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Nearly 60% say gov't should provide multilingual info: survey

13 Comments

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That is right. at least, They should be issued in english.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

It would be much better to get timely, accurate information through the correct platforms in Japenese only then useless, incomplete , belated info in any other language. If the English is as bad as the NHK news, we will be drowning while trying to decipher what was said

3 ( +6 / -3 )

I question why this is even an issue or question. Clearly we have a gov't that had not entered a world stage, even with olympics, a goal of 40 million annual tourists, a request for foreign labor, etc. I ask, what do these people think about the world? They're hurting big time and don't see how vulnerable they are. This is a serious problem.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Japanese and English should be compulsory. In Wales they have Welsh and English. There is no way I can read or pronounce Welsh!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Having written any form in English would lead to the situation where the recipients would not be able to decipher it...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Judging from previous government info in English, it would probably just sow confusion.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I agree, more multilingual languages should be adopted.

To those who want to whine about learning the language and how multiculturalism negatively affects countries, get with the times. We are an international world.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@oldman_13

I agree, more multilingual languages should be adopted.

To those who want to whine about learning the language and how multiculturalism negatively affects countries, get with the times. We are an international world.

I think so too. In the nordic country where I come from, official services and information (like the tax agency, job agency, banks, post office, etc.) are pretty much always offered at least in our own language, neighbouring languages and English. And from a request, you can often get at least some info on pamphlets also in e.g. Chinese and Russian.

Offering services and important information in several languages just makes things smoother and easier for everyone. Not just the person needing the service, but also to the staff and relevant authorities. Saves time, effort and also money in the long run.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I’m imagining myriad possibilities for simple English:

Soon wind blow. No go roof.

Earth shaking. Stay under table.

Volcano go boom. Kiss behind goodbye.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

To those who want to whine about learning the language and how multiculturalism negatively affects countries,

You have a strawman in your head if you think people concerned with multiculturalism are particularly worried about things like multilingual support for natural disasters or tourism.

get with the times. We are an international world.

Nothing about modernity or internationalism necessitates multi-culturalism. Nor is it in any way inevitable.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I’m imagining myriad possibilities for simple English:

Soon wind blow. No go roof.

Earth shaking. Stay under table.

Volcano go boom. Kiss behind goodbye.

That's still more legible and makes more sense than information my Kuyakusho puts out.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I recommend using やさしい日本語 or plain Japanese as a solution to communication issues. A critical reform advice: Furigana to kanji should be reinstalled to ordinary Japanese texts. It used to be common in major Japanese media outlets. To date most have disappeared, except some being attached to difficult, unfamiliar kanji words to read. By doing so, not merely foreigners but also young native Japanese can fast and efficiently develop kanji vocabulary.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Japan still has a very long way to go in joining the rest of the world in terms being multicultural .

Sadly even the private sector is not doing much either, foods and almost all daily consumption products labels does NOT show any other language, and when they do it's printed in FONT size 5 or 6 and you need a magnifying glasses to read it.

AEON is a classic example of how Japanese companies feel about non Japanese, in most cases they print a half a$$ title at the very bottom of the package in English font size 4 or 5.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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