" and your comment that "how they ended up there is not the issue" is simply your opinion as well. Second, your question about a monument for U.S. soldiers who died in the Korean War is a total red herring. If you had bothered to even take 30 seconds to go to Google, before you wrote your angry rant, you would have learned that there is an official Korean War monument in Washington, DC, as well as some in states like Ohio and New Jersey.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

@letsberealistic - Yes, there is a statue for the American service men who died over there that Americans bought and paid for not South Koreans. I am fully aware of that. But what I was talking about is that this statue was basically one that was done at the insistence of Koreans in the USA. Now, if they wanted to put one up of some Americans losing their lives over there fighting North Korea so that South Korea could be a free country, I could go for that. But this was put up for political purposes supported by a large Korean constituency. It has nothing to do with the USA and its presence is only meant as a slight at the Japanese. If Japanese wanted to put up such a statue in Tokyo I would be thrilled. But to do so in a third country that has nothing to do with it for political gain is just wrong on so many levels. This was meant to pressure the Japanese into paying out more money. Plain and simple. President Park has been going around and asking other countries to do the same thing.

And no I don't think that all Koreans should give up their citizenships.

@Jerseyboy, he is not talking about monuments that the USA put up for its soldiers.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

kaynide

States can have national monuments in them

If not in a state where do you think a national monument could possibly be, in a foreign country? Of course it's in a state but it's not a state monument so he and you are wrong.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Korean-Americans who support this movement can all give up their US citizenship and go home as far as I am concerned.

If you are American, you certainly have the right to make un-American statements such as that one. These "comfort women" were certainly victims and a community has the right to remember and honor their victims as they deem fit, as long as it does not violate anyone else's legitimate rights.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

@Jerseyboy, he is not talking about monuments that the USA put up for its soldiers.

sandiegoluv -- NO! Ya think? So what? As usual Ossan is blindly ranting to support Japan at the risk of making the same prejudiced conclusions which characterize Japanese diplomacy towards SK. How does he know that these Korean Americans have not contributed to monuments or other causes that pay tribute to American soldiers that died in Korea? Or, for that matter, how does he not know that they may very well have had husbands or sons or daughters or other relatives die in the U.S. military in Korea or elsewhere? No, he is just saying "let's throw them out" because he doesn't like their opinion.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

SidekickMAY. 31, 2014 - 10:22PM JST Pure idiocy. 'Monument to comfort women dedicated in Virginia'. Why not in Australia or Iceland ?

A comfort women monument is being erected in Australia, Sydney this year.

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2014/04/01/japanese-opposition-comfort-women-statue-sydney

And the Japanese are shamefully opposing it so they are going to look even worse in the eyes of Aussies now too.

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

Once again the demonization of Japan continues plot by plot by Korean "Americans" in the United States.

While there is nothing wrong with memorializing past wrongs, there is something definitely wrong in using such past wrongs in order to incite anger and spite against another country, which is what these monuments are all about.

The comfort woman quoted in the article above probably refused the apology and compensation offered by the asian women's fund, and she is absolutely incorrect in her tone about Japan apologizing.

And so the revisionism continues.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

@sidekick: Pure idiocy. 'Monument to comfort women dedicated in Virginia'. Why not in Australia or Iceland ?

'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

Because they don;t live in Australia or Iceland. Why there ??? Don't you know where is VA ?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Well, I am not going to support that type of sentiment at all all against South Koreans in America or any other place, but

Wouldn't Korean-American support for US soldiers who died in the Korean War for South Koreans be a more appropriate monument to be placed on U.S. soil?

That is correct and I completely agree with it and would have like to see, or even one showing their soldiers fighting so bravely in the war. But recently as we all know there are many attempts to change the Sea of Japan to the East Sea in American textbooks which is sponsored by South Koreans. Just another slight at Japan that is being done on a world wide basis. President Park asking other countries to erect statues to the comfort women. Her arrogant attitude toward PM Abe trying to break the ice with her by speaking her own language. It is all very obvious when you look at the whole picture and not just one thing.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

@jerseyboy Osaan -- Luckily you don't speak for all Americans -- even the majority. First, it is your OPINION that these women were "military prostitutes" and your comment that "how they ended up there is not the issue" is simply your opinion as well. Second, your question about a monument for U.S. soldiers who died in the Korean War is a total red herring. If you had bothered to even take 30 seconds to go to Google, before you wrote your angry rant, you would have learned that there is an official Korean War monument in Washington, DC, as well as some in states like Ohio and New Jersey.

Well said. But you stayed in Japan long enough, do you think that you would be able to reason with Shintaro Ishihara and his followers in Japan or anywhere else?

Many nationalists in nippon are so proud of their country that they prefer to live in denial for the atrocities against mankind. That is sad part of Japan. You might have to come to the terms with that

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

I do not agree with some of the sentiments that HIDING OUT has said but I do agree with the idea that.....

Your ancient grievances are of no interest to anyone other than corrupt politicians who want to buy votes for the very cheap price of a lump of stone in a park somewhere. This action runs totally counter to the NA culture of immigration and assimilation.

Especially the last part. It runs counter to immigration and assimilation. One ethnic group should not have to walk by a statue that depicts its people in such a horrible light. It should not be singled out as the villain and that is what I see South Koreans doing with these statues around the world. Just trying to shame the Japanese.

I am done with this conversation. I wish all peace, love and happiness. But these kinds of statues will not provide that at all. Night all.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Is it just me or is this a black eye for the Japanese political cronies that keep attempting to downplay and deny the plight of this 200,000 women throughout Asia? It's quite ironic that, this week Japan announced to review their formal apology for this atrocity, but the US is acknowledging it. Man up Japan! You are disgracing yourself!

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

shouldn't they put this statue in south korea ??

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Sandiegluv: "Frankly I hope the statue gets taken down."

It won't, and in fact with attitudes like your own there will be more put up, and more, and more, until people like yourself stop claiming that throwing money at the problem, then giving a half-hearted apology, then demanding the victims shut up, and while supporting a government full of people that deny it happened, you have zero right to be sick of anything but attitudes and comments like those you express.

Ossan: Ummm... duh... there are monuments commemorating Korean soldiers and Americans who died in the Korean war. Just because you want to blame everything under the sun on South Korea and call the women prostitutes is no excuse to ignore the very, very obvious facts.

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

They've got Korean monuments now in big countries like China and the USA. Must be comforting.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

hidingout: "...The only black eyes here are the ones being sported by ROK activists who are so weak minded and full of hate..."

That's where I stopped reading your comment, confirming it is 100% hypocrisy, and unfounded at that. Perhaps you ought to stop hating so much when trying to talk of what you perceive as hate. You going to stop hidingout, go back home, and insist people not be allowed immigration rights if they don't agree with the denial of history?

Once again, the only one tarnishing the image of the US or its customs is you, my friend. The people who put up the stature are more American than you are, clearly.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

sandiegoluvMAY. 31, 2014 - 11:33PM JST I do not agree with some of the sentiments that HIDING OUT has said but I do agree with the idea that..... Your ancient grievances are of no interest to anyone other than corrupt politicians who want to buy votes for the very cheap price of a lump of stone in a park somewhere. This action runs totally counter to the NA culture of immigration and assimilation. Especially the last part. It runs counter to immigration and assimilation. One ethnic group should not have to walk by a statue that depicts its people in such a horrible light. It should not be singled out as the villain and that is what I see South Koreans doing with these statues around the world. Just trying to shame the Japanese. I am done with this conversation. I wish all peace, love and happiness. But these kinds of statues will not provide that at all. Night all.

Honestly, what are Japanese like yourself afraid of? Exposing to the world the truth that Japan, like many other countries (Australia, UK, US, China, Korea) was guilty of acts of great inhumanity? I know that saving face is important to Asian cultures like Japan, but it should never be at the expense of presenting the truth, no matter how painful.

We keep hearing how 'hateful' these Korean-Americans are for wanting to erect a monument to their young women who suffered during the war. Where is the hate in that? It sound more like defensiveness and fear of truth.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

I love Japan. I love the people and the culture. It feels comfortable to me. I loved the years I lived there. Yes, Japan did some horrible stuff during the war. But how long are people going to hold on to the grudge? I'm native American. I'm not pissed off by the many crimes that were committed against us. I wasn't there and it was a long time ago. My best friend is a black man. He doesn't sit around bitching about slavery. Let it go. It's over, apologies were tendered. What else is supposed to be done?

One thing I know surely. If you hang on to history, you get stuck and can never move forward. Forgiveness opens a lot of doors that otherwise remain closed.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

“The Japanese government should make a prompt apology for the comfort woman issue,” Kang said.

Japan apologized to comfort women in 1993 and set up a fund to compensate survivors.

Welp...um...'kay... :

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

@bonestructure LOL that's like saying Jewish people(Those who weren't alive during the holocaust) should forget the Holocaust just because they weren't there. Do you expect these people to forget about this event when Japanese politicians and high ranking officials constantly deny its existence?

@sandiegoluv

They are NOT trying to shame regular Japanese people at all. They are just trying to raise awareness, and put an end to Japanese politicians' constant denial regarding this incident. That's like saying Jewish people are trying to shame German people because they are raising Holocaust memorial monuments/museums around the world.

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

So stupid! The US has nothing to do with this dispute and should put up memorials relevant to their own history and not to that of third Partys. What is next --- a memorial in Seoul about the US-Mexican war? How about putting the shoe on the other foot?

4 ( +7 / -3 )

@Toshiko: Respectfully, I said "I could go on" but would rather have not. My point being that it should be easy for anyone to find countless other things in Va. There's lots going on there!

@OldSanno

If not in a state where do you think a national monument could possibly be, in a foreign country? Of course it's in a state but it's not a state monument so he and you are wrong.

Then what on earth are you talking about with this:

Virginia has at least two such monuments: Richmond Slavery Reconciliation Statue and the Booker T. Washington national monument

Virginia is a state, not a nation.

All of that being a response to:

A cursory Google search does not indicate that Virginia - a former slave state and home to Robert E. Lee - has any monument dedicated to those it enslaved for hundreds of years. Just a thought.

I think everyone's point was that Virginia, within its borders, has lots of monuments and history. It has monuments dedicated to slavery, both State and Fed. Obviously those particular ones above were done with Virginia's approval and therefore, in/part of Virginia.

Are you nitpicking the semantics of "having" monuments, as in owning them and not physically having them within her borders?

Specifically Non-Fed, Richmond has an entire walking tour called the Slavery Trail with several monuments, buildings and info-plaques to memorialize slavery.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Kudos to Fairfax County!

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Once again the demonization of Japan continues plot by plot by Korean "Americans" in the United States.

The issue is simple. People who can't properly atone for wrongs fall far short of the mark of being honorable or decent. It is clear that Japan has not yet properly atoned for its past. Atonement for this can't be judged as "adequate" in the eyes of the Japanese; it must be judged so by their victims.

If Japan had properly atoned, there would be no need for this monument as it is today. If Japan had properly atoned, which it has not, it would be a shame for the Koreans to act in this way.

For an example, keep in mind that a German leader went in front of the Israeli Knesset to apologize on behalf of all the German people for the Holocaust. And that simply marks the beginning of atonement. Are the Japanese up to that level of righteous conduct? Only time will tell, and it will be those whom the Japanese hate or have hated in the past who will provide them with that opportunity to develop as more fully decent humans. This is vastly different from demonization.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Seriously no one in the U.S knows or really cares about comfort women. The thing is, this is in a part of Virginia where the majority of people are Korean Americans. So the state goes with what the people want, and erects a statue. I think it's great to spread your cultural influence, but using the U.S as political means to get your point across or make Americans more aware isn't going to make us hate Japan. If that is where this going. No need to open up old wounds that took place more than 70 years ago.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Seriously no one in the U.S knows or really cares about comfort women.

The more Americans become aware of the history, the more will care.

The Koreans are actually doing Americans a service in this area, as there a great many things that we must atone for as well. Actually, if the Japanese would properly atone, they would be doing the world a great service by their example.

Proper atonement is actually painful and serves to strengthen the resolve never to commit such acts in the future.

And so the world must wait, and the monuments to the victims must continue to be built as reminders.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

jerseyboyMay. 31, 2014 - 10:52PM JST

Osaan -- Luckily you don't speak for all Americans -- even the majority. First, it is your OPINION that these women >were "military prostitutes"

"A "comfort girl" is nothing more than a prostitute or "professional camp follower" attached to the Japanese Army for the benefit of the soldiers. The word "comfort girl" is peculiar to the Japanese." http://www.exordio.com/1939-1945/codex/Documentos/report-49-USA-orig.html

Yes MY opinion and that of the United States Army.

and your comment that "how they ended up there is not the issue" is simply your opinion as well.

That's not an opinion. That's a fact which is at the core of the "Comfort Women" debate,

Second, your question about a monument for U.S. soldiers who died in the Korean War is a total red herring. If you >had bothered to even take 30 seconds to go to Google, before you wrote your angry rant, you would have learned >that there is an official Korean War monument in Washington, DC, as well as some in states like Ohio and New Jersey.

How many of those were put up by Korean-American organizations?

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Every people, of every race and Nation need to build monuments towards slavery of some other persons or groups. Every people of every race or Nation is guilty of some sort of slavery towards the 'conquered' people somewhere in history. The Japanese Government apologized already. The Japanese Government and People have done more for Korea by helping rebuild their Nation after their own 'Civil War' especially in the forms of education and technical assistance. Samsung electronics, Kia-Hyundai automobiles, how they resembled Japanese products so closely is not an aberration. Nor are the television dramas and music styles, copied from Japan. Seems it's a small group of extortionist and history revisionist that keep cutting open old wounds, perpetrated and made by people are and have been long since dead! How long much the children of the perpetrators prostrate and pay before Korea and China, are happy!?? It will be far more beneficial to all of Asia to embrace one another as cousins in the 21st Century because there is a far more sinister and deadly cancer that is ready and willing to eradicate all of your history, culture and customs in a heartbeat!

1 ( +5 / -4 )

@smithinjapan

It won't, and in fact with attitudes like your own there will be more put up, and more, and more, until people like yourself stop claiming that throwing money at the problem, then giving a half-hearted apology, then demanding the victims shut up, and while supporting a government full of people that deny it happened, you have zero right to be sick of anything but attitudes and comments like those you express.

You are right on few points. Most likely it won't get taken down and more and more of them will be put up and that is simply because the Koreans refuse to let it go. The Chinese and the Koreans are the only ones who are still sticking to an issue that is more than 70 years old, while everyone else has moved on in the interest of peace. Ummm, last time I checked they were asking for apologies. Maybe you should look at some of those apologies. Many of them do not sound half hearted at all.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_war_apology_statements_issued_by_Japan

Last time I checked they were asking for money as well. TNEY RECEIVED THAT A LONG TIME AGO UNDER THEIR OWN CONDITIONS AND NOW ACT LIKE THEY DIDNT. The Korean government demanded a total of 364 million dollars in compensation for the 1.03 million Koreans conscripted into the workforce and the military during the colonial period, at a rate of 200 dollars per survivor, 1,650 dollars per death and 2,000 dollars per injured person. South Korea agreed to demand no further compensation, either at the government or individual level, after receiving $800 million in grants and soft loans from Japan as compensation for its 1910–45 colonial rule in the treaty. THAT WAS THE TREATY!!!!! They signed it. End of story. Other countries even accepted money from the Asian Women's fund.

¥565m ($4.7m) was raised in donations from the Japanese people, and given to 285 comfort women from Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines, each of whom received about 2m yen ($16,700) ¥770m ($6.5m) in taxpayers' money was provided to pay for medical fees for these women, and for 79 other women from the Netherlands ¥370 million ($3.1m) was spent building medical facilities and old peoples' homes in Indonesia, rather than compensating individuals there, and the rest was used for the fund's running costs and other smaller projects.

Nobody is asking the victims to shut up. The problems is that you have a lot of Japan haters and opportunists trying to do anything they can for political and financial gain. I don't deny it happened. Most Japanese do not deny it happened. A few nuts in certain places do and last time I checked there were nuts like that in every country including my United States. Does that mean everyone feels that way? No. But what is happening is that people in Japan are getting tired of the protests and the animosity over something that happened more than 70 years ago, and I do have a right to be sick of it because I am tired of hearing about it. I have been here a very long time and have seen this issue used for political and financial gain at the expense of Japanese people who do not deny it happened, feel it was horrible but are becoming more and more tired of apologising and dealing with an irate neighbour who refuses to let the past be the past and move on with things.

@letsberealistic

Honestly, what are Japanese like yourself afraid of? Exposing to the world the truth that Japan, like many other countries (Australia, UK, US, China, Korea) was guilty of acts of great inhumanity? I know that saving face is important to Asian cultures like Japan, but it should never be at the expense of presenting the truth, no matter how painful.

We keep hearing how 'hateful' these Korean-Americans are for wanting to erect a monument to their young women who suffered during the war. Where is the hate in that? It sound more like defensiveness and fear of truth.

First of all I am American, not Japanese. Second of all I am well-seasoned veteran on this issue and have been on both sides of this issue. Every country is guilty of doing horrible things in the past. The UK conquered most of the world. The Spanish and Portuguese counquered all of South America and so on. I don't feel any need to sweep anything under the rug. I agree that history books in Japan gloss over the past and need to be fixed. But same with my history books in the USA and many other countries. The only country that correctly teaches history that I can see is Germany. To that, I would love to see a comfort women statue put up in Tokyo. I don't want the Japanese to run from their past. But it is a little hypocritical to ask them to be the only ones to confront their past when we don't at all. I believe Japan needs to confront its past and might do so, if Japan haters would chill out just a bit. It is difficult to be apologetic when every screams murderer and rapist for 70 years even after agreements have been made to let things go.

Also, if they wanted those statues to be put up for their women, I could agree to that. 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 70 years ago. But this is just a recent event and it has political and financial gains written all over it.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

@smithinjapan

It won't, and in fact with attitudes like your own there will be more put up, and more, and more, until people like yourself stop claiming that throwing money at the problem, then giving a half-hearted apology, then demanding the victims shut up, and while supporting a government full of people that deny it happened, you have zero right to be sick of anything but attitudes and comments like those you express.

You are right on few points. Most likely it won't get taken down and more and more of them will be put up and that is simply because the Koreans refuse to let it go. The Chinese and the Koreans are the only ones who are still sticking to an issue that is more than 70 years old, while everyone else has moved on in the interest of peace. Ummm, last time I checked they were asking for apologies. Maybe you should look at some of those apologies. Many of them do not sound half hearted at all.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_war_apology_statements_issued_by_Japan

Last time I checked they were asking for money as well. TNEY RECEIVED THAT A LONG TIME AGO UNDER THEIR OWN CONDITIONS AND NOW ACT LIKE THEY DIDNT. The Korean government demanded a total of 364 million dollars in compensation for the 1.03 million Koreans conscripted into the workforce and the military during the colonial period, at a rate of 200 dollars per survivor, 1,650 dollars per death and 2,000 dollars per injured person. South Korea agreed to demand no further compensation, either at the government or individual level, after receiving $800 million in grants and soft loans from Japan as compensation for its 1910–45 colonial rule in the treaty. THAT WAS THE TREATY!!!!! They signed it. End of story. Other countries even accepted money from the Asian Women's fund.

¥565m ($4.7m) was raised in donations from the Japanese people, and given to 285 comfort women from Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines, each of whom received about 2m yen ($16,700) ¥770m ($6.5m) in taxpayers' money was provided to pay for medical fees for these women, and for 79 other women from the Netherlands ¥370 million ($3.1m) was spent building medical facilities and old peoples' homes in Indonesia, rather than compensating individuals there, and the rest was used for the fund's running costs and other smaller projects.

Nobody is asking the victims to shut up. The problems is that you have a lot of Japan haters and opportunists trying to do anything they can for political and financial gain. I don't deny it happened. Most Japanese do not deny it happened. A few nuts in certain places do and last time I checked there were nuts like that in every country including my United States. Does that mean everyone feels that way? No. But what is happening is that people in Japan are getting tired of the protests and the animosity over something that happened more than 70 years ago, and I do have a right to be sick of it because I am tired of hearing about it. I have been here a very long time and have seen this issue used for political and financial gain at the expense of Japanese people who do not deny it happened, feel it was horrible but are becoming more and more tired of apologising and dealing with an irate neighbour who refuses to let the past be the past and move on with things.

@letsberealistic

Honestly, what are Japanese like yourself afraid of? Exposing to the world the truth that Japan, like many other countries (Australia, UK, US, China, Korea) was guilty of acts of great inhumanity? I know that saving face is important to Asian cultures like Japan, but it should never be at the expense of presenting the truth, no matter how painful.

We keep hearing how 'hateful' these Korean-Americans are for wanting to erect a monument to their young women who suffered during the war. Where is the hate in that? It sound more like defensiveness and fear of truth.

First of all I am American, not Japanese. Second of all I am well-seasoned veteran on this issue and have been on both sides of this issue. Every country is guilty of doing horrible things in the past. The UK conquered most of the world. The Spanish and Portuguese counquered all of South America and so on. I don't feel any need to sweep anything under the rug. I agree that history books in Japan gloss over the past and need to be fixed. But same with my history books in the USA and many other countries. The only country that correctly teaches history that I can see is Germany. To that, I would love to see a comfort women statue put up in Tokyo. I don't want the Japanese to run from their past. But it is a little hypocritical to ask them to be the only ones to confront their past when we don't at all. I believe Japan needs to confront its past and might do so, if Japan haters would chill out just a bit. It is difficult to be apologetic when every screams murderer and rapist for 70 years even after agreements have been made to let things go.

Also, if they wanted those statues to be put up for their women, I could agree to that. 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 70 years ago. But this is just a recent event and it has political and financial gains written all over it.

@bpsitrep - AMEN!!! Everything you said is 100% correct. What I don't get is the Japan-haters who so hypocritically forget that their countries are guilty of horrible atrocities as well, but somehow they use Japan as a whipping post.

Answer this Japan bashers!

Which past colonist country besides Germany has apologised for its past more than Japan? Which country besides Germany has paid more money than Japan to its victims? Which country besides America and Germany have statues put up dedicated to the victims of its past? Which country besides Germany does not white-wash its history textbooks? Which country besides Germany regularly admits to its horrible past?
3 ( +5 / -2 )

But what is happening is that people in Japan are getting tired of the protests and the animosity over something that happened more than 70 years ago, and I do have a right to be sick of it because I am tired of hearing about it. I have been here a very long time and have seen this issue used for political and financial gain at the expense of Japanese people who do not deny it happened, feel it was horrible but are becoming more and more tired of apologising and dealing with an irate neighbour who refuses to let the past be the past and move on with things.

sandiegoluv -- really? then how come the Japanese government is "re-examining" the comfort women issue? You see that "sick and tired" argument cuts both ways. And until the Japanese right gives up on its quest to put things in a better light, the Koreans have every right to state their case as well.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

So let me get this straight. Japan supposedly admitted the crime, paid money and apologized, but is now angry that people would erect monuments dedicated to remembrance of the victims? Am I to take it that if one gives an apology and pays money, we are just supposed to forget about the victims or that the crime ever happened?

Excuse me, but no one truly sorry for what they did would ever take such a position. Only one not at all sorry would do that. In fact, only one not at all sorry would even consider "reviewing" a previous apology.

So sorry all ye Japanese nationalists and everyday misogynists, but we are not falling for it.

And BTW, since some of you don't understand. You cannot buy a teenage girl, even from her own parents, then consider it fair and square to force her into unpaid prostitution. Its still sexual slavery and rape, because if the girl does not want it, she does not want it, no matter how much cash you gave her parents. It boggles the mind the utter garbage some people are allowed to post here while much more innocent statements I have seen deleted.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

@jerseyboy.

The Japanese government was re-examining the issue of the comfort women for two reasons. 1. A lot of those so called women were not forced into prostitution as so many who know about this issue have been able to ascertain. It might have been an attempt to lesson the case of a sense of responsibility for the issue and that is truly a shame. 2. There has been so much attention focused on this issue that Tokyo needed to re-examine it to see if there was anything new the might lend more credence to the comfort women's issue as well.

I have no idea why you feel it cuts both ways. It does not. What is happening is that YOU and a lot of other westerners who most likely have a surface knowledge of the issue see a victim and scream foul without doing too much research into the subject. Furthermore, seems to be that since your moniker is "jersey boy" you come from either New Jersey or somewhere in England. Well, whichever country you are from are you going to tell me that WE have spent ANY TIME at all apologising to the victims of our countries actions? Seriously? How can YOU tell these people to apologise for anything and look down your nose at them? Seriously Japan has apologised on numerous occasions. How many times has ours? It does white wash its history textbooks? So does ours. As the bible says, "Take the log out of your own eye before you take the speck out of your brothers". We westerners are being seriously hypocritical in throwing Japan under the bus while we ignore our own history and the victims of it.

I would like to take back what I said about the statue. I don't want it taken down actually. I believe that we need more statues like it. But they must be built by the right people for the right reasons. If the Japanese were to erect such a statue I would be overjoyed. The fact of the matter is that the USA is a melting pot and I do believe that this is the first time our country has had a statue put up by one ethnic group to shame another one. That is wrong.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Mr. G:

" So let me get this straight. Japan supposedly admitted the crime, paid money and apologized, but is now angry that people would erect monuments dedicated to remembrance of the victims? "

In unrelated third countries, yes. The word is full of things that deserve memorials. Put a memorial for Armenian genocide (which was exponentially more horrible than any of this) in a park in Seoul, and then lecture others about wanting to export your national issue.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

WilliB

In unrelated third countries, yes. The word is full of things that deserve memorials. Put a memorial for Armenian genocide (which was exponentially more horrible than any of this) in a park in Seoul, and then lecture others about wanting to export your national issue.

You mean like memorials for Hiroshima atomic bombing in countries like Britain and New Zealand which who also be third party countries for that event?

If the people of Virginia want a memorial for whatever historical event then its their concern only and not the business of anyone else.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Mr. GJ UN. 01, 2014 - 09:56AM JST So let me get this straight. Japan supposedly admitted the crime, paid money and apologized, but is now angry that people would erect monuments dedicated to remembrance of the victims? Am I to take it that if one gives an apology and pays money, we are just supposed to forget about the victims or that the crime ever happened?

Unfortunately that's usually the case for bigots to sprout hate speech under the guise of free speech. What the right wingers fail to understand is this comfort women issue has been quickly dealt with and covered, as a result it has never been made aware of in global scale as Hiroshima and Nagasaki Bombing. In fact every atrocities US committed over the years are documented meticulously, even average joe knows more about that event than what triggered the world war 2. Comfort women issues are scattered at best and nothing is concrete. No one is sure how many countries were involved and how many are victims from my observation. Even though it is terrible violation against human right, retribution funds will fix everything. They seem to never quite get it's more about awareness than anything the reason this issue keeps arising.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

zichi:

" You mean like memorials for Hiroshima atomic bombing in countries like Britain and New Zealand which who also be third party countries for that event? "

Yes, those two. Although in case of the Hiroshima things, the issue is usually phrased broader, about nuclear weapons in general, so I guess a case can be made that that is different. But I wish this Hiroshima victim business would stop too. Note, by the way, that Nagasaki does not trumpet itself in the same way... much more classy.

" If the people of Virginia want a memorial for whatever historical event then its their concern only and not the business of anyone else. "

Did "the people of Virginia" want this, or a group of fanatical Koreans?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

sandieglove:

First, you said no one is saying all the women were prostitutes, but here's Ossan again:

"A "comfort girl" is nothing more than a prostitute or "professional camp follower" attached to the Japanese Army for the benefit of the soldiers."

"The Chinese and the Koreans are the only ones who are still sticking to an issue that is more than 70 years old, while everyone else has moved on in the interest of peace."

Really? So, the Jews should shut up already about the Holocaust, and the Japanese -- why the heck are they still holding ceremonies on the anniversaries of the atomic bombings and asking American dignitaries to be present? Come on! That happened way back when! It IS amusing though that you demand China and Korea forget Japanese atrocities but at the same time ask (and then are given proof) for apologies by other nations for atrocities even way further back in the past!

"The fact of the matter is that the USA is a melting pot and I do believe that this is the first time our country has had a statue put up by one ethnic group to shame another one. That is wrong."

The 'fact of the matter' is that it was approved by the American government, same as the statue of cranes trapped in barbed-wire commemorating Japanese troops who fell in WWII -- and you seem to be incredibly defensive and forgetful of such facts when it suits you. It's not like some Koreans flew to Virginia and erected the statue illegally, is it? So was it the 'ethnic group' who put it up? or the government? and if so, why are you so against it?

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

On, my now that is funny. I never said that I am against these women. Or that anyone should shut up, but reality is that the government is using this for its own political purposes. Complain if you want to, but don't let it interfere with building a good relationship between the two countries. Their overzealous attitude is a huge impediment to peace between the two countries. That is undeniable. As I have stated and which you continue to completely ignore, just like the South Koreans and the Chinese. Apologies have been given. Money has been paid and was not given to the victims, nor admitted by the South Korean government until 2005. You keep conveniently ignoring this issue, just like the South Koreans. That is sad. You seem intelligent, but you attack Japan with a purpose and ignore the facts.

Answer this for me please.

An agreement was made stating that neither government nor private citizens would ever request money from the Japanese ever again. Why is THAT not good enough? Their government agreed to that. Their president refused compensation to the victims at the time. WHY IS THIS FACT CONVENIENTLY IGNORED BY YOU AND THEM?

More apologies have been given to the South Koreans. Many heartfelt apologies. Why are those all denied. Did you read the apologies that I listed? I am betting NO!

The statues in Virginia were pushed by South Koreans in Virginia with a sense of purpose. To push an issue that America has nothing to do with just to give Japan a black eye. The statue that is dedicated to the Japanese-Americans who died in WW II is a tribute to those men who fought for America and is not a negative symbol of Japan, because they were Japanese fighting for OUR country.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

So the Koreans have taken over Virginia and Japanese over Hawaii. Which state would you rather go to?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Mr. GJun. 01, 2014 - 09:56AM JST

So let me get this straight. Japan supposedly admitted the crime, paid money and apologized, but is now angry that people would erect monuments dedicated to remembrance of the victims?

In your analogy, the criminal got upset because the self claimed victims began claiming way more than the criminal actually committed and admitted. The self claimed victims are so happy to create new atrocities every day for, by doing so, they can get more sympathy and possibly more money in addition to making the criminal look worse than he actually is.

The onlookers are not interested in verifying the allegations and are so lazy to believe in whatever the self claimed victims say. Other than small exception, the self claimed victims do not show any evidence, saying all the evidence was destroyed by the criminal.

Let’s hope God does justice someday and let lies be known lies. Let’s hope people give a fair look at allegations.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

In your analogy, the criminal got upset because the self claimed victims began claiming way more than the criminal actually committed and admitted. The self claimed victims are so happy to create new atrocities every day...

What this indicates is the tactics of a criminal still at work trying to victimize others through its own feeling of superiority to the victims. This much is crystal clear. The tactics and language are so obvious to the outside observer.

Genuine atonement -- where a criminal comes into full realization of the weight of his crimes -- has been something Japan has avoided.

the criminal look worse than he actually is.

The criminal always wants to look better in his own eyes, in order to save face. The criminal who becomes more fully human and wants to genuinely atone for past crimes, will want to start to look at himself through the eyes of his victims. Japan, as a nation, has never been able to bring itself to that point, with regard to the Koreans, and perhaps others.

Japan is not alone in this. But she certainly does not deserve any praise for the attitude of so many of her people.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

yabitsJun. 02, 2014 - 09:12PM JST

Admitting what did not happen is not a genuine atonement.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Admitting what did not happen is not a genuine atonement.

When one commits crimes or wrongs against another on a routine basis, one must expect accusations which might seem at first to be false. Some might indeed be exaggerations.

But the criminal does not have, and should not have, the luxury of sorting these out as long as the attitude is one of stubborn denial of the crimes in general. The process of genuine atonement would, in fact, do much of the sorting. And, by avoiding atonement, Japan has allowed this whole situation to fester. By not allowing the world to forget a crime un-atoned for, the Koreans are acting justly in this matter.

Actually, many Japanese would be open to seeking proper atonement, much to their credit. But they would be fiercely opposed by the very same spirit of those who committed the crimes. It is no shame to seek to atone. Quite the opposite. It is a serious shame to satisfy one's self that one is completely innocent in the light of serious wrongs done to others.

Sometimes emotions will cause victims to get details wrong. But to use that against them is utterly shameful.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

yabitsJun. 02, 2014 - 10:30PM JST

Some might indeed be exaggerations.

"Exaggeration" is a too nice word. Perjury is a crime of its won.

But the criminal does not have, and should not have, the luxury of sorting these out as long as the attitude is one of stubborn denial of the crimes in general.

Never heard of. Is there any legal precedent of that? At least in Japan, there is no such disadvatage for suspects who deny their charges.

Isn't it so strange that a suspect is allowed to sort out fatcs from lies only after he admits everything including all the false accusation?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Never heard of. Is there any legal precedent of that?

The "guidelines" for proper atonement are over 3,600 years old and can be found in the books that provide much of the foundation of many laws of the nations of the world, as well as guidelines for righteous character. Certainly Korea has been influenced to a great extent by them in their contact with the West over time. This is no accident.

The Korean people who are setting up these monuments are actually making it possible for Japan, as a nation, to receive tremendous benefits. Japan's example would provide leadership to the entire world. Only arrogance, denial and self-centeredness can keep the health of Japan's national character on its current downward spiral.

Isn't it so strange that a suspect is allowed to sort out fatcs from lies only after he admits everything including all the false accusation?

That is not how it works. The world was witness to the wrongs committed by Japan and its military. The nations of Asia did not invite the Japanese military to come over and brutally occupy them. The wrongs started with that. But no time in all of the years since the war's end, has Japan as a nation sincerely sought out to make proper atonement in a manner that the Koreans they have wronged perceive it. That is the only reason these issues keep festering.

The "suspect" must first honestly seek to atone. The accused must adopt a humble spirit that accepts they have indeed done wrong things, without necessarily knowing all of the specifics. The "sorting out" is a process that the accusers (and their witnesses) and accused go through together. Only individuals and nations seeking righteous character could dare to undertake this process. A people have to take full responsibility for the actions of their former leaders as well as all those who were serving them.

There are very strict rules about false accusations too. But the spirit of overall self-exoneration that many in Japan's leadership have adopted in light of the grievous wrongs of its military past -- an attitude which I see reappearing today -- leads one to feel concerned that Japan will eventually doom itself to repeat its mistakes.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Great posts, sandiegoluv. Point is, Koreans can't and won't move on from the past while other countries have. They'll continue to hang on to events from 70 years ago and use that as a victim card. That's why Koreans and Korean culture will never ever be taken seriously. They'll just be seen as whiny, insecure people who are trying hard to show how they're better than the Japanese. Kinda sad if you think about it.

"Meh. Next, I'd like to see the Vietnamese American community erect a statue beside it to commemorate the thousands of innocent Vietnamese civilians butchered by Korean soldiers during the Vietnam war."

Ding ding ding! Now this I'd want to see. Or maybe Korean Americans can see to this happening? Maybe when hell freezes over.

So stop blaming Korea at once and look at yourself and your own flaws before you seek to arguments! Get this fact straight! Korean President Kim Dae Jung offered apology to Vietnam for Korean soldiers acts.SO CASE CLOSED! Don't bring this issue up ever again!!

What is it with Koreans and their supporters that can't stand when the shoe is on the other foot? I noticed that Koreans can't stand being criticized and instead get defensive. This is why their culture and people remain underdeveloped--there is no self-criticism and improvement. Then again, insecurity and a massive inferiority complex will do that a culture. And oh, I'm sure people won't mention the atrocities of Koreans soldiers in Vietnam again simply because you told them not to, Shim. Maybe you need to stop watching those cliched, sappy Korean dramas as you're getting too emotional.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

No need to have this in Virginia. It was not a US. It was not (minimal) US involvement. Not as many Koreans in US in the war years. Just a contemporary pacifier for recent immigrants.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

yabitsJun. 03, 2014 - 01:58AM JST

The "suspect" must first honestly seek to atone.

So, you do not know presumed innocence. I find it hard to communicate with you since you do not seem to have common values of democratic world. Can you tell me why?

The "guidelines" for proper atonement are over 3,600 years old

What are they? "Code of Hammurabi" around 1750 BC?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

What are they? "Code of Hammurabi" around 1750 BC?

The Torah. The code which cites loving one's neighbor as one's self.

So, you do not know presumed innocence.

Once more than two witnesses bear testimony, innocence can no longer be presumed, but is cast in doubt.. The world knows of the crimes committed against women forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese military. The world has witnessed representatives of Japan make some concise apologies on some issues regarding the war and rather vague ones on other issues. I have seen no evidence of a direct apology to the women who were forced as sexual slaves.

Nevertheless, in 1993, the government of Japan finally admitted that its military had operated brothels. There isn't much innocence to presume in a party that takes 50 years to finally admit to what was demonstrated over decades by overwhelming evidence. The stories of the women involved reveal horrendous treatment. And Japan has refused to take full responsibility, or to offer a specific, unambiguous apology..

I find it hard to communicate with you since you do not seem to have common values of democratic world. Can you tell me why?

It is not a democratic value, in my view, to establish and manage brothels for soldiers and to trick, coerce, or otherwise force women to provide their bodies as sexual slaves. To do that, and then to try to obfuscate and deny what others, including Japanese, have personally witnessed is not a "value" I have anything in common with. The memorial erected by these women is not based upon a lie.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

yabitsJun. 03, 2014 - 01:14PM JST

The Torah.

Thank you so much, but we live in a world where freedom of religion is guaranteed to people. I am happy to take arms to protect that freedom.

Once more than two witnesses bear testimony, innocence can no longer be presumed, but is cast in doubt.

I am happy to disagree with that rule as long as I live in this country.

Nevertheless, in 1993, the government of Japan finally admitted that its military had operated brothels.

Prostitution was legal in this country. Everyone knew Japanese military licensed brothels in the occupied territories. It is strange to say "Japan finally admitted," when Japan openly admitted prostitution from day1.

It is not a democratic value, in my view, to establish and manage brothels for soldiers and to trick, coerce, or otherwise force women to provide their bodies as sexual slaves.

Prostitution is legal in most of the European countries even now. The question is if they were tricked, coercesd or otherwise forced. That question should be addressed.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

First of all it is important to keep this in mind: For a person whose background has been influenced by Torah, they have a duty to inform their neighbor when their neighbor has committed a seriously wrongful act. Not to do so would give the neighbor no opportunity to reflect and atone, and would cause the withdrawal of divine protection for both parties. In that sense, the Korean people who are creating these monuments are acting out of a high moral purpose, whether they are fully aware of that nor not.

Everyone knew Japanese military licensed brothels in the occupied territories. It is strange to say "Japan finally admitted," when Japan openly admitted prostitution from day1.

Until the 1990s, Japan’s government denied that the military operated brothels. This is part of an all-too-common pattern of denial. In 1992, the historian, Yoshimi Yoshiaki discovered incriminating documents in the archives of Japan’s Defense Agency indicating that the military was directly involved in running the brothels. So, what everyone knew, Japan’s government, until 1993, kept denying. There no honor in that. Once a witness's continual testimony can't be relied upon, their credibility decreases to a very low level.

Prostitution was legal in Japan.

You are centering the foundation of your argument on legalities. However, the issue is one fraught with more serious moral and spiritual dimensions – dimensions which provide the foundation for our legal systems.

Just because prostitution was legal in Japan, did that make it right and proper to impose it on the areas that Japan invaded with its military?

The question is if they were tricked, coercesd or otherwise forced.

The "wrongful party" should not be the one in sole determination of the questions to be asked. Nevertheless...

In listening to the stories of the women, one has to consider the “market forces” at work, as well as the situation that the Japanese created when they occupied countries with their military. By market forces, I mean the simple laws of supply and demand, and the question of how relatively few women could provide sexual comfort to so many men, also raises important moral and legal questions.

The nature of prostitution in wartime almost necessarily involves force on a day-to-day basis. Many of the comfort women claim to having been “gang-raped.” Is it possible for a woman who has been recruited for service as a comfort woman to be forced to provide her body even when she has reached a point where she no longer feels able to? Would the Japanese military people managing the place allow her to rest, if there were additional soldiers waiting to take comfort?

The women say they were terribly abused. Simple math, with the Japanese moral attitude seeming that “prostitution of women is OK” leads me to the conclusion that their stories are FAR more credible than those of the legalistic deniers among the Japanese. If the brothels were legally run, and run properly, the duty is on the Japanese to prove that they were.

I think everyone knows they were run in a way that seriously abused the women.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I live about 10 miles from where this monument was unveiled. (Yawn). A small memorial designed to placate the Korean-American population in Fairfax. In the grand scheme of things it amounts to nothing much. The U.S. isn't likely to change any policies because of this memorial.

If the Korean population REALLY wants to put up a memorial regarding human trafficking, perhaps they need one in their backyard memorializing all the daughters they sold to brothels for pocket money.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

yabitsJun. 04, 2014 - 02:54AM JST

Until the 1990s, Japan’s government denied that the military operated brothels.

When did Japanese government deny that? No, it did not. There is no statement or anything that Japanese government denied iansho.

News media love "new finding" to sell more paper. You have to be cautious and verify by yourself. If you insist that Japanese government denied before 1900s, just find when it did. This is my good neighbor advice.

You are centering the foundation of your argument on legalities. However, the issue is one fraught with more serious moral and spiritual dimensions

That is why Japanese government apologized. Prostitution was legal, but in hind sight, prostitution is degradation of women and so it apologized. There is no move in Japanese politics including PM Abe, that is planning to change the apology for prostitution. What Abe wants to verify is if Korean ianfu were abducted by Japanese military.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

When did Japanese government deny that? No, it did not. There is no statement or anything that Japanese government denied iansho.

I do not know if you are purposely trying not to grasp a simple fact. To do so would be a demonstration of perfidy. Perhaps you are not being cautious enough.

In June of 1990, the Japanese government denied that the military operated brothels by stating that all of the brothels were operated by private contractors. It took the discovery by Yoshimi to get them to finally stop denying and admit the military complicity in operating the brothels. Until 1993, there was no admission that the Japanese military operated brothels. Only the logical equivalent of denials.

Prostitution was legal, but in hind sight, prostitution is degradation of women and so it apologized.

Prostitution is all that, but forcing a woman to take on many more men than what might be considered an "average" number for a prostitute amounts to the crime of torture or rape, regardless if prostitution itself is "legal." The credibility of the women's stories of being gang-raped by Japanese military men is raised substantially when compared with the ludicrous assertion that Japan's 1990 declaration that the brothels were all privately operated is not equal to a denial of military involvement.

A failure to properly atone puts Japan in a very bad and shameful position.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

yabitsJun. 04, 2014 - 11:19AM JST

In June of 1990, the Japanese government denied that the military operated brothels

I doubt. The closest thing I could find was the Q&A session at the budget committee of the Upper House on June 6, 1990.

082: Were ianfu conscripted?

083: With respect to conscription based on the National Mobilization Act, the conscription work has no bearing to the job of ianfu. Retired officials are also of the opinion that conscription did not relate to ianfu.

084: The facts about ianfu may be buried in the darkness. I think the government should investigate the facts. The government can do that, cannot it?

085: As to ianfu, speaking from the storries of retired officials and others, the situation is such like private contracters are moving with the ianfu, or somewhat similar situations, and it is, frankly speaking, hard to investigate and make a conclusion of the true situations.

I do not think the government denied anything. yabits, where did you get that information?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Here we go round 1345 now coming from Virginia. People are silly and swallowing it hook, line and sink on this "hate Japan blitz" by Koreans (and Chinese). As plain as day.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

One of the highest number petitions:

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/remove-offensive-state-glendale-ca-public-park/3zLr8dZh

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I was pleased to read about the memorial to comfort women in Glendale, CA. Perhaps there will be "Round 1346" as long as the issue of responsibility remains ambiguous and unresolved.

084: The facts about ianfu may be buried in the darkness...085: As to ianfu, speaking from the storries of retired officials and others, the situation is such like private contracters are moving with the ianfu, or somewhat similar situations, and it is, frankly speaking, hard to investigate and make a conclusion of the true situations.

The Glendale memorial has a young woman sitting in a chair, with an empty chair next to her. I believe people can deplore what happened to them and remember them without hating Japan. I personally believe their stories about horrendous abuse at having to service so many soldiers. I don't believe that it is "buried in darkness" that many were gang-raped. Finding the exact perpetrators may be impossible, but the men who did that were representing the military and people of Japan. That much is certain.

It was Japan who first created and then abused these comfort women. Why should they mind if the women's fellow nationals remember them? We have a national museum to the Jewish holocaust in our nation's capital.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

So glad I left VA, not safe for my black/JP fam and I at all.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

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