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Most big Japanese cities prepared to give multilingual disaster info

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It's 2020 and they are only just now 'prepared' for multilingual services? I'm quite sure that, if Japan was not awarded the 2020 Olympics, nothing would have changed at all.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Oh Thank you, so nice.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Very impressive, good for them being so proactive in helping foreigners.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Hyogo have been providing disaster info by email alerts for some years

1 ( +1 / -0 )

A large majority.

I wonder if there was ever a Small Majority.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I wonder if there was ever a Small Majority.

51% = Small majority

1 ( +1 / -0 )

That's good of them.

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That they are doing it is good, that it is not already in place in all areas 20 years after the 95 earthquake is indicative of a sclerotic bureaucracy. The question remains whether those “planning” to will actually achieve anything, how effective the implementation and how user friendly the end product is?

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That they are doing it is good, that it is not already in place in all areas 20 years after the 95 earthquake is indicative of a sclerotic bureaucracy.

Actually it was 25 years ago next week.

Yeah, holy crap, 1995 was a quarter century ago already!

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I doubt that its going to work. Foreigners are 2nd class people in Japan, or 3rd class if they don't speak/read Japanese.

Let's take a non-disaster yet currently automated example - the delayed Subway train system as an example of how the Foreign support for issues is handled.

In Japan, if you are late for work, and its due to transportation issues, you can generally get a certificate of proof from the transportation provider that there was a delay (it used to be a white piece of paper handed out at your destination station, nowadays its gone online... however...

The English version of the websites for Tokyo Metro delays are really very out of sync with the Japanese ones, up to a couple of hours so.... Which leaves you with (a) if you check the website before entering your station you probably wont know there's a delay, and (b) your Company may accuse you of being tardy...

Another example is the Public Announcements made over loud speakers within each area - these are barely understandable in English ( and often provide useless information, which makes you wonder why they're used in non-Emergencies... Welcome to Japan...)

For other than for Tourists, non-Japanese residents need to think that in a disaster, that they're on their own, and plan accordingly. In reality all those preparation kits, etc wont be to hand, you just have a well known action plan that everyone in your Family can understand based on the situation and hope for the best.

For Tourists - following what others are doing may help. (Though Common-Sense is generally something that should take precedence - sadly something Japanese Peoples as a whole following the Fukushima Earthquake disaster have been labelled as Lacking !! ...i.e. Marshalling School kids in flat land in front of an oncoming Tsunami !!! )

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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