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'Mutant' vegetables wrongly attributed to Fukushima

55 Comments
By Rona Moon

“Attack of the mutant vegetables!! Are these our new tomato overlords?? Let’s all boycott the struggling Fukushima farmers for, oh, say 100 years or so.”

Actually, despite the attention they’re receiving and hits they’re no doubt generating online, the photo at left and others like it don’t seem to originate from Fukushima at all.

The scary veggie pics went viral on the Internet. This is the kind of story that keeps showing up again in different incarnations. It’s just too good a story — I mean, who doesn’t want to see freakish vegetables? People love freakish vegetable pics.

So, where and when were these photos taken? I tracked down this tomato to find out.

For starters, tomato experts tell me that scary-looking tomato is probably a “reisetomate”, a rare breed of tomato which looks like a lot of tomatoes fused together in a distorted, weird way. Big tomatoes are also prone to a disorder called “catfacing”, caused by cool or cloudy weather at blooming time which makes the blossoms stick together. Freakish tomatoes happen all the time -- but because most of us get our tomatoes from the supermarket rather than growing them ourselves, we tend to see only the shapely ones.

The tomato image first appeared on Japanese website TV Asahi, featured along with other funny photos of babies and cats submitted by viewers as a “Deluxe Tomato”. If that was a tomato from Fukushima, I highly doubt that any Fukushima residents would be sending it in as a joke, chuckling as they effectively tell the entire nation, “Look everyone, our produce is totally not safe!”

In fact, it seems that this tomato may have come from Saitama, hundreds of kilometers south of Fukushima.

However, a bunch of questionable websites are trading on this image. One Romanian site claims that this picture was tweeted by @masason, CEO of SoftBank (try as I might, I can’t find this tweet). The same website goes on to ask for donations, to be sent to a bank account in Romania. Also, “monthly donation is very helpful”…

Another website (not to name any names) has some extra information and political commentary on the tomato: “Lori Mochizuki, who edits Fukushima-Diary.com, reports that capitalists in Japan are now selling clearly discernible radiation contaminated and genetically mutated tomatoes. Mr Mochizuki reports that such mutated plants are being increasingly found all over Japan, as the capitalist try to draw our attention elsewhere.”

“Capitalists in Japan have apparently become so bold that they now seek to make money from tomatoes not fit to be eaten by human or animal alike, as their achon confederates in America and elsewhere seek to cover up their negligent response to the on-going and worsening Fukushima crisis.”

A few lonely voices of reason tried to debunk these images, but they were far outnumbered by the hysterical reaction of most of the internet.

Well, most folks are irrationally scared of radiation. Sure, it’s scary. Still, can we be rational about this? We have devices for measuring it. The vegetables and rice produced in Fukushima are tested for radiation and meet even higher standards than the rest of Japan. But for fear of the name “Fukushima”, people won’t buy these perfect and radiation-free vegetables, even when they were grown over 100km away from Fukushima Daiichi (did you know that Fukushima is actually Japan’s third-largest prefecture? It’s a big place!). Hard-working farmers suffer the consequences of these harmful rumours far more than they should.

As I write this article, a correction has been made to the English-language article that hosted the images — apparently “these images aren’t related to the Fukushima disaster”. But in the meantime, Fukushima has taken another senseless knock to its economy.

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- Tomato Juice Fad Dead at 6 months -- Who Makes the Better McDonald’s Burger; France or Japan? -- Blogger’s Troubling Insight into Psyche of Post-Disaster Fukushima Residents

© RocketNews24

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55 Comments
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Yes indeed, this link to photos of misshapen vegetables has been doing the rounds on FB. As ever, people take things at face value, and don't question the source. What a waste of time.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

A few lonely voices of reason tried to debunk these images, but they were far outnumbered by the hysterical reaction of most of the internet.

Haha, too true, as is the paragraph which follows.

Well, most folks are irrationally scared of radiation. Sure, it's scary. Still, can we be rational about this? We have devices for measuring it. The vegetables and rice produced in Fukushima are tested for radiation and meet even higher standards than the rest of Japan. But for fear of the name "Fukushima", people won't buy these perfect and radiation-free vegetables, even when they were grown over 100km away from Fukushima Daiichi (did you know that Fukushima is actually Japan's third-largest prefecture? It's a big place!). Hard-working farmers suffer the consequences of these harmful rumours far more than they should.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Well, most folks are irrationally scared of radiation

There is a good reason for this, especially when the Govt irrationally says the radiation levels are safe, or maybe just outright lie. I even knew a nuclear engineer who said that he believed a little radiation is good for you. Some times there is nothing wrong with being what others say is irrationally scared.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

@scooby

I have heard the same argument many, many times myself. A little radiation a day, will help keep the doctor away. Ignorance is such a bliss.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

Don't care if the pictures originate from Fukushima or not..I wouldn't knowingly touch any source of food from the Tohoku region anyway..And yes I do go out of my way to make sure of it!!

-9 ( +6 / -15 )

Nice "research" taken from the reddit post a week ago.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Don't care if the pictures originate from Fukushima or not..I wouldn't knowingly touch any source of food from the Tohoku region anyway..And yes I do go out of my way to make sure of it!!

Tohoku, bad. Me, good.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

If someone can provide evidence about "little radiation is good for you", then please educate me.

As far as I know, radiation for the whole species over an evolutionary time period is good as it may accelerates and increase chance of advantageous mutations. We humans as a species has gone through that process countless times and had gained many advantageous mutations. Today, our body is so complex, so interdependent that a single random mutation will mostly mess up that balance.

Many Japanese friends are not afraid of Fukushima's produce, most don't trust the system and would rather avoid taking the risks. Especially when it involves taking risks for the future of their children.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

nothing about afraid or panic, the fallout from the 3 explosions went all over Tokyo, and as evident radioactivity did increase (although not beyond safe levels yet ), it is very logical to assume that there are pockets of high radiation all over the north as noted and reluctantly admitted already by Tepco... not really sure what's the point of this story. Since most measured data indicate extremely high radioactivity around the plant and in groundwater ( probably China Syndrome in full blow ) there is absolutely no reason to trust the produce from that surrounding area.

Btw, the radioactivity tests are voluntary , farmers keep trying to sell their damaged produce by mislabelling it ( normal practice in Japan - even big firms were caught red-handed ) ,in all honesty the area should be closed as Chernobyl and farmers compensated and forcibly removed and forbidden to produce anything under criminal consequence.

That is no panic, just the way such disasters should handled, responsibly and efficiently.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Finding fake Fukushima vegetables has absolutely no connection to whether or not Fukushima vegies are safe.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Well, most folks are irrationally scared of radiation. Sure, it’s scary. Still, can we be rational about this? We have devices for measuring it. The vegetables and rice produced in Fukushima are tested for radiation and meet even higher standards than the rest of Japan.

I understand where you are coming from, but have you actually lived in Fukushima or nearby? It is a totally different story us who live near Fukushima and then read factual stories about how the government does nothing about companies selling Fukushima products under a different name. We have lost trust in the government a long time ago since 3/11, so why do you expect us to believe every time they say "oh the radiation is low enough to be edible" etc?

I am against fear-mongering, but also against ignorant bliss.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

In relation to adult males, children and infants are said to be three to ten times weak in terms of radioactivity. Eating Fukushima vegetables is very dangerous. It is recommended you buy vegetables harvested in Western Japan, Shikoku and Kyushu.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I found the same type of photo of each vegetable, from countries all over the world. Just Google 'clustered tomatoes' or 'double peaches' and you can see tons of the same kind of photo. These things happen naturally. We're too far removed from our food sources to know it.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

And I thought the mutants were the round and completely red tomatoes that they sell in supermarkets. A good tasty natural tomato is misshapen and not red all over.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Fukushima Diary has posted many, many photos of supposedly "mutant" plants, fish, and insects, and nearly all of them have been sourced to places outside of Japan and/or prior to 3/11, and are often naturally occuring phenomena. Even when this is proven beyond any doubt Fukushima Diary refuses to retract any of its misses, and insted deletes the comments of people pointing out the inaccuracy.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

farmers keep trying to sell their damaged produce by mislabelling it ( normal practice in Japan - even big firms were caught red-handed

I've heard this twice now on here in the last few weeks. All I'm asking for is link to a story of your claim please.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Fukushima Diary has posted many, many photos of supposedly "mutant" plants, fish, and insects, and nearly all of them have been sourced to places outside of Japan and/or prior to 3/11, and are often naturally occuring phenomena. Even when this is proven beyond any doubt Fukushima Diary refuses to retract any of its misses, and insted deletes the comments of people pointing out the inaccuracy.

Hence why when I read Fukushima Diary I always take their stories with a grain of salt. But that can be said for most news sites. But I would agree that FD does exaggerate A LOT more than other sites.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

FizzBit, why wait...just Google "Fukushima mislabel" and read away!

It's always this way. This isn't a nuclear issue, it's just what humans do. There is a standard level of funny-business in any sector or business. Look at China. Look at US meat industry and big agra and big pharma, the self-reporting, self-regulating and revolving-door compliance. Remember mad cow testing and mislabeling, remember the scandal about HIV testing on donated blood. Or how about finance/banking sector, where once again the stakeholders are in charge of their own compliance and reporting and the players get a free pass? Baseball and soccer and sumo matches fixed? Illegal political contributions?

This kind of crap is normal and par for the course down through history, every era, every country. It's amazing how many people get as far as realizing the tooth fairy and Santa Claus don't exist, then just stop there.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I've heard this twice now on here in the last few weeks. All I'm asking for is link to a story of your claim please.

Well, as for that, just google mislabeling and Japan, and you'll find a long history of things, starting long before Fukushima, and continuing. If you don't find it, you're not looking very hard. Maybe try Fukushima and Japan and mislabeling and you'll see a bunch.

http://japandailypress.com/butcher-arrested-for-selling-fukushima-beef-after-mislabeling-it-282795/

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

FizzBit, just re-read my comment...sorry I didn't mean to try to slam you! Apologies.

I'm also constantly amazed at the way things work. It's to anyone's credit to believe in good and give the benefit of the doubt! Things can never change without that kind of strength and viewpoint.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

From Saitama? Well, this certainly doesn't help calm the nerves in terms of radiation fear, considering that Saitama was is well known to have been directly affected by the radioactive plumes carried by the wind from Fukushima all the way past Nagano. All it does is reinforce that somebody is lying to us about the real radioactive state of the country.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

100km away from Fukushima Daiichi

100 kms is nothing, Fukushima sent irradiated materials all over the country and even further. That picture might not be from Fukushima, fine that is in not a justification of food safety over there. Common sense tells You do not grow vegetable in the area of a triple meltdown with all the leaks of "whatever god knows carcinogen isotopes " released from TEPCO nuclear plant in a daily base 24/24 since 2 years.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

From Saitama? Well, this certainly doesn't help calm the nerves in terms of radiation fear, considering that Saitama was is well known to have been directly affected by the radioactive plumes carried by the wind from Fukushima all the way past Nagano. All it does is reinforce that somebody is lying to us about the real radioactive state of the country.

Did you read the article? That tomato's form has nothing to do with any radiation of any sort whatsoever.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@badmigraine

No problem, my friends back home give me much more shit than that in fantasy football league. Lol

Thanks for the tips guys. I guess I shouldn't expect links when others here post serious claims. I know of a few stories but have not heard of this occurring on a large scale. My conspiracy theory is that the stolen watermelons aren't being stolen, but purposely taken to be sold outside the prefecture. Lol

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If someone can provide evidence about "little radiation is good for you", then please educate me.

Life on this planet has been flourishing for millions of years while continually being exposed to low-level radiation. If it was bad for you, you'd think that us complex life forms would have died out long ago - before there was even civilizations.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Don't care if the pictures originate from Fukushima or not..I wouldn't knowingly touch any source of food from the Tohoku region anyway..And yes I do go out of my way to make sure of it!!

Two and a half years later and people are still linking all of Tohoku with Fukushima. With that attitude, the region doesn't have a chance.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

'If someone can provide evidence about "little radiation is good for you", then please educate me.'

I think the reasoning goes something like this. Start with the opposite proposition that any radiation is bad for you. If that were the case, then we would expect to see variations in cancer rates correlating to levels of background radiation. I.e. places with high background rates would have higher cancer rates. I understand that this is not the case (although I think evidence is inconclusive either way). Therefore it's reasonable to suppose that low levels of radiation may have benefits. For example, radiation kills cancerous as well as healthy cells, and if cancerous cells were more prone to be being destroyed than healthy cells, then there would be a level of radiation that might be better than none at all.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Heda_Madness - which chance are you talking about, do you even understand the scale of the nuclear accident ongoing there? It is much much more than Chernobyl today. That region is done and should be closed off for the next 30 years.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Well, most folks are irrationally scared of radiation.

Actually, radiation is known to be quite dangerous, particularly if one has ingested radioactive materials in say, I don't know, FOOD.

Sure, it’s scary.

Its more than scary. Its dangerous.

Still, can we be rational about this? We have devices for measuring it.

The only way to effectively measure it in food is using a scintillator. They are supremely expensive and require expertise to use. And not all food is checked, but only samples.

The vegetables and rice produced in Fukushima are tested for radiation and meet even higher standards than the rest of Japan.

Right. Because there have never been any errors with food or food labeling in Japan, so we should rest assured. Further, they raised the bar on what is "safe" immediately after the meltdowns, not only with what is in the food itself, but also on what fields are legally acceptable to grow from.

And you know who I am truly concerned for? Its not myself. Its the kids who will truly bear the brunt of all this.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Its not myself. Its the kids who will truly bear the brunt of all this.

Looking at the apathy of people, the impunity of TEPCO executives and the massive support for LDP with the agenda to re-open nuclear plants, I think the Japanese society does not care of what is happening or going to happen to their children over there and in general in the future, they have already been sacrificed so the elite can continue to prosper.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

First of all, to say 'It is much much more than Chernobyl today' highlights your lack of understanding of what happened in Chernobyl.

Secondly, Fukushima is part of Tohoku. The region around Dai Ichi is a small part of Tohoku. Tohoku consists of Akita, Aomori, Iwate, Miyagi, Yamagat and Fukushima. So yes, I am going to get upset when people continue to make false claims which will have a potentially harmful impact on areas that have not been effected by the Fukushima disaster.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Life on this planet has been flourishing for millions of years while continually being exposed to low-level radiation.

You people do make confusion between the impact of a few microsieverts of ionizing radiation on your skin and eating carcinogen isotope like Strontium90 (and alike) in a daily base from your diet.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Totally agree that the meme above is a hoax, but ....

"The vegetables and rice produced in Fukushima are tested for radiation."

And you are aware that the testing is voluntary? And that positive results can lead to an entire community's produce getting pulled, so the pressure is clearly on the testers to pass as much as they can.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Heda_Madness it is your lack of understanding I am totally amazed at, btw I grew up near Chernobyl and know very very well what has happened there and how exactly it was contained, go read some before you talk.

The most important points are : 1.Chernobyl initially released large radioactive plume, and explosion. The government put all their efforts in containing it at expense of workers and military, made sure nothing more is released beyond the initial, prosecuted everyone related as a deterrent and restricted access to a huge area.

2.Fukushima , it is unknown how much radiation was released in the plume following 2 explosions, they have reported that they keep finding highly radioactive debris in surrounding area, only 2 explosions are reported and 1 left out totally. The radiation is released constantly since the disaster with no to minimal containment and all those reactors have restarted criticality (thats why boric acid is poured ) , in water and pressure releases - groundwater in the area is contaminated by the admission as well as sea . Access not restricted and there is minimal food control. Most radioactive measurements or statistics are being actively falsified or not reported until they no longer keep it under wraps.

So yes, Fukushima is on a much larger scale....

Now, since there is no exact measurement or decent reporting from government or tepco - they shot themselves in the foot ... if you dont have exact data its just easier to assume the whole Tohoku is contaminated.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

It is easy to scare people with irrational fears. That is the reason for witches, monsters, flying saucers, conspiracies, end-of-the-world stories, predictions of doom, etc. Some people like being scared, it is the reason horror and disaster movies are so popular. It also sells papers, the media know that and it is the reason they play up stories like these. Rational or not, it doesn't matter. Lots of people believe this sort of guff because they want to believe it.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I've seen stuff like this before with no "radiation" involvement and some of it can be cultured by mechanical manipulation. Adding too much irrigation at the wrong time will result in some really horrible looking, but edible, tomatoes, for example. Now, if you want to get some actual radiation exposure, keep on smoking those cigarettes. For some unknown reason, tobacco accumulates traces of polonium which is radioactive. It might be a radon daughter isotope.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Arguably the most important part is that in Chernobyl they took a long time to evacuate the local population and continued to sell milk products and broadleaved vegetables. But hey, I've only got an environmental geography degree to back me up, not first hand living near there expertise. To say that there is minimal food control and to say that it's worse than Chernobyl where the Soviet Government systematically allowed the poisoning of it's citizens is nonsensical.

May I suggest you read something about Chernobyl. I read quite a few books on it during my degree.

its just easier to assume the whole Tohoku is contaminated.

Easier. Lazier. Grossly incorrect. But still.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

There is again no real control on contaminated produce , farmers are back at planting rice even within the 20km zone.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

The whole of Tohoku is not contaminated. Please refrain from posting rubbish like this.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@bfg4987 Yes, I read the article. I also googled for images of the said 'reisetomate' mentioned in the article. While there are similarities, the one in this picture looks a little different. The one in the photo here appears to be also growing its own stalks, which is inconsistent with other reisetomate photos. While it IS possible that this is a reisetomate, who's to say it isn't in fact a mutant tomato from radioactive areas? As with all radioactive issues, why take unnecessary risk? As the old adage goes, better safe, than sorry.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Within the 20km. Within the no go.

Ludicrous.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"There is again no real control on contaminated produce, farmers are back at planting rice even within the 20km zone."

Really? Sorry, but I'm calling BS on that one.

My inlaws got back in to the 20 km zone this spring, to fix up the graves and check on the original family home. Nobody is farming.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

here you go Taj http://rt.com/news/fukushima-rice-plant-evacuation-506/

0 ( +1 / -1 )

if you dont have exact data its just easier to assume the whole Tohoku is contaminated.

Operative words are "if you don't have exact data". Here is some general data:

http://uhohjapan2.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/radiation-map-tohoku-prof-hayakawa2.jpg

See the arrows going over Sendai, Yamagata and Iwate? When asked who I trust about where the plumes went, TEPCO and the government are tied at dead last.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

From the inception of the disaster much radiation was released,the data on how much is still being were withheld;this allowed residents to head towards and not away from the releases-this is a fact.After 3/11 contaminated debris,earth and straw were carted around Japan as sufficient checks were not in place-this is a fact. In Kansai (I can't speak for other locations) after 3/11 the cheapest vegetables in the shop were from Fukushima-this is a fact. As to the spread of radiation please Google Kashiwa for high levels of radiation far from Fukushima.

To say that the whole planet was not irradiated is incorrect! To what level and what is detrimental to health is debatable.

The following days after 3/11 saw radiation monitors triggered-the panic that ensued in Korea caused schools to close. Of course, this was not reported on NHK.

Foreign staff in Taiwan from a UK company returned home forcing a medical facility to close due to measurable radioactive discharge from Fukushima not covered by insurance.

All this from a considerable time ago in addition to the present chaos with rising temperatures shows that a cold shutdown is still very much a myth.......

1 ( +2 / -1 )

the pictures i have seen on the internet were peaches not tomatoes. the fruit may seem to be scary but how about the fish. The fishing industry is really scared and I would be to. I wonder just how far that contamination really has flowed.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Jerome_from_UtahJul. 23, 2013 - 02:20PM JST

I've seen stuff like this before with no "radiation" involvement and some of it can be cultured by mechanical manipulation. Adding too much irrigation at the wrong time will result in some really horrible looking, but edible, tomatoes, for example. Now, if you want to get some actual radiation exposure, keep on smoking those cigarettes. For some unknown reason, tobacco accumulates traces of polonium which is radioactive. It might be a radon daughter isotope.

You can easily get deformed vegetables by just not having the right kind or not enough nutrients in the soil, or even growing them too close together as well as too much irrigation at the wrong time, it has nothing to do with radiation.

Actually, we are exposed to small amounts of radiation every day from radon gas which varies according to the place, and from cosmic rays over which we have no control over, and it is found in trace amounts in everything we eat or drink. We are also exposed to relatively higher amounts of radiation when we get an X-Ray, a CT scan or a mammogram. It the 1950's people wore wrist watches with luminous dials, which were slightly radioactive, and shoe stores routinely x-rayed people's feet when they were fitted for shoes. Just like anything else there is a "safe" level for radiation. There is no more radiation in tobacco than any other plant; that is just a scare story in the ongoing anti-smoking campaign. Trace amounts of radiation are found in everything, and those trace amounts are negligible.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Trace amounts of radiation are found in everything, and those trace amounts are negligible.

But depending on what you are ingesting, those amounts can build up. Let me just assure you that there are many things spewing out of Fukushima that are not found in nature and have not been for hundreds of millions of years. Our bodies have not evolved in a way to deal with them for that reason. The effects of Strontium 90, cobolt 60, iodine 131 and others is not pretty, and there are no "safe" amounts for internal purposes. All your statements about external radiation sources don't mean anything when you skip right over the materials themselves and their location with regard to the human body and the exposure times. Internal constant exposure from a radioactive material which has lodged in your thyroid gland is a completely different ball game to a split second x-ray.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Any kind of radiation can "build up," radiation lives on for thousands of years, which means that it stays with you forever. The amounts we are exposed to are extremely small, when they say "trace amounts" that means they can just detect a trace of it, a very small amount. A "trace amount" won't hurt anybody, if it did human life would have been extinct when they conducted all the nuclear bomb tests in the 1950's and 1960's, Best to limit the exposure to radiation as much as possible whether it is x-rays or CT scans (small amounts of radiation are also used in treating cancer). But the food from Fukashima is constantly tested and nobody is likely to be harmed by eating it if it deemed safe

Nothing scares people nowadays as much as perceived threats from radiation, it is the new bogeyman. And the media just loves doom-and-gloom scare stories, disaster stories doomsday stories. There is a certain type of person who just eats that sort of stuff up and loves to believe those stories. Facts, logic, reason and common sense goes out the window wherever radiation is concerned. There are no facts or statistics in these type of stories. Even though this particular article states that the pictures do not come from Fukashima at all and have no relation to any "nuclear disaster" people automatically believe that it does, because that is what they want to believe.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

A realist, for once, there are 2 types of radiation and no what comes from the nuclear plant and whats coming from nature aint the same. secondly the danger is exposure not to radiation but to strontium ,cobolt, iodine and cesium which are NOT naturally present in nature. and third nothing is tested coming of there, did you ever see any results of such testing, the process of testing food for presence and levels of those is very complicated and its unlikely performed anything more than a quick pass with a Geiger meter.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

and third nothing is tested coming of there,

Again. Ludicrous.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Heda u seem to like the word.. any proof though?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

You mean apart from the times that they've banned food? Or the one day that drinking water was at a level that was too high for children (based on Japanese standards not international). Or the food that is STILL banned.

There are plenty of cases where Japan has banned the sale of food because of the contamination levels. You on the other hand make wild accusations - they don't test food, all of Tohoku is contaminated etc

And that is why it's ludicrous.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

A Realist

A "trace amount" won't hurt anybody, if it did human life would have been extinct when they conducted all the nuclear bomb tests in the 1950's and 1960's,

Good God man... you have no idea what the crap you're talking about. Ionizing radiation does harm the DNA, and like you said accumulated radiation does build up in your body, and statistically, even if it's a very small amount, it could lead to cancer.

And "human life would have been extinct", the hell? Radiation is NOT contagious, it does not spread from one person to another.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

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