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NHK reporter laughed at for asking black hole team for more on Japan’s contributions

74 Comments
By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

This week scientists released the first-ever captured image of a black hole. It’s a major milestone in scientific progress, and it can’t help but make most of us ponder both the vastness of the cosmos and the amazing capabilities of the human species.

However, to one reporter from Japan’s public broadcaster NHK, this momentous milestone was also the perfect opportunity to remind the world that Japan is pretty great too, you know.

The U.S. government’s National Science Foundation, one of dozens of organizations around the globe that contribute to the Event Horizon Telescope project which captured the image, held a press conference to discuss its success and findings. When the floor was opened up to questions, one came from the NHK reporter whose query, as shown in the video above, was: “I have a question about the international collaboration. I understand this is the enormous backup collaboration. Could you tell me more about the detail of the each country’s contribution, especially Japan?”

After the reporter speaks his home country’s name, there’s a brief pause, followed by a roll of soft laughter from the other journalists in attendance. A handful of Japanese Twitter users, though, have responded in a harsher tone.

“While the journalists from all sorts of other countries were asking questions about science, the NHK reporter was all like ‘Tell me about the contributions of Japan!’”

 “The question from the NHK reporter during the NSF press conference was totally embarrassing.”

“That’s all you can expect from a public broadcaster. Does he know why he got laughed at? Is he embarrassed about what he did? It makes me sad to see how shallow Japan is, on an international level, about things like this exposed.”

However, Sheperd Doeleman, Event Horizon Telescope project director and the panelist who fielded the NHK reporter’s question, was willing to at least partially indulge him, responding with:

“I can say something about that. I’ve worked very closely with many people at the national astronomical observatory of Japan and others. Japan has played a very key role, as have a number of countries. Japan, for example, was one of the key members of the project that phased up ALMA. They took all the dishes in the ALMA [radio telescope] array in the high Atacama Desert [in Chile], and they made them essentially one dish that we could record on one set of equipment, and that has been huge. And they’ve been a key partner in the imaging techniques, and pushing that forward too.”

However, Doleman made sure to bring his statement back toward crediting the project’s success to the efforts of all its contributors, wrapping up his answer with:

But the key is that each country, each region, each group, each institute, brought something in kind, and they brought their expertise, and they brought their work. You know, at the end of the day, you just need the stuff to get done, and everyone came with a full heart, really, and the expertise and the energy, to make this image that we’ve presented to you today.”

The “So anyway, what about Japan?” aspect of the NHK reporter’s question brings to mind the way that Japanese media organizations love to boast about the accomplishments of Japanese athletes on the world stage, sometimes trumpeting their victories as evidence of the greatness of the Japanese spirit. And in the reporter’s defense, it stands to reason that NHK’s audience would be especially interested in, and inspired by, the contributions of Japanese scientists. Still, at least a few critics would have preferred he’d been less concerned with national distinctions while gazing out into the wonders of space.

Source: YouTube/TIME via Jin via Twitter/@hausenjapan

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- Japanese reporters’ lame questions to tennis star Naomi Osaka embarrass netizens

-- Japan’s public broadcaster goes thug-style, tags the house of man who refuses to pay fees

-- NHK bill collector arrested for kissing woman on the job: “I thought we were hitting it off!”

© SoraNews24

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

74 Comments
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provided onigiri?

18 ( +21 / -3 )

This joker could have found that information very easily on Google without making a complete fool of himself and making Japan look petty.

23 ( +27 / -4 )

Stop it with this embarrassing stuff Japan, blech. I already get my fill of that being American.

13 ( +22 / -9 )

53rd minute for the goofball from NHK's question. This is one of many aspects of Japanese culture society that I will never understand. It's like Japan claiming Naomi Osaka once she started to win tennis tournaments. This patting themselves on the back for something they really had very little to do, but to make it seem like without them it would have never occurred.

30 ( +34 / -4 )

Japan is just soo sugooi, and its contribution was more ' sugoi' then anybody else,s.

Is that satisfactory ? Now for the NHK to run ad nausea a story about this sugoi contribution ..which btw is due to the sugoi international cooperation spirit of the Abe government which will soon be asking for your support at election ballot box. Yeah we get it Mr. NHK.

14 ( +19 / -5 )

Oh, lay off. It was an innocuous and interesting question and a bit humorous to boot.

I think people are being a bit too critical here.

-12 ( +19 / -31 )

Embarrassing. Luckily not all Japanese people are idiots like this guy.

13 ( +18 / -5 )

This is funny. So NHK. Maybe NHK will come out with a news story like "We Japan and what the Black Hole thinks of us"

15 ( +19 / -4 )

I don't need to see the video for this. I can totally imagine it.

15 ( +18 / -3 )

Speed - occasionally I'd say yes - but if your watched NHK news last night, you'd be mistaken if you didn't think that the Japanese research team were responsible for the actual photo to be seen. They actually said it was the Japanese research team that developed the tech to take the photo.

Meanwhile the global news has been going quite bonkers over the achievements of the WHOLE team, and in particular that of super-woman Katie Bourman who created the algorithm for it all to happen. She collaborated of course, but it was HER genius that was at the forefront. Some have even suggested naming the Black Hole "Bourman" in her honour.

Here's a Ted Talk she gave 3 years ago at the tender age of 26 explaining what they / she are on about.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7n2rYt9wfU

Not a sniff from NHK. Their take last night was it was a Japanese "invention".

28 ( +32 / -4 )

So it’s OK for the ”global news” (France? Turkey? Uzbekistan? China?) to expound on and laud Dr. Bourman, but not OK for Japan to heap praise on their scientists? It’s natural for citizens of their country to want to learn about and be proud about their country’s achievements. For example, in the 2020 Olympics, Russians are going to be most interested in how many medals their superheroes win.

-15 ( +8 / -23 )

Honestly, the media of every Country do this, this article is stupid. I didn't even know that the U.S. and Japan played some role in this project, because in Italian media it was praised as a European success.

-17 ( +9 / -26 )

So it’s OK for the ”global news” (France? Turkey? Uzbekistan? China?) to expound on and laud Dr. Bourman, but not OK for Japan to heap praise on their scientists? It’s natural for citizens of their country to want to learn about and be proud about their country’s achievements. For example, in the 2020 Olympics, Russians are going to be most interested in how many medals their superheroes win.

I think the point was, the photo could have been taken without the help of Japan. Nobody is saying they aren't appreciated, just the fact that NHK fails to recognize the people who were really behind the achievement...

15 ( +20 / -5 )

Meanwhile, in the real world:

"The black hole that was depicted for the first time this week in an image produced in a landmark experiment has been named by a language professor in Hawaii.

University of Hawaii-Hilo Hawaiian professor Larry Kimura named the cosmic object Powehi, The Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported Thursday.

The world’s first image of a black hole revealed on Wednesday was created using data from eight radio telescopes around the world.

Powehi means “the adorned fathomless dark creation” or “embellished dark source of unending creation” and comes from the Kumulipo, an 18th century Hawaiian creation chant. Po is a profound dark source of unending creation, while wehi, meaning honoured with embellishments, is one of the chant’s descriptions of po, the newspaper reported.

“To have the privilege of giving a Hawaiian name to the very first scientific confirmation of a black hole is very meaningful to me and my Hawaiian lineage that comes from po,” Kimura said in a news release.

A Hawaiian name was justified because the project included two telescopes in Hawaii, astronomers said.

“As soon as he said it, I nearly fell off my chair,” said Jessica Dempsey, deputy director of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea.

Dempsey was among 200 scientists who worked to capture an image of the massive black hole in the M87 galaxy nearly 54 million light-years from Earth."

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/apr/12/powehi-black-hole-gets-a-name-meaning-the-adorned-fathomless-dark-creation

The "adorned fathomless dark creation” or “embellished dark source of unending creation.” Crikey, isn't that beautiful.

Not a sniff from NHK. Their take last night was it was a Japanese "invention".

Abechanneru is an absolute disgrace. It pains me to have to hand over money to such frauds.

10 ( +16 / -6 )

@Alfie: so, now it's a Hawaii (American) thing? And you call that "the real world"? It's the Guardian world. Every source put in evidence what wants.

@Deadforgood: every player was necessary, this is why it's an International collaboration, your "the photo could have been taken without x help" is stupid.

Anyway I am surprised, because I thought it was mainly an European project.

-8 ( +8 / -16 )

@Deadforgood: every player was necessary, this is why it's an International collaboration, your "the photo could have been taken without x help" is stupid.

Yes, I know. But so is "the photo was a Japanese achievement" statement... Again, my point is concerning the article, which is about a silly network called NHK, NOT whose achievement it was...

5 ( +10 / -5 )

@Alfie: so, now it's a Hawaii (American) thing? And you call that "the real world"? It's the Guardian world. Every source put in evidence what wants.

The "real world" comment was regarding the NHK report last night that implied this was totally the work of a Japanese team. Can you see the NHK 7pm news in Italy? Do you have any idea how selective NHK reporting is?

12 ( +17 / -5 )

Also, if you read more about the project, the algorithm which allowed for the photo to be taken was supported and proved through the global efforts of various countries. The actual achievement goes to the creator of the algorithm, and who cares about what country they are from. We're all people.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Speed Today  04:26 pm JST

Oh, lay off. It was an innocuous and interesting question and a bit humorous to boot.

I think people are being a bit too critical here.

So do I.

-7 ( +5 / -12 )

Yes, I know. But so is "the photo was a Japanese achievement" statement... Again, my point is concerning the article, which is about a silly network called NHK, NOT whose achievement it was...

When did they say it was ONLY a Japanese achievement? My point was that EVERY Country media put in evidence mainly their Country contribution.

As I told you, I thought it was mainly a European project:

EU-funded scientists unveil first ever image of a black hole

Source: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-19-2053_en.htm

-8 ( +6 / -14 )

Recognition hungry?? Lolz

2 ( +6 / -4 )

When did they say it was ONLY a Japanese achievement? My point was that EVERY Country media put in evidence mainly their Country contribution.

NHK said it on TV last night. That the photo was taken through the efforts of Japanese scientists.

14 ( +18 / -4 )

@Alfie: I can read NHK press. And this NHK article doesnt' say what you are saying:

Scientists unveil first-ever image of black hole

https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20190411_01/

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

He is very special.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

What else can you expect. There is a mix of desperation and arrogance at the same time. Japanese are desperate to hear their own praise ! Sad and hilarious :)

7 ( +13 / -6 )

@Alfie Noakes

Is that the real world? More like a real eye-roller. I don't know if it's more an example of pretentiousness or of people giving themselves too much credit.

"All of the researchers involved communicated in English to complete the project, and so it was decided to name the black hole Bob, an acronym for Big! Oh boy!"

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Re: comments along the lines of "every country does this, lay off" - well if you really think that you either don't speak Japanese, or you do but are not paying attention.

Let me tell you as story. One of my family members is from a minor country that is never, ever in the news. Imagine how wonderful it was (for an instant) when my in-laws rang specifically to tell me this nation was now being featured on a TV show. In a hurry I switched on the TV. A TV crew was following around another TV crew from our little country. They were of course touring Japan. After a brief introduction to the country they came from, the rest of the show was not just "what do they think of Japan?" but celebrities guessing what the foreign TV crew thought of Japan, even taking time to explain their speculation on what the foreign guests thought of Japan, ideas which often turned out to be wrong once we had the big reveal on how Japan really looked to these visitors.

Anyway, s this level of navel-gazing normal in your country? Is it really? I have lived in a number of places and never come across anything like it anywhere. The thing is, it was not always this bad. The "what do they think of us?" "aren't we great?", "look what we can do?" aspect of Japanese culture, is, as anyone who has lived here for a while can tell you, getting worse and worse. It is driven by the government and their desire to instill "national pride" whatever that might mean. It is not a permanent or desirable feature of Japanese culture that everyone here accepts as sensible.

Some readers maybe surprised that not all Japanese people are on board with this by any means. You can check this yourself. Try Googling, say, "Japan" "praise" "TV show" "makes me embarrassed" in Japanese (日本、褒める、テレビ番組、恥ずかしい) and other similar terms about loving yourself (including a few which are unrepeatable here), you can find reams and reams of Japanese people complaining about this approach to national self-promotion. This is only natural. One aspect of Japanese cultural identity is that Japanese people are modest. You cannot do both these things at that same time.

However, as Japanese culture can seem relatively uniform, especially if you rely on the TV, major newspapers and official pronouncements, there are always going to be newcomers to Japan and Japan 'fans' who cannot see the current wave of self-promotion in a timeline context and have no idea how government policy changes down the decades. These people will fall into the trap of believing that what Japan is like now is what it has always been like and will forever remain and therefore this nonsense is an essential part of Japanese culture that is above criticism.

Then, when more perceptive resident foreigners point out the obvious opinion, (shared by numerous Japanese people themselves), that the navel-gazing is currently getting out of hand, they are dismissed for "not understanding Japanese culture" or "Japan-bashing" or even "cultural imperialism".

These criticisms are way-off-the-mark, and pretty ironic to be honest.

20 ( +25 / -5 )

@Uchuujin: no, what is sad is articles like this, and people who deny the evidence, despite the links I put. The EU press site put in evidence mainly the EU role, it's only natural.

NHK is the public Japanese news network and it's supposed to do the same, despite in the article of NHK I didn't find any paticular praise toward Japan.

-6 ( +6 / -12 )

@Alfie: I can read NHK press. And this NHK article doesnt' say what you are saying:

You're not getting this, are you. We're not talking about that brief article you linked to, we're talking about last night's 7pm NHK News that implied Japanese scientists were responsible for taking the photo. Okay?

9 ( +14 / -5 )

NHK is also the channel that often only reports which of the Japanese runners finished first in a marathon, completely ignoring any foreign runners who may have actually won the race. US baseball games are only reported on if a Japanese was involved etc.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

The point to all this..?

Those in the media are not necessarily politically or socially or otherwise savvy and also do have an agenda of their own which is not directly related to "reporting" but biased toward "opining". Besides a direct word for word "quotation", any phrase that includes words such as "want, like, could, would, should, may, shall, will, need, etc. with to or have to" are an indication of an "opinion" and not factual data or reporting. That will make such phrases a "comment" on the part of the reporter.

Here the reporter may have asked a "sensitive" question which indicated a personal bias and pride of sorts but such questions may be asked as he does represent an entity for whom he works. The rest is a matter of public opinion. What matters is.., what he actually reported. As long as he does not add his opinion, then that report is a valid news report.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

I don't necessarily think that NHK reporting on Japan's contributions is a bad thing. By doing that, it teaches the public the importance of tax dollars contributing to science, and helps ensure that money continues to come in.

Compare that to some countries that have a hard time getting public funding for science because taxpayers think it's a waste of money.

It's important for the press to report how Japanese public money is turned into successes so that the Japanese public will continue to want to fund it.

On the other hand, that NHK reporter probably could have gotten that information outside of the scope of the Q&A session.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

*thought process

1 ( +3 / -2 )

How is a Japanese person supposed to know the contributiion of its own Country, by reading only American/English news about this topic? I had to read Italian news in Italian to know in particular Italian role in this project. There's nothing wrong in articles like this:

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20190411/p2g/00m/0fe/083000c

One guy in NHK tv news said it was only a Japanese project? I doubt it, but also in this case, it's just one guy, stop acting like if every Japanese news source is saying the same.

-12 ( +3 / -15 )

Fair point - trying to describe a confusing and contradictory place produces much confusion and contradiction!

Thanks for reading.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Scientist: But the key is that each country, each region, each group, each institute, brought something in kind, and they brought their expertise, and they brought their work.

NHK Reporter: Who brought the most, though?

6 ( +9 / -3 )

@jpn_guy: no, it's mainly because the Anglosaxon point of view is contradictory itself, when it tries to portrait foreign ethnocentrism. Any other Country in the world is fed with American/British culture, from pop to mainstream political, economic, and social view. Sorry if also the other cultures try to affirm their existence, at least in their own media!

-11 ( +3 / -14 )

It is what it is.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

NHK Reporter: Who brought the most, though?

This wasn't his question, tho.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

Not surprising. A huge portion of Japanese TV programming is dedicated to bragging about Japan and its people. It's a genre unto its own. My wife watches some of it and I find it really insufferable and leave the room after about 10 minutes. Like, insecurity, much?

If there's a tech story on NHK's News 7, count on it being some purely "Japanese innovation" by gambateiru nihonjin.

"I already get my fill of that being American."

I don't find that. Achievements by the likes of Apple, Google, NASA etc are rarely associated Americanism, rather they're portrayed as universal achievements.

14 ( +18 / -4 )

I don't find that.

Really? American nationalism is the cringiest thing ever, at the point that also a scene supposed to criticize that, is a praise of America, like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPHSXUS0_1c

-13 ( +5 / -18 )

@JeffLee

On that point, many Japanese think gaijin think likewise. I have a background in science/mechanical engineering and have worked with Japanese engineers who reeled off a list of great British scientists and engineers - Newton, Maxwell, Watt etc. I’d just thought of them as great minds rather than Brits but they seemed to think it should be a source of great pride for me.

Very strange.

13 ( +16 / -3 )

N.B. In the video that I linked, the embarrassing part starts at 4:37, but I doubt Americans are able to see why it is embarrassing.

-10 ( +3 / -13 )

American nationalism is the cringiest thing ever

I can think of more cringeworthy things than that.

By the way, it is a fact that the US is a world leader in science. Some may not like it, but it is a factual statement.

9 ( +13 / -4 )

I can think of more cringeworthy things than that.

So, that video isn't cringeworthy enough for you?

By the way, it is a fact that the US is a world leader in science. 

Also other Countries are world leaders in science.

-9 ( +4 / -13 )

So, that video isn't cringeworthy enough for you?

Dunno. Didn’t click on it.

Okay, I’ll be more honest. I’d say the US is the world leader in science at this point in time.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

Okay, I’ll be more honest. I’d say the US is the world leader in science at this point in time.

How is this relevant? Wasn't this project an international collaboration?

-10 ( +6 / -16 )

I had no idea Japan contributed to this great scientific event.

It was not only a great question, it's something that many had no idea about.

Anything Japan does, even if it's a question, the trolls get upset and have something to say.

-10 ( +5 / -15 )

we see this all the time ,even with the Nodel prizes, last few have been co-won by Japanese and gaijin but youd never even know about the gaijin because of all the news focused on the Japanese it makes it out as if it was their achievement alone

6 ( +9 / -3 )

The question as reported gives a perspective on what the reporter thought (rightly or wrongly) his audience wanted to hear.

Have just gone and looked at the BBC report on this announcement which simply reported the amazing science, the international collaboration needed to achieve it and the innovative algorithm without which it could not have been done (and I don’t think the BBC is always as unbiased as they should be).

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Meant to add that this is how I would expect it to be reported and I am sure (though without doing a trawl of the international news) many other news outlets around the world did precisely that.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Don't blame that reporter.

When it comes to national pride, all countries are the same....

-9 ( +6 / -15 )

Alex - I think the point some of us were making re NHK's domestic broadcast last night, was not only did it focus mainly on the Japanese scientists without mentioning the hoardes of others (ok it's Japan- I know), but they accredited the photo tech to the local scientists and actually said they developed it.

Ok maybe it was only a few bonehead producers, scriptos and journos who decided to go with that, but one can't help feeling it's part of the "sontaku effect" that NHK finds itself entrenched in.

Give praise where praise is due, but don't limit it because the recipients aren't Japanese. So many cases of this recently.

I'm sure the Japanese scientists are way, way above all this nationalistic leaning that despoils so many interesting stories.

And I guarantee that Katie Bourman's achievements will appear in the media here as her name/fame spreads.

NHK - just a little late to the party.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

NHK is a political instrument paid by a brainwashed audience.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

This, fellow JT readers, is a teachable moment. This, more than many other things reveals some core aspect of Japanese psychology...of course, the narcissistic nationalism. Obviously. More than anything, almost more than a horrid death, most Japanese hate to be laughed at. I hope the reporter gets the psychological counseling he probably needs.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

LOL!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@buzzboy: most of readers here isn't even Japanese, me included, and I am one of the few people who isn't obsessively negative about everything Japan does. Indeed I just said that every Country media is biased, but this opinion is apparently very unpopular here.

-7 ( +5 / -12 )

What jpn_guy said. Any person or nation that feeds off praise to such a ridiculous extent is deeply insecure, literally almost crippled by it. Why such constant external validation is necessary when you're obviously so great and wonderful to begin with... Confident people or nations who know their strengths don't care.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

The Japanese are known for being humble and modest. The modesty is more in the interactions between and among people and less as that of a nation. So the cleaning up of football stadiums after matches is less of consideration of the clean up crew but more as a pride in being well behaved and extreme mannerism.

The NHK reporter’s question shows more interest in how Japan performed and is similar to news and interviews on a Japanese athlete finishing 6th in an Olympic event but no reports on who won the medals.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Spot the juvenile in the room folks.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

UchuujinApr. 12 05:22 pm JSTWhat else can you expect. There is a mix of desperation and arrogance at the same time. Japanese are desperate to hear their own praise ! Sad and hilarious :)

American media is really nationalistic and stupid. If it weren't for the internet (science websites) the current groundbreaking Hayabusa 2 mission to Ryuku wouldn't be getting any coverage at all. US TV s too stupid to give credit where credit is due. And as for Dr. Katie Bourman, who's behind the algorithms providing us the black hole image: she's intelligent, young and cute - and an American. She's also a bit of an exception to the rule of famous American females. 99% of famous females (or at least in the limelight) in America are bimbos, unbelievable dense, dizzy and stupid.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Actually, what you think looks like a black hole really isn’t-no light is reflected from it at all.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

A shout out to JT Editors: Thanks for publishing this story on your site. I quite enjoyed it - including the great commentary - and would likely not have read it elsewhere. :-)

4 ( +5 / -1 )

A handful of Japanese Twitter users, though, have responded in a harsher tone.

“While the journalists from all sorts of other countries were asking questions about science, the NHK reporter was all like ‘Tell me about the contributions of Japan!’”

 “The question from the NHK reporter during the NSF press conference was totally embarrassing.”

It was indeed cringeworthy.

However, Sheperd Doeleman, Event Horizon Telescope project director and the panelist who fielded the NHK reporter’s question, was willing to at least partially indulge him, responding with:

“I can say something about that. I’ve worked very closely with many people at the national astronomical observatory of Japan and others. Japan has played a very key role, as have a number of countries. Japan, for example, was one of the key members of the project that phased up ALMA. They took all the dishes in the ALMA [radio telescope] array in the high Atacama Desert [in Chile], and they made them essentially one dish that we could record on one set of equipment, and that has been huge. And they’ve been a key partner in the imaging techniques, and pushing that forward too.”

However, Doleman ( Doeleman ) made sure to bring his statement back toward crediting the project’s success to the efforts of all its contributors, wrapping up his answer with:

“But the key is that each country, each region, each group, each institute, brought something in kind, and they brought their expertise, and they brought their work. You know, at the end of the day, you just need the stuff to get done, and everyone came with a full heart, really, and the expertise and the energy, to make this image that we’ve presented to you today.”

Mr. Doeleman's response was excellent.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Why would anyone want to purposely be associated with this hoax?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Several years ago, after an airliner disappeared, a reporter asked if the plane could have been sucked into a black hole.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

First and foremost, under Abe, the NHK has become pure propaganda. Historically

that was not the case but under the Japanese Trump it is. So the reporter is just

following instructions.

To the point of Japans obsession with itself, after Japan washed out of the 2017 WBC

last time losing to the USA 2-1, the coverage of the final match on TV here was non-existent. It was like the WBC stopped after Japan lost. No coverage at all.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Soooo, about that NHK fee. - still an emphatic "Not today, or ever, my friend".

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Meanwhile in Malaysia, we were apparently very proud of the fact one of the guys on the team was Malaysian .. Penangite in particular.

https://malaysia.news.yahoo.com/penangite-among-first-scientists-behind-023159194.html

I don't think Japan's the only country that wants a piece of the attention surrounding this momentous occassion. Every country wants credit for being "involved" in some form or other no matter how small. Give the NHK reporter a break.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Japan has simultaneous and juxtaposing inferiority and superiority complexes.

"JAPAN NUMBER ONE! .....you think so, right Mr. Gaijin? Don't you agree? What do you think?"

1 ( +4 / -3 )

The reporter himself seems to be also slightly laughing as if trying to evoke laughter.

He clearly knew how other people might feel his question.

But I think his intention is not about boasting Japanese expertise. 

Scientists from a Japanese national institution contributed to the finding. Considering the institution is funded by taxpayers money, public broadcaster is expected to explain how those money are used. Therefore, they needed to know how Japanese institutions had contributed to the project.

I think he had just done his job.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Typical Japan..... just watch Japanese TV, they constantly tout things Japan. I think Japanese TV gives many Japanese a false sense of superiority.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

zurcroniumApr. 14 01:54 pm JSTFirst and foremost, under Abe, the NHK has become pure propaganda. Historically

that was not the case but under the Japanese Trump it is. So the reporter is just

following instructions.

To the point of Japans obsession with itself, after Japan washed out of the 2017 WBC

last time losing to the USA 2-1, the coverage of the final match on TV here was non-existent. It was like the WBC stopped after Japan lost. No coverage at all.

It gets that way on US TV too. It happens sometimes during the Olympics. I remember vividly that happened during 1996 in Atlanta - an election year no less. No coverage of anything but American victories (esp gold because 'only the gold will do!'), and chatterbox reporters flapping their lips like Pac-Man at 800 miles per minute. That was the Ego-lympics and it made me so sick and disgusted.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It's just too bad Suzuki Daisetsu never toed the authoritarian line ... otherwise Japan Inc. could crow loud and proud about how Zen had predicted Black Holes long before Einstein came along.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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