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New Tokyo restaurant charges higher prices to foreign tourists than Japanese locals

143 Comments
By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

Tamatebako is a new restaurant that opened last month in Tokyo’s Shibuya neighborhood, not far from the internationally famous Shibuya scramble intersection. Tamatebako is a seafood restaurant, and rather than a la carte orders, the place operates as an all-you-can-eat buffet, with some 60 different types of seafood to dish up and enjoy.

As such, the pricing is simple, with a flat fee for the all-you-can-eat-and-drink plan. As you might expect, that price varies depending on the time of day, with weekdays and lunchtime being less expensive than nights and weekends. What you might not expect, though, is that Tamatebako’s prices are also dependent on where you’re coming to the restaurant from with locals being charged less, and foreign tourists charged more.

Here’s how Tamatebako’s prices break down:

● Weekday lunch

5,478 yen (U.S.$36) for Japanese/Japan resident customers

6,578 yen for foreign travelers

● Monday-Thursday dinner

6,578 yen for Japanese/Japan resident customers

7,678 yen for foreign travelers

● Weekend/holiday lunch

6,578 yen for Japanese/Japan resident customers

7,678 yen for foreign travelers

● Friday/weekend/holiday dinner

7,678 yen for Japanese/Japan resident customers

8,778 yen for foreign travelers

▼ Tamatebako can be seen at the point queued up in this video.

At the same time, the weak yen is putting a pinch on the spending power of people who live in Japan and get paid in yen. Hardly a week goes by without a restaurant, food maker, or manufacturer of some other daily necessity like toilet paper or detergent announcing that they’re raising prices, often with the increased in-yen cost of imported ingredients/raw materials cited as the justification. However, with Japan having been a near-zero-inflation economy for so long, the concept of regular cost-of-living increases to employee wages is nonexistent.

It’s against this backdrop that Tamatebako’s owner, Shogo Yonemitsu, came to the decision to structure the restaurant’s prices with two tiers, one for locals and one for foreign tourists. “I realize that not everyone will be in support of the idea [of different prices],” Yonemitsu says, and acknowledges that it may not be something that larger, chain restaurants can implement, but says that for a smaller enterprise like Tamatebako, it’s something he felt they should do.

It’s worth noting the exact wording of the restaurant’s pricing policy. First, between the higher for-foreigners and lower for-locals prices, the higher one is the official price, with the lower presented as a “discount.” Second, the discounted price is available for “Japanese people and Japan residents,” so Japanese nationality/ethnicity isn’t a requirement, although it would seem that if you’re a Japanese national who’s moved overseas and has come back to Japan to visit, you’re still eligible for the cheaper price.

While not unheard of in less prosperous Asian nations, charging higher prices to foreigners generally isn’t something that’s been done in Japan. Tamatebako’s goal appears to be to strike a balance between reaping the higher profits posed by the inbound tourism boom without pricing out local residents, so that it’ll still have a customer base if/when the boom dies down, and it comes on the heels of the governor of Osaka Prefecture floating the idea of a special foreign tourist tax.

Incidentally, Tamatebako is named after the tamatebako from Japanese folktale Urashima Taro, about a fisherman who travels to the underwater palace of the Sea Dragon. Within the story, the tamatebako is a jeweled box that Taro receives upon leaving the palace, with a warning to never open it. When he eventually does give into the temptation and open it, things don’t go well, partially paralleling the Pandora’s box myth. It’ll be interesting to see if the Tamatebako restaurant’s dual-price system works out better for them.

Restaurant information

Tamatebako / 玉手箱

Address: Tokyo-to, Shibuya-ku, Udagawacho 33-12 J+R Building Side R basement level 1

東京都渋谷区宇田川町33-12 J+RビルサイドR B1

Open 11:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m.

Website

Source: TBS News Dig, Tamatebako, Gurunavi

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- Beware the rise of overpriced “Inbound Don” at tourist spots in Japan

-- Japanese prefectural governor wants foreign tourists to pay special extra fee

-- Huge price hike for Japan Rail Pass triggers huge drop in foreign travelers who’ll buy it【Survey】

© SoraNews24

©2024 GPlusMedia Inc.

143 Comments
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 “I realize that not everyone will be in support of the idea [of different prices],” Yonemitsu says

Let's see if the idea does not end up being a huge mistake and the resulting negative publicity makes people avoid the restaurant.

23 ( +41 / -18 )

That also happens in Italy. One price for the locals and another for the visitors.

19 ( +33 / -14 )

The foreign tourists can certainly afford the extra couple of coins. Foreign tourists have more money than Japanese, so this move kind of makes economic sense. I doubt there will be much pushback.

Will other restaurants, bars and shops around Japan follow suit?

-30 ( +18 / -48 )

Fighto!Today  04:56 pm JST

Will other restaurants, bars and shops around Japan follow suit?

They should. If JGov doesnt care about locals and cares that much about inbound tourism, locals should take matters into their own hands and charge tourists even more.

-32 ( +5 / -37 )

This is a common and accepted practice in South-East Asia, and who would complain since those of us outside Japan earn far more than the average Japanese person? It's only fair.

-15 ( +19 / -34 )

From seething over Biden's xenophobia remarks last week, to openly championing unequal pricing policies the next. This is yet another example of why I am not going to go to bat for the Japanese when they get accused of bigotry.

In fact, I think for the time being, I am going to stop eating at local restaurants altogether, unless they are explicitly pro-foreigner, or are foreigner-run. I've had too many experiences where the guy running the place demands customers order drinks, has items on the menu you can't actually order, panics because you can't read JLPT N1 level kanji, or doesn't allow payment by credit card.

So now I am to collectively punish all of them by giving my hard earned money to the likes of Sushiro, Isomaru, Torikizoku, Matsuya, ect. Hate to shill for big companies, but customer service in Japan really is that bad.

-19 ( +30 / -49 )

For decades in China there has been a locals price, and a foreigners price. So if China can do it, why can't Japan?

Foreign people can afford higher prices than Japanese - this is seen through tourist hotel prices being hiked quite steeply in the past few years.

-10 ( +17 / -27 )

virusrexToday  04:53 pm JST

 “I realize that not everyone will be in support of the idea [of different prices],” Yonemitsu says

Let's see if the idea does not end up being a huge mistake and the resulting negative publicity makes people avoid the restaurant.

Do local non-Japanese have to pay more?

What if it's a mixed group of coal and international tourist at the same table sharing the bill?!

11 ( +16 / -5 )

A place to absolutely avoid.

18 ( +36 / -18 )

I’d like to see a place reverse it for the free PR. Let tourist have the discount. Christian Cafe that used to be in shinjuku had a foreigners members card that when shown would let foreigners skip the line and be next to be seated. It was a huge hit for tourist.

-11 ( +14 / -25 )

I'm really torn by this. My gut says it's awful and it should be one price for all. However, if that means the price for us living in Japan also goes up, well I'd rather they just charge the tourists more - they have more money than us!

But is this going to mean every time we go out to a restaurant we'll have to show our ID to prove we live here to get the cheaper price? What if some of the group live here and some are tourists?

What if a restaurant refuses to give you the local price, even though we're living here?

It doesn't leave a good taste in my mouth at all.....but I also don't want to pay more myself!

How about the govt. pull their hands out their pockets and do something to rejuvenate the country and strengthen the yen in a meaningful way. Otherwise we'll all (us foreigners and Japanese) be stuck here, unable to afford a trip overseas.

7 ( +20 / -13 )

Do local non-Japanese have to pay more?

What if it's a mixed group of coal and international tourist at the same table sharing the bill?!

I think your first questiion is already answered in the article (reading gives you knowledge)

As for your second question, I don't think the comment section is the adecuate place to ask for it... perhaps going to the restaurant and ask?

-15 ( +5 / -20 )

The foreign tourists can certainly afford the extra couple of coins. Foreign tourists have more money than Japanese, so this move kind of makes economic sense. I doubt there will be much pushback.

Agree. Also as pointed out above the one price for locals, one price for tourists practice has been common in many popular tourist spots the world over from Asia to Europe to South America. As long as the restaurant is upfront about the prices on their menus i see no issue. Those tourists that have a problem with paying extra 10 bucks for their all you can eat buffet are free to go elsewhere.

3 ( +24 / -21 )

And in other news, the endless Japan glazing continues.

For decades in China there has been a locals price, and a foreigners price. So if China can do it, why can't Japan?

Despite how much people here can say say hateful things about China to their hearts content, I'm really glad to see you guys are capable of extending your consideration to them when Japanese people do something totally embarrassing and inexcusable.

As far as tourists supposedly making more money than Japanese people, you want to know why that is the case? Because people outside of Japan actually advocate for themselves in the workplace - ie, "If you don't give me a raise, I walk". In Japan, the average corporate soldier is too loyal to do this, and that's why so many of them make half of their American counterparts even though they work twice as many hours. By this point, Japan being in the 30s on GDP per Capita even though they are 4th in GDP is kinda their fault. And even having said that, not all foreign tourists in Japan necessarily make more money.

Can we please, PLEASE stop running cover for this country every time they fumble the ball. Seriously, no other society on Earth is held to such low standards.

-19 ( +26 / -45 )

It's literally a complete rejection that the price should be correlated to what it costs. I guess the extra fee on tourists is the xenophobia tax.

-7 ( +20 / -27 )

Clearly a place to avoid that is xenophobic and tries to grab more money from foreigners just because the Japanese yen is weak and they can "afford" the premium? His excuse of making life a bit cheaper for the Japanese is utter BS. People who can afford almost 6000 yen for lunch can fork out another 1000 yen. Btw, isn't this illegal?

-9 ( +16 / -25 )

Daniel NeagariToday 05:06 pm JST

Comments saying this is racist, xenophobic and so on.. coming soon to the comment section.

And rightly so.

-10 ( +18 / -28 )

Is it just about the money/exchange rate, or is there a perception that the inbound tourists might be more likely to have glutinous tendencies and therefore be more costly to serve?

Asking for a friend.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

TaiwanIsNotChinaToday  05:38 pm JST

Daniel NeagariToday 05:06 pm JST

Comments saying this is racist, xenophobic and so on.. coming soon to the comment section.

And rightly so.

If they are open and upfront about it, there's nothing immoral or illegal about it.

You don't have to go there, and I don't think most tourists will mind, but some will, and they just won't go there.

-6 ( +10 / -16 )

I wouldn't call it xenophobic, but an opportunist, swindler, scammer, yeah, all day long. This is not new, there here are many areas in Japan where this happens, nightbars are notorious for scamming people, especially foreigners. Is it illegal...depends, is it unethical? Without a doubt.

4 ( +16 / -12 )

It's literally a complete rejection that the price should be correlated to what it costs.

Is there some law that dictates meal price should correlate to cost? The restaurant sets its prices based on what it thinks customers are willing to pay and in this case it has chosen 2 different price tier strategy and is upfront about it. If some tourists or yourself are not happy with it, just walk down the block and go to another place.

No different from what happens in tourist hot spots the world over.

6 ( +14 / -8 )

BBToday  05:44 pm JST

Is it just about the money/exchange rate, or is there a perception that the inbound tourists might be more likely to have glutinous tendencies and therefore be more costly to serve?

Asking for a friend.

Do you mean 'gluttonous'? Calling them that would certainly be racist - many non-Japanese are larger than the lcoals, so they need more calories - nothing greedy about that.

A buffet-style restaurant should set prices based on the average volume of all customers.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

70% of foreign tourists in Japan are Asian. On the whole they are generally the same or smaller than Japanese. So, this has nothing to do with being charged for eating more or "glutinous tendencies".

It has everything to do with the fact foreign people in Japan have more ¥¥¥ than locals - and even with these raised prices, will see Japanese restaurants as very affordable.

-5 ( +11 / -16 )

It's not a good thing. If this spreads, it will further entrench the justification for Japan's low pay by the corporate overlords. The locals won't be able to afford the prices if they are raised to the "tourist" level, creating something a two-tier economy, making Japan's economy in tourist destinations even more vulnerable to "shocks" such as experienced during a recent pandemic... The bottom line is Japan needs to take some hard decisions to shake off the 35 year long economic stagnation off its back.

The reviews on this place also shed light on the owner's reasoning, that supporting non-Japanese patrons and their food waste due tourists not being able to appreciate the differences in food culture. Whether that's a valid reason/logic I'll let the patron of the restaurant decide.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

5K for lunch ? Seems a bit way too expensive.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

Most of the tourists are other Asians from China, South Korea, and SE Asia.

https://www.tourism.jp/en/tourism-database/stats/inbound/

3 ( +9 / -6 )

70% of foreign tourists in Japan are Asian. On the whole they are generally the same or smaller than Japanese. So, this has nothing to do with being charged for eating more or "glutinous tendencies".

The biggest group comes from South Korea, where people are bigger. In any case, the question is about perceptions. I think there's a perception that foreigners -- because they are large -- eat more.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Athough I qualify for the local price of 5,478 yen lunch, even that's way too much for me and most of my fellow local residents these days. When I do eat out for lunch, I generally stick to the 1 coin (500 yen lunches), although they have become very scarce these days.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Yeah, Japan is not a xenophobic country...

They can paint it as "foreign currencies being higher" all they want. But at the end of the day, when this becomes viral, it will be all about xenophobia.

Good luck.

-2 ( +14 / -16 )

The TBS news video says it is directed at "foreigners" initially.

Can imagine some scenes where fluent Japanese speaking Korean or Japanese get the Japanese price.

Fluent foreign appearing residents get the tourist price.

Residence card checks at the door?

JLPT fluency tests for some sushi?

The creation of more Debito Arudous?

20 ( +25 / -5 )

I must say, the payment system that this restaurant will have to use will be hellsih... I am neutral to this, I understand why but personally I see this system brings some problems.

also.. just as a side note, non-residents (including japanese) don't pay consumition taxes... that is a big discount

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Illegal,

One way to sink your business so fast and take it to the cleaners, a lawyer will take this case and win very easy if not already in the process or even in court.

-2 ( +9 / -11 )

also.. just as a side note, non-residents (including japanese) don't pay consumition taxes... that is a big discount

Everyone in a restaurant pays the 10% sales tax on their bills regardless of whether they are a resident or not.

14 ( +17 / -3 )

non-residents (including japanese) don't pay consumition taxes

Of course they do, what makes you think otherwise?

Are you thinking about tax free shopping for temporary visitors? That does not, because it can not, apply to restaurants.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

So why aren't Japanese restaurant allowing customers to leave tips? or why aren't restaurants allowed to collect tips?

The only reason I can think of is that the J Government is NOT allowing since they will have no control over that extra income!???

Allowing tipping will help staff make that extra income they badly need and will motivate young people to go out and work, it's a win win situation for all involved.

-8 ( +5 / -13 )

Of course they do, what makes you think otherwise?

Are you thinking about tax free shopping for temporary visitors? That does not, because it can not, apply to restaurants.

mmm.... why you assume I am talking about the service tax?..... the cosumptioin tax is one thing the servicve tax is another...I think I stated that it was a side note and is not the main issue of this article..

But i suppose you have want/need to be angry and mad and right.. so go on be free

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Also... tipping in Japan in not illegal. There is no law that punish tipping.

There is no tipping culture, but that does not make it illegal.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

mmm.... why you assume I am talking about the service tax?..... the cosumptioin tax is one thing the servicve tax is another...I think I stated that it was a side note and is not the main issue of this article..

Consumption tax or sales tax is set at 10% for restaurants. The service charge is not a tax but just an additional charge.

All charges are paid by all customers. There are no exemptions.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

why aren't restaurants allowed to collect tips?

I don't see any reason why they would not be allowed. They would have to declare them as income, though, along with the associated headache when declaring taxes on all sides.

Allowing tipping will help staff make that extra income they badly need and will motivate young people to go out and work, it's a win win situation for all involved.

Oh capital-H Heck no. I curse the day when tips become a thing in Japan, let alone having the customer directly pay the staff instead of the employer like in some extremely Western countries.

13 ( +18 / -5 )

Japan is a nontipping country. I am more than happy with that. Workplaces do not allow their staff to collect tips.

17 ( +23 / -6 )

At least they are transparent and announce what they do.

Many restaurants have different prices on their menus in Japanese and English! I had the experience recently, and when I told them, they were very embarrassed and told me they would ask the manager. He was even more embarrassed and told me it was a mistake and charged me the Japanese menu price. Now I always ask for the menu in Japanese.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

mmm.... why you assume I am talking about the service tax?

I don't. What even is the "service tax"?

1 ( +5 / -4 )

It's common in many countries

So hopefully more restaurants, hotels, etc will do this

-12 ( +2 / -14 )

I don't. What even is the "service tax"?

Fine... i meant VAT ok happy.. go run!!

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Yonemitsu says, and acknowledges that it may not be something that larger, chain

I hope he also acknowledges he is being racist!

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

carpslidy

Today 06:43 pm JST

It's common in many countries

> So hopefully more restaurants, hotels, etc will do

No it isn't as in most civilised developed countries this is illegal and is called discrimination!

-3 ( +10 / -13 )

5K for lunch ? Seems a bit way too expensive.

Yes, as far as I'm concerned this is a non story. Why make food for rich Japanese slightly less expensive than food for rich tourists? They're all rich! The main problem in 2024 Japan is not how rich rich Japanese are compared to foreigners. It is how poor ordinary people who baulk at 5000 yen for lunch are.

As someone who thinks they understand food, is it actually worth paying 6000 yen for a buffet?? Can't you get much better quality by ordering off a menu or a o-makase? For that much money I want genuine quality, not stuff yo face quantity.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

I hope he also acknowledges he is being racist!

I am going to be picky here.... but racist against what race??? Asians? Caucasians? hindu?, Africans? Nordincs???

The word you may be looking for may be the one begining with "X"

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Daniel Neagari

Today 06:14 pm JST

just as a side note, non-residents (including japanese) don't pay consumition taxes... that is a big discount

Incorrect!

Tourists with a non resident visa aka tourists visa can get sales tax refund that refund only applies to items being taken out of the country.

Food, or restaurants consumption tax is non refundable!

So everyone pays it!

7 ( +9 / -2 )

And Japanese tourists in [insert foreign country] will be upset when other countries restaurants have copied this and charge extra for them.

-5 ( +7 / -12 )

This is common in Hawaii as well. What's the big deal?

2 ( +11 / -9 )

Also, iirc, the soviet union did something similar. Foreign currency vs domestic currency, as well as foreign-only shops and domestic shops. Ushanka Show on YouTube talks about this.

-11 ( +1 / -12 )

I don't think it's raacist or xenophobic. It's certainly calculated discrimination though and charging higher prices for rich tourists is a common if unpleasant practice from Rome to New York and anyplace that has a tourist flow.

Basically. the practicing restaurants are taking what they can get. Tourists can asily turn around to the zillion other restaurants all over Japan. Not really sure if this qualifies as "price gouging" as that term generally refers to a commodity that is in short supply. Can or should a government enforce proce fixing? Sounds contradictory to anti-monopoly laws.

Japanese food producers do the same thing, They export the best to the highest paying buyers in other countries or prefectures, leaving leftovers (if any) for the locals. And at still high prices too.

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

Japanese food producers do the same thing, They export the best to the highest paying buyers in other countries or prefectures, leaving leftovers (if any) for the locals. And at still high prices too.

That is an unfortunate practice... sadly most exporting countries... at least all the countries I know of do some thing similar to that... the good stuff to the higher price... the leftover to the inside market.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

If and when the yen rate drops, then prices should change to reflect the changes and equal out. Nt to mention, if the yen (yeah I know wishful thinking) ever goes back to 100 yen to $1.00, the "foreigners" should be charged less than the Japanese.

Imagine what would happen then!

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Paying more than 6,578¥ ( local price on weekends ) for a lunch meal then trying to overeat to compensate for it is simply unhealthy and not worth it! Just have a decent and healthy lunch meal at some other restaurants for less than 2,000¥ !

3 ( +5 / -2 )

If and when the yen rate drops, then prices should change to reflect the changes and equal out. Nt to mention, if the yen (yeah I know wishful thinking) ever goes back to 100 yen to $1.00, the "foreigners" should be charged less than the Japanese

Kind of related but remember foreigners already get sweet deals in Japan. Think: the JR pass for one! Also, no consumption tax when buying electronics; 30% of tution at uni... All just because they are foreigners.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

Keep the extra costs to the tourist coming. Great idea. Not.

So we spend about Y2million each time, give or take, when we visited last 3 times on extended trips.

Keep this sort of thing up and we will take our money elsewhere. Easy.

Let's see how things go if your BOJ finally strengthens your currency and the tourist numbers start to fall.

Nowhere else in the world are we charged extra for being a tourist and spending money.

-6 ( +6 / -12 )

So I'm guessing Shogo Yonemitsu won't mind if when he and other Japanese go travelling they are given Japanese only higher prices at restaurants and it's all spelt out in a menu in countries like the US, Canada, Australia, NZ and those of Europe which Japanese people like to visit.

Won't be going to his restaurants anywhere and have already recommended to family and friends in the US who will be visiting later this year, to avoid restaurants run by azz-h###s like Mr Yonemitsu. I also spead the word on social media and recommend others do too.

-2 ( +8 / -10 )

As for people saying that this price discrimination is common everywhere, no it aint. American diners and restaurants don't have a special higher tourist/country of origin price for visitors. Neither do the western European countries in general - you pay a table charge in countries like Italy and France, sometimes a service charge along with it but I have never paid a 'tourist price' in either country. My food and drinks cost what they said on the menu/board above the counter.

If you're paying more as a tourist you're ordering it wrong or not looking around enough. Haven't paid any tourist prices for food and drinks in the UK, Ireland, Germany, Canada, Australian and NZ.

-2 ( +9 / -11 )

Yes, I'm tired of tourists saying Japan goods and foods are cheap.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

lol

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Never heard of them and won't be eating there in the future, either. Japan really has a problem with discriminating against foreigners. I hope one day they'll accept everyone, no matter where you're from, as equals.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

If charging extra, it would be better to add a little extra something or it's not the Japanese way in my opinion. Whatever happened to omotenashi? It is rude to treat guests like that!

6 ( +7 / -1 )

All those that agree with this guy I guess you don't understand how foreign tourism works.

Unlike locals that recirculate money in the country!

Foreign tourist brig money from outside and leave it here, this is far more beneficial to Japan then any yen spent by local it is a gain!

By making them feel abused they will take their money elsewhere and probably not Japan next time!

With the economy as it is the more money brought in to Japan from outside the better!

The shortsightedness of so many here is stunning!

4 ( +9 / -5 )

Don't go! Simple.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

tora

Today 07:24 pm JST

Kind of related but remember foreigners already get sweet deals in Japan. Think: the JR pass for one! Also, no consumption tax when buying electronics; 30% of tution at uni... All just because they are foreigners.

You should check your information again!

The rail pass is no longer anything to care about, they double the price, so it is nearly useless in most cases

As for not paying the sales tax on items being taken out if the country!

Remember for every yen a Japanese spends that yen came from internal, for every yen a foreign tourist spends that yen came from another country they may both be 1 yen but one is far more valuable to Japan than the other one is just recirculated the other is 100% brought to Japan and is one yen we wouldn't have if foreign tourists didn't bring it!

4 ( +10 / -6 )

Does the owner realize that not every country has an exchange rate benefit over Japan?

Also, I guessing Japanese people aren’t getting checked and only foreign looking residents have to go through getting carded. Imagine one’s kids or family being subject to this. I don’t think this should be promoted or encouraged which this publication is clearly doing by putting business hours and pricing…

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Good. If they started charging locals the tourist rates noone in Japan could afford to eat out.

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

Sounds good to me. This is not that uncommon in other countries.

Foreign passport holders often get tax breaks when shopping in Japan that Japanese do not; never heard anyone complain about that before.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Foreign tourists have more money than Japanese

You mean rich foreign tourists have more money than average Japanese?

There will be some poorer foreign tourists, although by definition much rarer, as tourism itself is a costly luxury.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

OssanAmerica

Today 07:00 pm JST

I don't think it's raacist or xenophobic. It's certainly calculated discrimination though and charging higher prices for rich tourists is a common if unpleasant practice from Rome to New York and anyplace that has a tourist flow.

Could you point these out please?

Under both the USA laws, Canadian laws, UK laws and the entire EU :

regulations prohibit businesses from discriminating against customers based on characteristics such as race, nationality, or place of origin.

I think you are a citizen of the USA and should be well aware of this simple fact!

The USA Bost and repeats constantly discrimination is illegal based on race, ethnicity, religion, nationality or place of origin!

If a place is doing this in the USA, EU UK or Canada they are doing so clandestinely and are in violation of the law!

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Nibek32

Today 08:31 pm JST

Sounds good to me. This is not that uncommon in other countries.

> Foreign passport holders often get tax breaks when shopping in Japan that Japanese do not; never heard anyone complain about that before.

And you don't hear Japan or Japanese businesses complaining about those tourists bringing their money to Japan?

You or a local gets his or her pay in Japan from a Japanese company spend it in Japan.

The foreign tourist get his or her money in their country and instead of spending it there they bring it here the 10% sales tax they don't pay is offset by the fact 100% of what they are spending came from outside and is now being left in Japan!

I guess that didnt calculate in many minds here!

1 ( +8 / -7 )

I would never use this restaurant because the prices are higher than I would pay.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Chabbawanga

Today 08:29 pm JST

Good. If they started charging locals the tourist rates noone in Japan could afford to eat out

Oh please, give us a break!

Japan is one of the few developed countries where eating out is still affordable!

I just had a full teshoku meal including miso soup, vegetables, rice, half a hoke (fish) pickles, and tea ¥980 tax included!

And this is not unusual in Japan

4 ( +9 / -5 )

But is this going to mean every time we go out to a restaurant we'll have to show our ID to prove we live here to get the cheaper price? What if some of the group live here and some are tourists?

Simply have the resident in the group show his ID. They're not going to card everyone.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

The foreign tourists can certainly afford the extra couple of coins. Foreign tourists have more money than Japanese

We're not entitled to someone else's money just because they have more of it than we do.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

Fighto! Today  04:56 pm JST

The foreign tourists can certainly afford the extra couple of coins.

Extra couple of coins?

It's 1,100 yen more for each meal. It's 20% more for the weekday lunch.

That's not just a slightly higher price. It's a significantly higher one.

Did you bother doing the math, Fighto -- or did your usual "defend Japan and Japanese people no matter what" urge cause you to skip that step?

1 ( +8 / -7 )

the pricing is simple, with a flat fee for the all-you-can-eat-and-drink plan

So, are they assuming that the foreigners will eat and drink more than the Japanese customers?

Not saying I agree with it, necessarily, but maybe that's why they're charging the foreigners more.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Let see if people understand basic business!

Or basic international business.

If Japan imports more than it exports, then Japan is losing money.

Tourists may be coming to Japan but they bring in money they are not taking out money.

So tourists Yen are a gain for Japan and count as plus for Japan something thus guy doesn't seem to understand and oddly many here don't seem to get that simple fact.

Cheat them like he is doing and they will take that money elsewhere!

How such a basic economic fact is so difficult to understand by so many is shocking!

4 ( +9 / -5 )

At first, I was a bit taken back, but then I took a second thought. I mean the headline is designed to trigger. It's not so much that foreign tourists get charged more as it is a discount to the locals. I mean they could just charge everyone the max price. I can kinda appreciate a business recognizing the inflation/wage issues here in Japan and actually attempt to come up with a solution that provides some relief without hurting the bottom line. I don't think the actual intent was as xenophobic as the article implies vs the attempt to both capitalize on the tourist boom while doing their best to maintain local clientele as well. From a business standpoint, it's a sound strategy.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

In Hawaii, local residents often get a kamaaina discount on their purchases. It has been going on for decades and not only in restaurants.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

TaiwanIsNotChinaMay 9 05:34 pm JST

It's literally a complete rejection that the price should be correlated to what it costs. I guess the extra fee on tourists is the xenophobia tax.

Joe Biden would approve.... j/k

Seriously, Hawaii has been doing this for a very long time, with the Kama'aina discount. So locals prove they are a resident and they get a discount. So have Japanese ID or drivers license, get a discount regardless of nationality. Problem solved.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Many foreign tourists are being handed a menu in Japanese which they cannot read but wait!

Here comes the simplified English course menu which lists prices 40% or more over the Japanese prices.

Welcome to Japan!

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

Japan is not China and it is not Hawaii. I worked in China and there's no comparison with that society nor in Hawaii where I have relatives who were born there. China is not a developed country by the same standards as Japan which developed industrially under Meiji and after WW2 becoming an economic powerhouse. It doesn't have the inequalities that China has - China's tourists and spenders are still an elite there.

Hawaii is very expensive because so much is flown in and its income distribution is different from that in Japan. Japan is a leading world economy with citizens who still manage to travel and spend a lot of money at home and abroad - despite the recent whining about prices and irrelevant comparison of Japanese with tourists who supposedly are 'rich now unlike the poor Japanese' because some foreign currencies are outperforming the yen so it's now cheaper to travel and spend in Japan.

And Japan is not Cambodia or Thailand or Vietnam with the majority of people being genuinely poor compared to foreign tourists. Memo to all the people here justifying the azzhats in Japan who are running the line that the local Japanese need discounts and the foreign tourists need to be exploited because of the poor people of Japan experiencing inflation - Australia's prices are soaring as my friends there tell me yet their hospitality industry aint charging Japanese or other tourists separate prices. As my friends said, anybody justifying this cynical rip off in Japan are wa###s.

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

There was an izakaya in Asakusa that had a sign saying 'No Foreigners,', so at least this restaurant is letting non-Japanese in.

I took the sign down and called the local shiyakusho but they did nothing.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Y'all ignoring the fact that tourism despite its monetary benefits, also has a social cost. The demand for tourism is extremely high - what is wrong with balancing that out with a different price for non-residents in the service industry?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

There was an izakaya in Asakusa that had a sign saying 'No Foreigners,

While I'm sure that there's some of those signs have a xenophobic background, it's generally shorthand for an establishment that feels unprepared or inadequate dealing with non-Japanese speakers. Especially "deep" members-only bars can be forgiven to not wanting to struggle to explain their concept in broken English to every visitor.

I took the sign down

Interesting. Do you have a penchant for meddling with random businesses' things?

and called the local shiyakusho but they did nothing.

Why would they? Establishments are free to choose who they serve and who they don't.

-2 ( +9 / -11 )

/dev/randomToday  11:09 am JST

There was an izakaya in Asakusa that had a sign saying 'No Foreigners,

While I'm sure that there's some of those signs have a xenophobic background, it's generally shorthand for an establishment that feels unprepared or inadequate dealing with non-Japanese speakers. Especially "deep" members-only bars can be forgiven to not wanting to struggle to explain their concept in broken English to every visitor.

If that's the case, why don't they put up a sign that reads, 'Japanese language only'?

The sign automatically excites all non-Japanese people, whether they were born in Japan or not.

So, it's nothing to do with language or communication issues. It's simply discrimination.

I took the sign down

Interesting. Do you have a penchant for meddling with random businesses' things?

I admit I probably went a step too far in taking the sign down - it was just a printed piece of paper stuck on the window with tape, a combination of my impulsivity and rebelliousness and my heightened sense of justice (I have ADHD) and the fact it was late at night. I knew it was not a valuable item I was removing.

and called the local shiyakusho but they did nothing.

Why would they? Establishments are free to choose who they serve and who they don't.

it is illegal to put up a 'no foreigners' sign in Japan. Discrimination against foreigners is prohibited under Japan's Constitution and laws. The Constitution guarantees equality and freedom from discrimination based on race, creed, sex, social status, or family origin (Article 14). Additionally, the Ministry of Justice's Equal Treatment Regulation (1965) prohibits discriminatory treatment based on nationality or ethnicity.

In 2019, Japan enacted the "Act on the Elimination of Discrimination," which specifically prohibits discriminatory expressions or actions based on race, ethnicity, or other attributes. Displaying a "no foreigners" sign would likely violate this law.

Violations can result in fines, and in some cases, criminal charges. Japan has taken steps to promote diversity and inclusion, and such signs are contrary to these efforts. If you encounter such a sign, you can report it to the Ministry of Justice's Human Rights Bureau or local authorities.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Higher fees are something I have paid as a tourist in a number of countries and now a restaurant is charging higher prices for tourists.

I am not a buffet type eater as I do not eat so much.

Good luck to invite Japanese dines with lower prices.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

The first thing I think of, rather than Xenophobic or not, is that it's sad Japan has gone from being a First World country to being obliged to try these Third-World tactics.

1 ( +9 / -8 )

I remember a toothless old man trying to charge me double what he was charging the locals to cross a rickety old wooden bridge over a river in Laos. I thought it was fair enough. However, I walked across. It wasn't the principle, it was the money. The water barely passed my knees.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

HawkToday  01:02 pm JST

I remember a toothless old man trying to charge me double what he was charging the locals to cross a rickety old wooden bridge over a river in Laos. I thought it was fair enough. However, I walked across. It wasn't the principle, it was the money. The water barely passed my knees.

He needs the money more than you do.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Why would they? Establishments are free to choose who they serve and who they don't

They can as they don’t have anti discrimination laws in Japan

However, the power of social media is available to all and that means any Japanese can access negative comments posted by foreigners.

Any owner being discriminatory is likely to lose a percentage of Japanese customers too.

However, when the winners out number the losers then the situation will resolve itself.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The sign automatically excites all non-Japanese people, whether they were born in Japan or not.

So, it's nothing to do with language or communication issues. It's simply discrimination.

I stand by my take that, yes, while some may be discriminatory in intent, most are not. Yes, the sign could be phrased differently, of course it could. But to phrase it differently you would, you know, need English skills the lack of which prompted you to put up the sign in the first place.

Discrimination against foreigners is prohibited under Japan's Constitution and laws.

It is unconstitutional and violates the Constitution's Article 14. But here's the kicker: it is not illegal. Japan doesn't have a law against racial discrimination, neither in the criminal nor the civil code.

However, the power of social media is available to all and that means any Japanese can access negative comments posted by foreigners.

Naturally.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Not really news at all.

Many tourist trap areas do the same.

They have one fee, and the locals (showing legit IDs) can get a slightly cheaper rate or discount.

I don't blame the local businesses at all.

I blame the Japanese government and tourism associations for not promoting other (non famous) areas of Japan.

Making the shinkansen rail pass VERY expensive and not informing people of lesser known areas are definitely not helping spread out the situation.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The yen is very weak right now so tourists have a lot more spending power, I guess that’s the justification. However, it wasn’t very long ago that the yen was very strong and tourists had a lot less to spend here - were a restaurants at that time offering discount prices to tourists? I don’t think so…

2 ( +3 / -1 )

As a rather curious sidenote:

In 2019, Japan enacted the "Act on the Elimination of Discrimination," which specifically prohibits discriminatory expressions or actions based on race, ethnicity, or other attributes.

I tried to find that law, and even a thorough search in Japanese comes up empty. There are three acts on file concerning discrimination, and none of it concerns racial discrimination. Which is curious given the detail you give on the law and all it entails.

Out of curiosity, I asked ChatGPT, and it seems dead convinced this act exists, but the title it gives does not even loosely match any act published in 2019 whatsoever. It even hallucinates a number for the act, and if you look it up by the number you end up at the "Act Partially Amending the Foreign Exchange and Foreign Trade Act". This is downright bizarre, but it shows that ChatGPT is not a reliable source for information.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

/dev/randomToday  01:59 pm JST

As a rather curious sidenote:

In 2019, Japan enacted the "Act on the Elimination of Discrimination," which specifically prohibits discriminatory expressions or actions based on race, ethnicity, or other attributes.

I tried to find that law, and even a thorough search in Japanese comes up empty. There are three acts on file concerning discrimination, and none of it concerns racial discrimination. Which is curious given the detail you give on the law and all it entails.

Out of curiosity, I asked ChatGPT, and it seems dead convinced this act exists, but the title it gives does not even loosely match any act published in 2019 whatsoever. It even hallucinates a number for the act, and if you look it up by the number you end up at the "Act Partially Amending the Foreign Exchange and Foreign Trade Act". This is downright bizarre, but it shows that ChatGPT is not a reliable source for information.

It refers to a 'declaration' established in 2019, not an actual law. It's another step towards a law against racial discrimination. Why it's taking time to create a law that has been standard throughout the rest of the world for decades, I have no idea.

The Declaration of the Japan Federation of Bar Associations, adopted on October 10, 2019, which aims to eliminate discrimination and promote human rights ¹. The declaration emphasizes the importance of promoting diversity and inclusivity, particularly in the context of Japan's increasingly diverse society. It also acknowledges the historical and ongoing struggles of marginalized communities, including the Ainu, Ryukyuans, and foreign residents, and calls for efforts to address and prevent discrimination.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

/dev/randomToday  01:42 pm JST

The sign automatically excites all non-Japanese people, whether they were born in Japan or not.

So, it's nothing to do with language or communication issues. It's simply discrimination.

I stand by my take that, yes, while some may be discriminatory in intent, most are not. Yes, the sign could be phrased differently, of course it could. But to phrase it differently you would, you know, need English skills the lack of which prompted you to put up the sign in the first place.

Discrimination against foreigners is prohibited under Japan's Constitution and laws.

It is unconstitutional and violates the Constitution's Article 14. But here's the kicker: it is not illegal. Japan doesn't have a law against racial discrimination, neither in the criminal nor the civil code.

However, the power of social media is available to all and that means any Japanese can access negative comments posted by foreigners.

You don't need 'English skills' to write - 'Japanese language only'.

Plus, they have phones with translation apps or at least they will know about them.

Or they could search online - come on it's 2024!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It refers to a 'declaration' established in 2019, not an actual law.

So it's actually not illegal. I still wonder why you wrote

Violations can result in fines, and in some cases, criminal charges.

but I blame ChatGPT for tha and won't press you any further. For your own good, please don't rely on ChatGPT as a source of information, especially legal information. It is a large language model, not a search engine, its goal is to give you an answer with full conviction, whether that answer is correct or not.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Unfortunately, there are no discrimination laws in Japan.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

You don't need 'English skills' to write - 'Japanese language only'.

Plus, they have phones with translation apps or at least they will know about them.

Or they could search online - come on it's 2024!

I wholeheartedly agree with you, but this is Japan. If you made it a drinking game to spot weird, awful or downright wrong English translations, you would need to call an ambulance in advance.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I would be quite interested to know how they intend to apply this in practice. Check 在留カード, or passports? What about for citizens who have perhaps acquired citizenship through naturalisation, or for a person of another ethnicity born here?

While they have no authority to check any kind of document, I'd quite like to see the situation where they actually check every visitor's documents. And the time i'd take. And the effort to check validity of every document.

Some people like this double approach, but now, imagine if a restaurant in Tokyo, for example, had "tourists or other foreigners eat for free, Japanese citizens and residents pay full price" on the menu. I can imagine the uproar already.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

It is being pushed as a discount, a beneficial act subject to certain conditions. If you fail to prove you are a local to their satisfaction, they do not grant you the discount.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

There's a word for things like this.....Scam.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

> /dev/randomToday  02:18 pm JST

It refers to a 'declaration' established in 2019, not an actual law.

So it's actually not illegal. I still wonder why you wrote

Violations can result in fines, and in some cases, criminal charges.

but I blame ChatGPT for tha and won't press you any further. For your own good, please don't rely on ChatGPT as a source of information, especially legal information. It is a large language model, not a search engine, its goal is to give you an answer with full conviction, whether that answer is correct or not.

Japan has an anti-discrimination law, but it is not one that is special for racial discrimination, as in most other nations.

The Promotion of Efforts to Eliminate Unfair Discriminatory Speech and Behavior Against Persons Originating from Outside Japan, enacted in 2016.

Discrimination based on race, ethnicity, or nationality is addressed under various laws and regulations in Japan. While there may not be specific fines designated solely for racial discrimination, broader legal provisions prohibit discrimination in various contexts, including employment, housing, education, and public accommodations.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

He needs the money more than you do.

So do you. But that's why I said it was fair enough. I just happened to notice the river wasn't particularly deep, wide, or fast. The 'not the principle' line was a play for laughs.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The Promotion of Efforts to Eliminate Unfair Discriminatory Speech and Behavior Against Persons Originating from Outside Japan, enacted in 2016.

... is, nomen est omen, a law against hate speech. It has no bearing on this situation.

While there may not be specific fines designated solely for racial discrimination, broader legal provisions prohibit ... (snip)

Can you please stop copypasting ChatGPT? You need to realize its purpose is to tell you what it thinks you want to hear, factual correctness is secondary to that goal.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

/dev/randomToday  03:24 pm JST

The Promotion of Efforts to Eliminate Unfair Discriminatory Speech and Behavior Against Persons Originating from Outside Japan, enacted in 2016.

... is, nomen est omen, a law against hate speech. It has no bearing on this situation.

'Behaviour' is not speech.

While there may not be specific fines designated solely for racial discrimination, broader legal provisions prohibit ... (snip)

Can you please stop copypasting ChatGPT? You need to realize its purpose is to tell you what it thinks you want to hear, factual correctness is secondary to that goal.

I understand your concern, but I'm not simply copying and pasting from ChatGPT. I'm using it as a tool to assist me in generating ideas and providing information. I understand the importance of factual accuracy and critical thinking, and I'm doing my best to verify the information I share. If you have any specific concerns or questions, I'm happy to discuss them with you and provide further clarification.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

I would understand if it took effort to deliver a different service for foreign tourists, but it’s all you can eat.

They are serving food at a price suited to the Japanese market. They are doing business in Japan. I’d be happy with the fact that my shop was full of people. I’m sure there are plenty of rich Japanese people too. Do you charge more for them?

They want to keep a local clientele, maybe in this case, this is a good way to deter tourists from coming. Or they could just charge full price to everyone and see how it goes!

Maybe enact a rewards-based system to those who frequent the shop. Eat here 6 times and get your 7th meal free.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Shadows of the Rising Sun

"Japan has no laws prohibiting racial, ethnic, or religious discrimination, or discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Japan does not have a national human rights institution."

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Japan has no laws prohibiting racial, ethnic, or religious discrimination, or discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Japan does not have a national human rights institution."

Japan does indeed have laws that address discrimination, but they may not be as comprehensive as in some other countries. For instance, Japan's Constitution guarantees equality under the law and prohibits discrimination based on race, creed, sex, social status, or family origin. Additionally, there are laws that specifically prohibit discrimination in employment based on race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, and gender. However, Japan does not have specific legislation that explicitly prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Japan has no laws prohibiting racial, ethnic, or religious discrimination, or discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Japan does not have a national human rights institution.

https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2023/country-chapters/japan#:~:text=Japan%20has%20no%20laws%20prohibiting,a%20national%20human%20rights%20institution.

There is no comprehensive law prohibiting racial, ethnic, or religious discrimination.

https://www.state.gov/reports/2022-country-reports-on-human-rights-practices/japan#:~:text=in%20the%20Diet.-,Systemic%20Racial%20or%20Ethnic%20Violence%20and%20Discrimination,%2C%20ethnic%2C%20or%20religious%20discrimination.

Japan lacks any law which prohibits racial, ethnic, or religious discrimination. The country also has no national human rights institutions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racism_in_Japan

2 ( +5 / -3 )

wallaceToday  04:12 pm JST

Japan has no laws prohibiting racial, ethnic, or religious discrimination, or discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Japan does not have a national human rights institution.

https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2023/country-chapters/japan#:~:text=Japan%20has%20no%20laws%20prohibiting,a%20national%20human%20rights%20institution.

There is no comprehensive law prohibiting racial, ethnic, or religious discrimination.

https://www.state.gov/reports/2022-country-reports-on-human-rights-practices/japan#:~:text=in%20the%20Diet.-,Systemic%20Racial%20or%20Ethnic%20Violence%20and%20Discrimination,%2C%20ethnic%2C%20or%20religious%20discrimination.

Japan lacks any law which prohibits racial, ethnic, or religious discrimination. The country also has no national human rights institutions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racism_in_Japan

Thanks, Wallace; I think this has been well established now by you, myself and several other people. :)

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

Non-Japanese looking customers living in Japan will have to show their My Number or Residents Card.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

wallaceToday  04:22 pm JST

Non-Japanese looking customers living in Japan will have to show their My Number or Residents Card.

OMG, I hope this doesn't spread, aye.

We might have to start wearing Asian face masks :)

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

Foreigners should boycott the restaurant and post online reviews.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

OMG, I hope this doesn't spread, aye.

> We might have to start wearing Asian face masks :)

All foreigners are required by law to carry ID.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

wallaceToday  04:27 pm JST

OMG, I hope this doesn't spread, aye.

We might have to start wearing Asian face masks :)*

All foreigners are required by law to carry ID.

Ah, but we have to wear an Asian face mask, they're not going to ask for our ID, right? :)

If nothing else it would make a great Youtube video. :)

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

My thought is if you know this is the case with certain restaurants, it's up to you to decide. There are other Japanese restaurants (chain restaurants), convenience stores, supermarkets, and other places that keep their prices the same for everyone, regardless. Since tourists have the money, they have the power, too.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Foreigners should boycott the restaurant and post online reviews.

That's what they do anyway, along with blogs.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

To leverage tourists in such a disingenuous manner sends out an appallingly negative message, detrimental to Japan belief system of treating all peoples with respect, it brings dishonour and prejudice.

Shameful

3 ( +5 / -2 )

> Chico3Today  05:13 pm JST

My thought is if you know this is the case with certain restaurants, it's up to you to decide. There are other Japanese restaurants (chain restaurants), convenience stores, supermarkets, and other places that keep their prices the same for everyone, regardless. Since tourists have the money, they have the power, too.

Just wear a hat, a mask and glasses, and they won;t know you're non-Japanese if you speak fluent Japanese.

Or go with a Japanese person to do the talking. ;0

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Pardon me if I go slightly off-topic: Twice in the last month, once in Nagoya and once in Takayama, I saw signs outside stores in both Japanese and English saying 'don't come in the store unless you want to buy something'. The store in Takayama added 'children are not allowed in the store' This was a stationary (sic) store. This just seems wrong to me, maybe not illegal, but wrong. Where is Debito Arudou when you need him?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

john bToday  05:23 pm JST

Pardon me if I go slightly off-topic: Twice in the last month, once in Nagoya and once in Takayama, I saw signs outside stores in both Japanese and English saying 'don't come in the store unless you want to buy something'. The store in Takayama added 'children are not allowed in the store' This was a stationary (sic) store. This just seems wrong to me, maybe not illegal, but wrong. Where is Debito Arudou when you need him?

The problem with signs like that is that some people who want to buy something may see them and feel that the owner is a bit stuck up or even scary (or kibishisugi) and not go in.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

To be fair there are a number of cafes, beef bowl, Ramen joints in Japan, along with some Pubs, greasy spoons in London that cater for certain type of clientele, construction workers, brickies, anything wearing a fluorescent Jacket that discourages tourists/foreigners.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Tamatebako is a new restaurant that opened last month

They need to change the name then as it's false advertising

Tamate baka perhaps would be more appropriate

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Japanese-speaking-only restaurant or Izakaya.

https://www.tokyoweekender.com/japan-life/news-and-opinion/izakaya-owner-defends-japanese-language-only-policy/?utm_source=flipboard&utm_content=topic%2Fjapan

0 ( +2 / -2 )

So this isn't illegal, then?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The best way to deal with this issue is by membership card.

The restaurant I use frequently gives me 10 % discount, regardless if I am a foreigner or Japanese.

You keep the membership if you spend a certain minimum amount per year. If you spend over a certain amount you get also additionally free drinks and desserts.

A guest who is showing up only one time pays the full price, tourist or local does not matter.

How can a cashier know who is a tourist or local or not? There are also Japanese who are not living in Japan but permanently in Singapore or elsewhere, there are Chinese from Taiwan living in Japan who speak Japanese like a native - the cashier to know who is who has to insist on identification, like the MyNumberCard, residence card...

Living in Japan as a foreign national since more than 40 years I would never enter a restaurant with such a policy and I am also unwilling to pay for a weekday lunch 5,478 yen.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I suggest you put a sign up about how your going to charge tourist more for their food than the locals. How dare you assume that all tourist have more moneg than locals??? I find it very offensive and pathetic and knowing this, I would not want to touch your food ever!). I will make sure to avoid your restaraunt when I visit.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

The excuse that tourists are more in pocket because of the weakening yen just isn't true. Prices are increasing globally, not only in Japan. Yes, against GDP and a couple of other currencies the Yen is weaker, but that doesn't all of a sudden mean that Japan is as cheap for tourists like some other Asian countries. To think that all tourists in Japan have this magic spending power is just wrong. This idea of charging tourists more, or locals less is just going to put tourists off going there.

On a trip to London a few years ago, if I had walked into a pub and been charged more than the locals standing at the bar there would be outrage. Same product should be the same price, regardless of nationality. This kind of thing needs to be made illegal asap or else Japan will become unattractive to tourists and they will go to the actually cheaper (and maybe more friendly to tourists) countries like Thailand, Vietnam etc.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

To be fair the tourists money is worth more ?

This must be one of Kishida's new capitalism scam ideas

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It sounds like most are OK with this provided it is called, "a Japan resident discount" rather than "two prices-- the Japanese price and and tourist price." Although semantics may differ the effect is the same, except fewer are offended by it.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

That also happens in Italy. One price for the locals and another for the visitors.

I don't eat in the tourist traps like you do.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Is Japan becoming so financially desperate to do such a daylight scam?

Never happens in Naha!

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

We ran into this in Russia in the 90's, figured it was Russia, so understandable. But Japan?, sorry to see this happening.

I will avoid any place that has a policy like this.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

gcFd1

That also happens in Italy. One price for the locals and another for the visitors.

I don't eat in the tourist traps like you do.

I only eat in restaurants occupied mostly by Italians. Usually down the back streets or up the steps.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Yohan

May 11 10:21 am JST

The best way to deal with this issue is by membership card

You offered a common sense solution...and didn't get 50 downvotes? What is your secret?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

-1( +0 / -1 )

One person doesn't like me asking questions. Anyone else?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

It’s completely unacceptable for a business to charge one group more than another for exactly the same product or service. Local authorities imposing a small tourist tax in order to fund suitable facilities or even to limit tourist numbers is not unreasonable. Price gouging tourists just “because” when they’re bringing money and jobs to the country is opportunistic and short sighted. Advertising that you gouge tourists is plain stupid.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I am married to a Japanese National, We go back home to visit the family regularly yet I am considered an outsider. I go to Japan to visit my family not as a tourist. I resent paying a higher price just because I have a different passport but my family can pay regular price? Be careful how you define tourist and outsider and how do you make the decision at time of purchase. Japan businesses cried to have tourists come back for survival, now some are complaining it is to busy? You can't have it both ways!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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